This title is not available in our membership service

We’re working with the publisher to make it available as soon as possible.

Request Title
NOT AVAILABLE

In 1958, author Aldous Huxley wrote what some would call a sequel to his novel Brave New World (1932) but the sequel did not revisit the story or the characters. Instead, Huxley chose to revisit the world he created in a set of twelve essays in which he meditates on how his fantasy seemed to be becoming a reality and far more quickly than he ever imagined.

That Huxley’s book Brave New World had been largely prophetic about a dystopian future a great distress to Huxley. By 1958, Huxley was sixty-four-years old; the world had been transformed by the events of World War II and the terrifying advent of nuclear weapons. Peeking behind the Iron Curtain where people were not free but instead governed by Totalitarianism, Huxley could only bow to grim prophecy of his friend, author George Orwell, (author of the book 1984). It struck Huxley that people were trading their freedom and individualism in exchange for the illusory comfort of sensory pleasure--just as he had predicted in Brave New World.

In 1958, Huxley heard a world that was full of noise--a world of what he called singing commercials that flooded the mass media. Also, he saw people everywhere taking tranquilizers and beginning to surrender to modern life; it was not unlike the soporific drug Soma in his novel. The power of propaganda, he believed, had been validated by the rise of Hitler, and the postwar world was using it effectively to manipulate the masses. Overpopulation was already an issue, and Huxley saw the emergence of an overpopulated world in which chaos ruled and was being countered more and more by centralized control. It was not at all unlike what happens in his book in which the ultimate controlling capitalist of Huxley’s early years, Henry Ford, becomes the equivalent of God.

Huxley despairs of contemporary humankind’s willingness to surrender freedom for pleasure. Huxley worried that the rallying cry, “Give me liberty or give me death” could be easily replaced by “Give me television and hamburgers, but don’t bother me with the responsibilities of liberty.” Huxley saw hope in education; education that could teach people to see beyond the easy slogans and efficient ends and anesthetic-like influence of propaganda.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Writer Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) was an extraordinary man who brought to his work a strong sense of the world into which he was born (amid the rarefied privilege of a distinguished English family), his own probing intelligence, and a restless soul. Huxley’s grandfather was the eminent biologist and writer Thomas Huxley, who helped Darwin realize his theory of evolution, and his mother was the niece of poet Matthew Arnold (Huxley’s brother Julian also became an esteemed writer and their half-brother Andrew won a 1963 Nobel Prize in physiology).

Success came early to Huxley, and he enjoyed poking fun at society’s pretensions in some of his satirical novels like Crome Yellow and Antic Hay. The publication of Brave New World in 1932 marked a sea-change for Huxley. Growing maturity had brought him interest in political, philosophical, as well as spiritual matters that form the root of some of his other novels such as Eyeless in Gaza, After Many a Summer Dies the Swan and Time Must Have a Stop.

Published: RosettaBooks on
ISBN: 9780795311697
List price: $8.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Brave New World Revisited
    Dated -- obviously--, boring and written in an uninteresting way.more
    another book on the evils of the future- was pretty good and if you consider he wrote it in 1933 it is excellent . would recomend it to those interested in this genre and would like to read his other works.more
    An excellent companion to Brave New World. Written in 1958, it has just the right about of distance from the original work, yet close enough for Huxley to basically be the same person as when he wrote the original. There is so much to talk about in this short book I'm not sure where to begin. Brave New World Revisited is Huxley's post-WWII take on his book, first published in 1932. What is amazing and almost eerie is how much of what Huxley writes about we are seeing today. The concept of "Endless War," the growing dependence on medication to improve mood and productivity, the increase in surveillance, the power of modern propaganda, mass media, etc. Huxley takes themes from 1984 and Brave New World and extrapolates on what things will look like in the next millennium. Our millennium. What's amazing is how nearly all of this book is still relevant today. Shockingly relevant. It seems we are just now reaching a point where the world Huxley and to a lesser extent Orwell envisioned is a realistic threat.Of course, there are some things that are silly by today's standards. Huxley's theories on subliminal messaging and sleep teaching have never come to fruition. Also, even where he recognizes the danger of drugs emerging during his time, he writes a glowing review of LSD, the drug that dominated his final years. How a brilliant man like Huxley could fail to realize he was prey to his own soma is perplexing. Lastly, Huxley's words on overpopulation are much more relevant now than during his own time, but still have not reached the level of danger he predicted.There are a few moments of annoyance, where Huxley takes small shots at religion, without ever addressing the issue or justifying his assumptions. But these are very minor. Overall, if you recognize Brave New World as a piece of great literature, or you wish to learn about the origin of many of our modern problems, read this book. I did not do it due justice, trust me.more
    my favorite book of all time. including, Heaven and Hell BNWR tells it EXACTLY how it is.more
    Read all 4 reviews

    Reviews

    Dated -- obviously--, boring and written in an uninteresting way.more
    another book on the evils of the future- was pretty good and if you consider he wrote it in 1933 it is excellent . would recomend it to those interested in this genre and would like to read his other works.more
    An excellent companion to Brave New World. Written in 1958, it has just the right about of distance from the original work, yet close enough for Huxley to basically be the same person as when he wrote the original. There is so much to talk about in this short book I'm not sure where to begin. Brave New World Revisited is Huxley's post-WWII take on his book, first published in 1932. What is amazing and almost eerie is how much of what Huxley writes about we are seeing today. The concept of "Endless War," the growing dependence on medication to improve mood and productivity, the increase in surveillance, the power of modern propaganda, mass media, etc. Huxley takes themes from 1984 and Brave New World and extrapolates on what things will look like in the next millennium. Our millennium. What's amazing is how nearly all of this book is still relevant today. Shockingly relevant. It seems we are just now reaching a point where the world Huxley and to a lesser extent Orwell envisioned is a realistic threat.Of course, there are some things that are silly by today's standards. Huxley's theories on subliminal messaging and sleep teaching have never come to fruition. Also, even where he recognizes the danger of drugs emerging during his time, he writes a glowing review of LSD, the drug that dominated his final years. How a brilliant man like Huxley could fail to realize he was prey to his own soma is perplexing. Lastly, Huxley's words on overpopulation are much more relevant now than during his own time, but still have not reached the level of danger he predicted.There are a few moments of annoyance, where Huxley takes small shots at religion, without ever addressing the issue or justifying his assumptions. But these are very minor. Overall, if you recognize Brave New World as a piece of great literature, or you wish to learn about the origin of many of our modern problems, read this book. I did not do it due justice, trust me.more
    my favorite book of all time. including, Heaven and Hell BNWR tells it EXACTLY how it is.more
    scribd