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Ray Kinsella is sitting quietly on the back porch of his Iowa farm one evening when he hears the ghostly voice of a baseball announcer who says to him, “If you build it, he will come.” Needing no further explanation, Kinsella immediately sees in his mind’s eye a baseball field that he is being asked to create in the middle of a corn field. The voice will speak only two other things to Ray: “Ease his pain” and “Go the distance,” and yet the dreaming, idealistic man knows just what he is supposed to do. He knows that digging up the corn field in the back of his house will inspire the return of baseball legend Shoeless Joe Jackson, a man whose reputation was forever tarnished by the scandalous 1919 World Series. So opens the award-winning novel by W.P. Kinsella which was the inspiration for the incredibly popular film Field of Dreams starring Kevin Costner.

W.P. Kinsella has been called a great writer of baseball novels but this title transcends that description. Kinsella doesn’t merely treat baseball as a subject in and of itself; instead, he uses it as a metaphor to discuss larger issues such as innocence, belief, and perhaps above all of these things, America. Shoeless Joe is a parable about one of the most fundamental American ideals: beginning anew.

By plowing up a large section of his farmland, Ray Kinsella is both building and rebuilding, creating what has never been as well as re-creating in a sense what had come before. The land had been a place where past sins could be expunged and a new vision realized. It is exactly this sort of renewal that Kinsella’s quixotic creation brings about. Most importantly, this is a story about renewal and redress of trauma and sins of the past.

Shoeless Joe is #47 on the Sports Illustrated Greatest 100 Sports books.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Canadian author W.P. Kinsella was born in 1935 on a farm in Northern Alberta and did not receive his B.A. in creative writing until he was thirty-nine. Before that, Kinsella held a series of odd jobs including working as a taxi driver, selling insurance, and managing a restaurant. While he began writing short fiction at seventeen, Kinsella did not see publication until 1979 with his work Dance Me Outside. He became a sensation in 1982 with Shoeless Joe, a novel about an Iowa man who digs up part of his cornfield in order to build a baseball field. This novel was an elaboration of his short story, “Shoeless Joe Jackson Comes to Iowa,” which won the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship and was made into the popular film Field of Dreams in 1989.

SERIES DESCRIPTIONS

From classic book to classic film, RosettaBooks has gathered some of most memorable books into film available. The selection is broad ranging and far reaching, with books from classic genre to cult classic to science fiction and horror and a blend of the two creating whole new genres like Richard Matheson’s The Shrinking Man. Classic works from Vonnegut, one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, meet with E.M. Forster’s A Passage to India. Whether the work is centered in the here and now, in the past, or in some distant and almost unimaginable future, each work is lasting and memorable and award-winning.

Published: RosettaBooks on Apr 15, 1982
ISBN: 9780795311710
List price: $8.99
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I think everything has been said about this book already. Personal observations are: A few differences from the movie, notably the "Terrence Mann" character. Much better in the book, Ray's brother, the time sequence is switched up a little here and there, and Annie is supportive but very subdued. I read this book as a "buddy" read with my husband. I think there were a few time when the author went off on rants and my husband sort of tuned out.But, other than that this was a whale of a read. I'm not even a baseball fan!read more
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This is one of those few cases in life when the movie was considerably better than the book. The conflict between the main character and his father drives the movie, but is completely absent in the novel. The changes made by Hollywood were actually wonderful.The book is okay, but it does not have that driving conflict to sustain it. I wholeheartedly recommend the film, but the book is not nearly as good.read more
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I read this curtesy of one of Mcrosoft Readers free book releases. It or more likely the short story it was based on. is the basis for the film Field of Dreams.An elegic book about baseball and second chances reccomended to everyone whether you give a damn about the sport or not.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Better than the movie.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I bought this book at the Field of Dreams site in Iowa. I enjoyed the book. I read it after I had seen the movie several times. It was interesting to read the layout of the field. It was different then in the movie.read more
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If you're like me, reading Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella for the first time after being a long time fan of the movie, then you're in for a treat. Of course, if you expect it to read like a novelization of Field of Dreams, then you'll be disappointed.The story is a deliberate and passionate journey of a man following a crazy voice in his head to build a baseball field in place of the crops on his Iowa farm. He risks his family's livelihood for the sake of a dream, and because he loves his wife, daughter, Iowa and baseball. The writing is leisurely as if stretching back across the 20th century from the very time of Shoeless Joe Jackson. Give yourself time to get enveloped in this one.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great story about following ones dreams, no matter how crazy they seem. Ray Kinsella hears a voice and sees a vision that sets him off on a quest to build a baseball diamond and bring back those who can appreciate it. W.P. Kinsella, the author, has a wonderful writing style, and his descriptions can take you into elements of Ray's trip even if you have never experienced a ball park or carnival midway. I always enjoy re-reading the book when he describes Iowa City, the university campus, and Pearson's Drugstore, which all bring back memories for a former Hawkeye.read more
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Kinsella was one of my favorite authors growing up and this is one his best books. Adapted into the wonderful film "Field of Dreams", the book is even better including a more thorough back story, JD Salinger, and the oldest living Chicago Cub! Plus no one tops Kinsella's voice for baseball magic realism.read more
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Have you ever seen a movie - and wondered if the book was really better (you know, like they ALWAYS say)? Well, here is your chance. Most people have seen the film "Field of Dreams." That movie, staring Kevin Costner, Ray Liotta, and the University of Michigan's own James Earl Jones, tells the story of a man losing his farm to foreclosure because he has decided to build a baseball field in the middle of a corn field in Iowa. Once the field is built, many former players come from the field to play ball. By former players - I mean dead players - who are led by a man who is possibly the greatest baseball player of all time - "Shoeless" Joe Jackson. Also - Ray Kinsella, the main character who built the field, gets a chance to see his father come back from the dead to play catch again. There are a few differences, the author that Kinsella goes to meet in Boston is JD Salinger, as opposed to the fictitious Terrance Mann played by James Earl Jones in the movie. And the book really shows more character development in Ray, his wife, JD Salinger, and "Moonlight" Graham. If you love baseball and movies, this is a must read. This book will give you a new appreciation for baseball and the small nuances of the game.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Ray is a man possessed by love. Love for his family, love for the sprawling farmland of Iowa, and most importantly, love for the game of baseball. It's this love that makes Ray take chances with all three. Spurred on by a mystical voice Ray builds a left field out in part of his cornfield. But, the voice doesn't stop there. Soon it has Ray driving to Vermont to kidnap J.D. Salinger and from there the adventure really begins. Battling debt, childhood devils, and indecision Ray leans on his ever-understanding wife (and later, Salinger) to build a cornfield stadium that only a few can understand. It's a magical story, perfect for Christmastime when the season is all about dreams and believing in the impossible.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
SPOILER:OK, so the writing is nice. A little flowery, a little over-poetic with the metaphors, but very readable & I had trouble putting it down. The getting over the 60's thing wasn't in the book. So I was feeling positive toward it.But there are 2 problems. One is that the nostalgia thing is still there, the idea of this perfect Iowa past that will save people, this perfect White Iowa past, this perfect isolated, lonely, hard-working Iowa past; this perfect women-in-the-kitchen Iowa past.... Etc. And the 2nd problem is Bluestein. Abner Bluestein. Short & greasy & greedy & the money-hungry, heartless accountant. Somehow the Jew in this Protestant place.read more
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Well it’s supposed to be about dreams, magic, life and not about baseball...wrong it’s about baseball and an American understanding that baseball is a way to unlock dreams, magic, and life.But I am not an American follower of Baseball so along with Underworld by Don DeLillo it went over my head (although DeLillo’s books first chapter was a stunning, lyrical depiction of the centuries’ baseball World Series final moments). So is Shoeless Joe...stunning, lyrical writing? No, assume wooden, workaday.Think I am being harsh? Well I look forward to a story based of a brickie who puts a goal up in Norfolk. George Best then appears to help him build the football pitch and gradually all the world ** players appear (Lev Yashin as goalie, Carlos Alberto Torres, Nílton Santos as full backs, Franz Beckenbauer, Bobby Moore as centre backs etc for one last game with the Brickie’s long lost father as the ref. That I would understand so Nick Hornby get writing it. But for the moment I am sticking to the film of the book-Field of Dreams. And making a mental note to be wary of any book that has a sports theme!** run past me again how in Baseball one country = a world series whilst the 2006 World cup has 198 counties competing and over 700 million people watched the actual finalsread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As the basis for the Best Picture nominated film Field of Dreams, it’s impossible now to read WP Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe without conjuring images of Kevin Costner, Ray Liotta, and James Earl Jones. And yet, Shoeless Joe is such a timeless book that, no matter whose faces are placed in the roles of Ray Kinsella, Shoeless Joe Jackson, and JD Salinger, the depth and spirit of the story remain unchanged.Ray Kinsella’s journey, from his cornfield-turned-ballpark to Fenway Park and then to the Iron Range and Moonlight Graham’s Chisholm, Minnesota is the story of man longing for meaning in his life. He never really wanted to be a farmer, but fell in to the profession when he married a young Iowa girl and found himself incapable of leaving. When a voice tells him to mow down his corn and build left field so that, “he will come”, Kinsella does not hesitate in the slightest. He follows of the voice’s commands to the point of kidnapping JD Salinger from his secluded New Hampshire home. Kinsella needs purpose in his life beyond the day-to-day business of running his farm. Ultimately, he finds in purpose in the realization that “he” was not Shoeless Joe, but Ray’s own father, and he realizes that his entire journey brought him back to his family.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Just as there is comfort food, there is comfort reading. And for me, there is no better comfort reading than W.P. Kinsella’s classic baseball fantasy, Shoeless Joe. I re-read this one every few years to remind myself why I fell in love with the game in the first place – and why that romance has lasted for over 50 years now. What is not to like about a novel about baseball, family and second chances? Keep in mind that this is not Field of Dreams, the great Kevin Costner movie based on Kinsella’s novel. Shoeless Joe is better.Ray Kinsella, an accidental farmer, lives with his wife and little girl on a rented Iowa farm. Ray is still learning on the job, and things are not going well. But despite the family’s financial problems, Ray is willing to plow up a substantial portion of his cornfield when he hears what seems to be the voice of a baseball announcer saying to him, “If you build it, he will come.” Weird as that is, Ray instinctively knows that he is Shoeless Joe Jackson, one of the disgraced Chicago White Sox players accused of throwing the 1919 World Series (and his father’s favorite baseball player). So build it, he does. Building the stadium, though, is just the beginning of Ray’s quest, a quest that will lead him on a cross-country road trip to the hideaway home of reclusive author J.D. Salinger. Ray knows that he needs to bring Salinger back to his little Iowa ballpark, but he does not know why – and Salinger is having none of it, so Ray kidnaps him. On the way back to Iowa, Ray stops in Boston to deliver on the promise he made to Salinger to bring him to a game at Fenway Park if he would just get in the car. Late in the game, Ray’s personal announcer makes another appearance to give Ray and Salinger a hint about what they need to do next.Shoeless Joe is, especially for hardcore baseball fans, a thing of beauty. It is primarily a novel about the beauty of second chances. Shoeless Joe Jackson and the Black Sox get to play baseball again; Ray reconciles with the twin brother he lost track of years earlier; old men who barely missed out on the opportunity to play major league baseball get a chance to see their younger selves compete with and against ghost players from the past; Ray gets to see his father as a young man. And Ray gets a second chance to save his farm from his scheming brother-in-law.This is a book about following one’s dreams, taking chances, and joyously living the only shot at life any of us will ever be blessed to have. When I need to remind myself of these principles, I reach for Shoeless Joe. It has done the trick for three decades – and I hope there are still several more re-reads in my future.Rated at: 5.0read more
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I am not a baseball person by any means, despite Cooperstown being 45 minutes away. Maybe that is why I did not love this book. Maybe it's because I'm a curmidgeonly young person who hates those tourists who find it in their best interest to do 30 MPH in a 45 MPH, and the main character Ray, reminded me of those tourists. To be brutally honest, I could not read this book without hearing Kevin Costner in my head. I also kept picturing James Earl Jones as the author, even though the author (JD Salinger) was white. Maybe I should take this as proof that I shouldn't watch a movie before reading a book, but I won't. What can I say? The characters were one-dimensional. The writing was akin to someone in writing class who has promise, but no voice of their own, in other words, it was conventional. The antagonist, Ray's brother in law, was continually described as twirling his moustache. Ray's wife was perfect even though her boobs were small(so I'm shallow). Ray's child was always being compared to flowers and nature. Lame.I think this book would be excellent for baseball fans. Unfortunately, I'm going to have to say I liked the movie better.read more
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One of the few examples that I can think of where the movie is better than the book. Not just because they are different, but because the cliches in the book are so glaring. The movie is certainly loaded with cliches, but it works, somehow. The book is not worth the time.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wonderful story.... this is the book that the movie "Field of Dreams' was based on. The movie was great but this is better....with the book you get the full 7 course dinner not a lite version a movie can only allow. The movie does a good job and is fairly true to the book, except the character Terrance Mann (played by James Earl Jones) is actually J.D. Salinger in the book. There are a few other differences as well, and the book has Ray's brother and a couple other characters not from the movie. A great baseball book for all ages!read more
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I loved this story. Its one that will stay with me, it left me in tears after reading it. It is more than a book about baseball, but cherished memories and loved ones. I was introduced to it by my Fiancee, and can't thank her enough for that. I love you Belle.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the book that became the movie, "Field of Dreams". Love 'em both (the book and the movie).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I think everything has been said about this book already. Personal observations are: A few differences from the movie, notably the "Terrence Mann" character. Much better in the book, Ray's brother, the time sequence is switched up a little here and there, and Annie is supportive but very subdued. I read this book as a "buddy" read with my husband. I think there were a few time when the author went off on rants and my husband sort of tuned out.But, other than that this was a whale of a read. I'm not even a baseball fan!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is one of those few cases in life when the movie was considerably better than the book. The conflict between the main character and his father drives the movie, but is completely absent in the novel. The changes made by Hollywood were actually wonderful.The book is okay, but it does not have that driving conflict to sustain it. I wholeheartedly recommend the film, but the book is not nearly as good.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this curtesy of one of Mcrosoft Readers free book releases. It or more likely the short story it was based on. is the basis for the film Field of Dreams.An elegic book about baseball and second chances reccomended to everyone whether you give a damn about the sport or not.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Better than the movie.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I bought this book at the Field of Dreams site in Iowa. I enjoyed the book. I read it after I had seen the movie several times. It was interesting to read the layout of the field. It was different then in the movie.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you're like me, reading Shoeless Joe by W. P. Kinsella for the first time after being a long time fan of the movie, then you're in for a treat. Of course, if you expect it to read like a novelization of Field of Dreams, then you'll be disappointed.The story is a deliberate and passionate journey of a man following a crazy voice in his head to build a baseball field in place of the crops on his Iowa farm. He risks his family's livelihood for the sake of a dream, and because he loves his wife, daughter, Iowa and baseball. The writing is leisurely as if stretching back across the 20th century from the very time of Shoeless Joe Jackson. Give yourself time to get enveloped in this one.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great story about following ones dreams, no matter how crazy they seem. Ray Kinsella hears a voice and sees a vision that sets him off on a quest to build a baseball diamond and bring back those who can appreciate it. W.P. Kinsella, the author, has a wonderful writing style, and his descriptions can take you into elements of Ray's trip even if you have never experienced a ball park or carnival midway. I always enjoy re-reading the book when he describes Iowa City, the university campus, and Pearson's Drugstore, which all bring back memories for a former Hawkeye.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Kinsella was one of my favorite authors growing up and this is one his best books. Adapted into the wonderful film "Field of Dreams", the book is even better including a more thorough back story, JD Salinger, and the oldest living Chicago Cub! Plus no one tops Kinsella's voice for baseball magic realism.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Have you ever seen a movie - and wondered if the book was really better (you know, like they ALWAYS say)? Well, here is your chance. Most people have seen the film "Field of Dreams." That movie, staring Kevin Costner, Ray Liotta, and the University of Michigan's own James Earl Jones, tells the story of a man losing his farm to foreclosure because he has decided to build a baseball field in the middle of a corn field in Iowa. Once the field is built, many former players come from the field to play ball. By former players - I mean dead players - who are led by a man who is possibly the greatest baseball player of all time - "Shoeless" Joe Jackson. Also - Ray Kinsella, the main character who built the field, gets a chance to see his father come back from the dead to play catch again. There are a few differences, the author that Kinsella goes to meet in Boston is JD Salinger, as opposed to the fictitious Terrance Mann played by James Earl Jones in the movie. And the book really shows more character development in Ray, his wife, JD Salinger, and "Moonlight" Graham. If you love baseball and movies, this is a must read. This book will give you a new appreciation for baseball and the small nuances of the game.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Ray is a man possessed by love. Love for his family, love for the sprawling farmland of Iowa, and most importantly, love for the game of baseball. It's this love that makes Ray take chances with all three. Spurred on by a mystical voice Ray builds a left field out in part of his cornfield. But, the voice doesn't stop there. Soon it has Ray driving to Vermont to kidnap J.D. Salinger and from there the adventure really begins. Battling debt, childhood devils, and indecision Ray leans on his ever-understanding wife (and later, Salinger) to build a cornfield stadium that only a few can understand. It's a magical story, perfect for Christmastime when the season is all about dreams and believing in the impossible.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
SPOILER:OK, so the writing is nice. A little flowery, a little over-poetic with the metaphors, but very readable & I had trouble putting it down. The getting over the 60's thing wasn't in the book. So I was feeling positive toward it.But there are 2 problems. One is that the nostalgia thing is still there, the idea of this perfect Iowa past that will save people, this perfect White Iowa past, this perfect isolated, lonely, hard-working Iowa past; this perfect women-in-the-kitchen Iowa past.... Etc. And the 2nd problem is Bluestein. Abner Bluestein. Short & greasy & greedy & the money-hungry, heartless accountant. Somehow the Jew in this Protestant place.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Well it’s supposed to be about dreams, magic, life and not about baseball...wrong it’s about baseball and an American understanding that baseball is a way to unlock dreams, magic, and life.But I am not an American follower of Baseball so along with Underworld by Don DeLillo it went over my head (although DeLillo’s books first chapter was a stunning, lyrical depiction of the centuries’ baseball World Series final moments). So is Shoeless Joe...stunning, lyrical writing? No, assume wooden, workaday.Think I am being harsh? Well I look forward to a story based of a brickie who puts a goal up in Norfolk. George Best then appears to help him build the football pitch and gradually all the world ** players appear (Lev Yashin as goalie, Carlos Alberto Torres, Nílton Santos as full backs, Franz Beckenbauer, Bobby Moore as centre backs etc for one last game with the Brickie’s long lost father as the ref. That I would understand so Nick Hornby get writing it. But for the moment I am sticking to the film of the book-Field of Dreams. And making a mental note to be wary of any book that has a sports theme!** run past me again how in Baseball one country = a world series whilst the 2006 World cup has 198 counties competing and over 700 million people watched the actual finals
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As the basis for the Best Picture nominated film Field of Dreams, it’s impossible now to read WP Kinsella’s Shoeless Joe without conjuring images of Kevin Costner, Ray Liotta, and James Earl Jones. And yet, Shoeless Joe is such a timeless book that, no matter whose faces are placed in the roles of Ray Kinsella, Shoeless Joe Jackson, and JD Salinger, the depth and spirit of the story remain unchanged.Ray Kinsella’s journey, from his cornfield-turned-ballpark to Fenway Park and then to the Iron Range and Moonlight Graham’s Chisholm, Minnesota is the story of man longing for meaning in his life. He never really wanted to be a farmer, but fell in to the profession when he married a young Iowa girl and found himself incapable of leaving. When a voice tells him to mow down his corn and build left field so that, “he will come”, Kinsella does not hesitate in the slightest. He follows of the voice’s commands to the point of kidnapping JD Salinger from his secluded New Hampshire home. Kinsella needs purpose in his life beyond the day-to-day business of running his farm. Ultimately, he finds in purpose in the realization that “he” was not Shoeless Joe, but Ray’s own father, and he realizes that his entire journey brought him back to his family.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Just as there is comfort food, there is comfort reading. And for me, there is no better comfort reading than W.P. Kinsella’s classic baseball fantasy, Shoeless Joe. I re-read this one every few years to remind myself why I fell in love with the game in the first place – and why that romance has lasted for over 50 years now. What is not to like about a novel about baseball, family and second chances? Keep in mind that this is not Field of Dreams, the great Kevin Costner movie based on Kinsella’s novel. Shoeless Joe is better.Ray Kinsella, an accidental farmer, lives with his wife and little girl on a rented Iowa farm. Ray is still learning on the job, and things are not going well. But despite the family’s financial problems, Ray is willing to plow up a substantial portion of his cornfield when he hears what seems to be the voice of a baseball announcer saying to him, “If you build it, he will come.” Weird as that is, Ray instinctively knows that he is Shoeless Joe Jackson, one of the disgraced Chicago White Sox players accused of throwing the 1919 World Series (and his father’s favorite baseball player). So build it, he does. Building the stadium, though, is just the beginning of Ray’s quest, a quest that will lead him on a cross-country road trip to the hideaway home of reclusive author J.D. Salinger. Ray knows that he needs to bring Salinger back to his little Iowa ballpark, but he does not know why – and Salinger is having none of it, so Ray kidnaps him. On the way back to Iowa, Ray stops in Boston to deliver on the promise he made to Salinger to bring him to a game at Fenway Park if he would just get in the car. Late in the game, Ray’s personal announcer makes another appearance to give Ray and Salinger a hint about what they need to do next.Shoeless Joe is, especially for hardcore baseball fans, a thing of beauty. It is primarily a novel about the beauty of second chances. Shoeless Joe Jackson and the Black Sox get to play baseball again; Ray reconciles with the twin brother he lost track of years earlier; old men who barely missed out on the opportunity to play major league baseball get a chance to see their younger selves compete with and against ghost players from the past; Ray gets to see his father as a young man. And Ray gets a second chance to save his farm from his scheming brother-in-law.This is a book about following one’s dreams, taking chances, and joyously living the only shot at life any of us will ever be blessed to have. When I need to remind myself of these principles, I reach for Shoeless Joe. It has done the trick for three decades – and I hope there are still several more re-reads in my future.Rated at: 5.0
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I am not a baseball person by any means, despite Cooperstown being 45 minutes away. Maybe that is why I did not love this book. Maybe it's because I'm a curmidgeonly young person who hates those tourists who find it in their best interest to do 30 MPH in a 45 MPH, and the main character Ray, reminded me of those tourists. To be brutally honest, I could not read this book without hearing Kevin Costner in my head. I also kept picturing James Earl Jones as the author, even though the author (JD Salinger) was white. Maybe I should take this as proof that I shouldn't watch a movie before reading a book, but I won't. What can I say? The characters were one-dimensional. The writing was akin to someone in writing class who has promise, but no voice of their own, in other words, it was conventional. The antagonist, Ray's brother in law, was continually described as twirling his moustache. Ray's wife was perfect even though her boobs were small(so I'm shallow). Ray's child was always being compared to flowers and nature. Lame.I think this book would be excellent for baseball fans. Unfortunately, I'm going to have to say I liked the movie better.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One of the few examples that I can think of where the movie is better than the book. Not just because they are different, but because the cliches in the book are so glaring. The movie is certainly loaded with cliches, but it works, somehow. The book is not worth the time.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wonderful story.... this is the book that the movie "Field of Dreams' was based on. The movie was great but this is better....with the book you get the full 7 course dinner not a lite version a movie can only allow. The movie does a good job and is fairly true to the book, except the character Terrance Mann (played by James Earl Jones) is actually J.D. Salinger in the book. There are a few other differences as well, and the book has Ray's brother and a couple other characters not from the movie. A great baseball book for all ages!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I loved this story. Its one that will stay with me, it left me in tears after reading it. It is more than a book about baseball, but cherished memories and loved ones. I was introduced to it by my Fiancee, and can't thank her enough for that. I love you Belle.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the book that became the movie, "Field of Dreams". Love 'em both (the book and the movie).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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