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In 1968, Arthur C. Clarke’s best-selling 2001: A Space Odyssey captivated the world—and was adapted into a now-classic film by Stanley Kubrick. Fans had to wait fourteen years for the sequel—but when it came out, it was an instant hit, winning the Hugo Award for Best Novel in 1983.

Nine years after the ill-fated Discovery One mission to Jupiter, a joint Soviet-American crew travels to the planet to investigate the mysterious monolith orbiting the planet, the cause of the earlier mission’s failure—and the disappearance of David Bowman. The crew includes Heywood Floyd, the lone survivor from the previous mission, and Dr. Chandra, the creator of HAL.

What they find is no less than an unsettling alien conspiracy—surrounding the evolutionary fate of indigenous life forms on Jupiter’s moon Europa, as well as that of the human species itself. A gripping continuation of the beloved Odyssey universe, 2010: Odyssey II is science-fiction storytelling at its best.

Topics: Space, Space Travel, Astronauts, Aliens, Survival, Adventurous, Futuristic, Speculative Fiction, Series, and Made into a Movie

Published: RosettaBooks on
ISBN: 9780795324826
List price: $8.99
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Nine years after the events of 2001, an expedition arrives to discover what went wrong with the earlier mission, to investigate the monolith in orbit around the planet, and to resolve the disappearance of David Bowman.I read this book a while ago, but I really enjoyed them. I especially remember traveling to the center of the Jupiter and discovering that it was a giant diamond, before the aliens turned Jupiter into a star and terra-formed one of its moons, Europe, to support nascent life there. I don't know why I thought that was so nifty; it just was.Read as part of a series (1990s).more
Disappointed that he aligned his sequels with the films, rather than keeping the plot centered on Saturn.more
"2010 - Odyssey Two" is a strong sequel to Arthur C. Clarke's renowned "2001 - A Space Odyssey". The story is well-crafted and the plot moves briskly, which makes for an enjoyable read. It's not deep on character development, and the action is infrequent, but delivered smartly and purposefully to provide the fuel for an interesting plot, expansive exposition of space, and exploration of key themes. Like the first novel, Clarke crafts his story and writing very deliberately to create a heavy and epic atmosphere. His primary theme revolves around evolution, and builds upon the mythology he created in "2001" by expanding on the role played by the unseen aliens in planting and encouraging life throughout the universe, including Earth and elsewhere within our own solar system.He spends just enough time on backstory to refresh readers on the salient points from the first book, but more importantly, provides a legend (within one of two foreword's/author's notes in this specific edition) to where the author followed storylines from his original novel, or from the famous movie which contained slight modifications.And yes, Clarke provides satisfying answers to many of the questions left without conclusion in the first book and movie.Clarke returns Dr. Heywood Floyd in this space-traveling saga, but this time in the lead role. He and two other Americans join a Russian crew aboard a starship headed to Jupiter to connect with the presumably abandoned and derelict 'Discovery', obtain information about the Monolith and find out what happened to lost crewman Dave Bowman. Dr. Floyd is a strong lead and the most three-dimensional of all characters in the story. His motivation for leaving his family on the very long journey: "Four men had died, and one had disappeared, out there among the moons of Jupiter. There was blood on his hands, and he did not know how to wash them clean."The trademark of great storytelling is the ability to convey ideas and themes through demonstration rather than outright telling. As a reader, I'd rather come to understand a characters' nature and motivations through the demonstration of certain behaviors and backstory, rather than be spoon-fed and literally told of one's characteristics. Clarke does a nice job of layering on the flesh of Dr. Floyd early in the story, and continuing to build as the plot progresses. None of the other characters on board the Russian craft are more than two dimensional, which increases the focus of the novel on Floyd, Star-Child/Post-Human Dave Bowman, and perhaps the story's central character: Jupiter and its moons.Among the Americans is Dr. Chandra, the parent/inventor of HAL9000, the 'Discovery's' near-sentient ship-computer that killed its original crew, which led Bowman to decommission its' cognizance. Chandra plays a key role as he works to restart HAL with the hope that he can help guide the ship back to earth, but also to shed light on why it developed the compu-psychoses that led to its' violent behavior. Chandra is drawn as the lovingly patient and near-obsessed parent focused on nurturing his lost child. The relationship between Chandra and HAL generate some terrific scenes throughout the book as HALs personality reemerges, including the first time it awakens from it's 9-year-long sleep: "Good morning, Dr. Chandra. This is Hal. I am ready for my first lesson." Dr. Floyd notices and comments on Dr. Chandra's work: "...to watch the steady regrowth of Hal's personality, from brain-damaged child to puzzled adolescent and at length to slightly condescending adult." "(It's like) disturbed youngsters were straightened out by all-wise descendants of the legendary Sigmund Freud! Essentially the same story was being played out in the shadow of Jupiter." The Chandra-HAL relationship creates tension within the plot as the crew can never fully trust HAL following his behavior in "2001"."2001" concluded with the Monolith's aliens shedding Bowman of his human form and 'raising' him up to a being that needs no real form, but exists as pure energy. This evolved Bowman returns in "2010" and acts as Clarke's guide to Jupiter and it's moons. He uses Bowman's exploration as a means to delve into the physical nature of those celestial bodies and postulation on what life could exist in those extreme environments. The exposition is detailed and written with a poetic flourish.Bowman is the evolutionary result of the experiments performed on the pre human man-apes by the Monolith millions of years ago, and famously portrayed in the original movie. In "2010", he becomes aware of how the alien beings introduced life and evolution throughout the universe, and monitor their progression over millions of years. These aliens are, for all intents and purposes, God. Clarke writes that the aliens, "...in all the galaxy, they had found nothing more precious than Mind, they encouraged its dawning everywhere. They became farmers in the fields of stars; they sowed, and sometimes they reaped." More ominously, he continues, "And sometimes, dispassionately, they had to weed."more
...And because in all the galaxy, they had found nothing more precious than Mind, they encouraged its dawning everywhere. They became farmers in the fields of stars; they sowed, and sometimes they reaped.And sometimes, dispassionately, they had to weed. Heywood Floyd and a crew of Russian astronauts are on a mission to the outer reaches of our solar system to retrieve a dilapidated spaceship and to salvage whatever information that was left behind by the long dead crew of the Discovery. Furthermore, they are to monitor and study the twin monolith, dubbed Big Brother that has been circulating Jupiter since the discovery of an exact replica was unearthed on Earth's moon. The mission should be a routine event with their objectives clearly defined and outlined by mission control on earth but everything begins to unravel when Floyd receives an ominous warning from a crew member on the Discovery, who should by all accounts be dead. With an unknown threat forcing the team to abort the mission early, the crew of the Russian spaceship Leonov unexpectedly become front row spectators in the cataclysmic destruction of Jupiter and the creation of a new star within our own solar system. The question of whether we are truly alone in the universe is answered; the answer a loud and resounding no.The second instalment of Odyssey series is just as good, if not better than 2001: A Space Odyssey. Questions and mysteries left unanswered in the first book are explained in 2010, but like any compelling story, events that transpire in the book lead us to ask even more questions. The subtle presence of an intelligence higher than our own creates an enjoyable tension that undoubtedly will leave me searching for the explanations in the subsequent followup books in the series. I have a sense, the journey is just beginning and I can't wait to see how Clarke will resolve the age old question - are we alone, and if we are not, who is out there and what do they want with us?more
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Reviews

Nine years after the events of 2001, an expedition arrives to discover what went wrong with the earlier mission, to investigate the monolith in orbit around the planet, and to resolve the disappearance of David Bowman.I read this book a while ago, but I really enjoyed them. I especially remember traveling to the center of the Jupiter and discovering that it was a giant diamond, before the aliens turned Jupiter into a star and terra-formed one of its moons, Europe, to support nascent life there. I don't know why I thought that was so nifty; it just was.Read as part of a series (1990s).more
Disappointed that he aligned his sequels with the films, rather than keeping the plot centered on Saturn.more
"2010 - Odyssey Two" is a strong sequel to Arthur C. Clarke's renowned "2001 - A Space Odyssey". The story is well-crafted and the plot moves briskly, which makes for an enjoyable read. It's not deep on character development, and the action is infrequent, but delivered smartly and purposefully to provide the fuel for an interesting plot, expansive exposition of space, and exploration of key themes. Like the first novel, Clarke crafts his story and writing very deliberately to create a heavy and epic atmosphere. His primary theme revolves around evolution, and builds upon the mythology he created in "2001" by expanding on the role played by the unseen aliens in planting and encouraging life throughout the universe, including Earth and elsewhere within our own solar system.He spends just enough time on backstory to refresh readers on the salient points from the first book, but more importantly, provides a legend (within one of two foreword's/author's notes in this specific edition) to where the author followed storylines from his original novel, or from the famous movie which contained slight modifications.And yes, Clarke provides satisfying answers to many of the questions left without conclusion in the first book and movie.Clarke returns Dr. Heywood Floyd in this space-traveling saga, but this time in the lead role. He and two other Americans join a Russian crew aboard a starship headed to Jupiter to connect with the presumably abandoned and derelict 'Discovery', obtain information about the Monolith and find out what happened to lost crewman Dave Bowman. Dr. Floyd is a strong lead and the most three-dimensional of all characters in the story. His motivation for leaving his family on the very long journey: "Four men had died, and one had disappeared, out there among the moons of Jupiter. There was blood on his hands, and he did not know how to wash them clean."The trademark of great storytelling is the ability to convey ideas and themes through demonstration rather than outright telling. As a reader, I'd rather come to understand a characters' nature and motivations through the demonstration of certain behaviors and backstory, rather than be spoon-fed and literally told of one's characteristics. Clarke does a nice job of layering on the flesh of Dr. Floyd early in the story, and continuing to build as the plot progresses. None of the other characters on board the Russian craft are more than two dimensional, which increases the focus of the novel on Floyd, Star-Child/Post-Human Dave Bowman, and perhaps the story's central character: Jupiter and its moons.Among the Americans is Dr. Chandra, the parent/inventor of HAL9000, the 'Discovery's' near-sentient ship-computer that killed its original crew, which led Bowman to decommission its' cognizance. Chandra plays a key role as he works to restart HAL with the hope that he can help guide the ship back to earth, but also to shed light on why it developed the compu-psychoses that led to its' violent behavior. Chandra is drawn as the lovingly patient and near-obsessed parent focused on nurturing his lost child. The relationship between Chandra and HAL generate some terrific scenes throughout the book as HALs personality reemerges, including the first time it awakens from it's 9-year-long sleep: "Good morning, Dr. Chandra. This is Hal. I am ready for my first lesson." Dr. Floyd notices and comments on Dr. Chandra's work: "...to watch the steady regrowth of Hal's personality, from brain-damaged child to puzzled adolescent and at length to slightly condescending adult." "(It's like) disturbed youngsters were straightened out by all-wise descendants of the legendary Sigmund Freud! Essentially the same story was being played out in the shadow of Jupiter." The Chandra-HAL relationship creates tension within the plot as the crew can never fully trust HAL following his behavior in "2001"."2001" concluded with the Monolith's aliens shedding Bowman of his human form and 'raising' him up to a being that needs no real form, but exists as pure energy. This evolved Bowman returns in "2010" and acts as Clarke's guide to Jupiter and it's moons. He uses Bowman's exploration as a means to delve into the physical nature of those celestial bodies and postulation on what life could exist in those extreme environments. The exposition is detailed and written with a poetic flourish.Bowman is the evolutionary result of the experiments performed on the pre human man-apes by the Monolith millions of years ago, and famously portrayed in the original movie. In "2010", he becomes aware of how the alien beings introduced life and evolution throughout the universe, and monitor their progression over millions of years. These aliens are, for all intents and purposes, God. Clarke writes that the aliens, "...in all the galaxy, they had found nothing more precious than Mind, they encouraged its dawning everywhere. They became farmers in the fields of stars; they sowed, and sometimes they reaped." More ominously, he continues, "And sometimes, dispassionately, they had to weed."more
...And because in all the galaxy, they had found nothing more precious than Mind, they encouraged its dawning everywhere. They became farmers in the fields of stars; they sowed, and sometimes they reaped.And sometimes, dispassionately, they had to weed. Heywood Floyd and a crew of Russian astronauts are on a mission to the outer reaches of our solar system to retrieve a dilapidated spaceship and to salvage whatever information that was left behind by the long dead crew of the Discovery. Furthermore, they are to monitor and study the twin monolith, dubbed Big Brother that has been circulating Jupiter since the discovery of an exact replica was unearthed on Earth's moon. The mission should be a routine event with their objectives clearly defined and outlined by mission control on earth but everything begins to unravel when Floyd receives an ominous warning from a crew member on the Discovery, who should by all accounts be dead. With an unknown threat forcing the team to abort the mission early, the crew of the Russian spaceship Leonov unexpectedly become front row spectators in the cataclysmic destruction of Jupiter and the creation of a new star within our own solar system. The question of whether we are truly alone in the universe is answered; the answer a loud and resounding no.The second instalment of Odyssey series is just as good, if not better than 2001: A Space Odyssey. Questions and mysteries left unanswered in the first book are explained in 2010, but like any compelling story, events that transpire in the book lead us to ask even more questions. The subtle presence of an intelligence higher than our own creates an enjoyable tension that undoubtedly will leave me searching for the explanations in the subsequent followup books in the series. I have a sense, the journey is just beginning and I can't wait to see how Clarke will resolve the age old question - are we alone, and if we are not, who is out there and what do they want with us?more
As a novel, 2001 is by far the best of the series, the other books simply relay certain events of a future that is completely believeable and realistic. As individual books, though, the sequels are lagging in the quality department, relative to 2001. That one should be required reading for anyone who considers themselves a SF fan, but the sequels exist only for the readers interested enough to see what a genius like Clark can imagine.2010 tells the story of the monoliths activating and creating a new sun out of Jupiter (sort of a spoiler, but I felt like I had read the book before somewhere the whole time and knew it was going to happen. Just not how. Oh yeah, and showing how the Russians and Americans can cooperate...An odd thing to quantify, how to phrase a recommendation of the series. They are good stories from a great imagination, but if SF isn't your cup of tea then the sequels are honestly best left at the bookstore. They are simply a vehicle for his idea of a future world of space faring and space living humans, really.more
Although this book is more of a sequel to the movie than the book, it is a good follow up to 2001. This book, in my opinion, is way better than the movie 2010. The movie leaves out huge chunks of the book, as well as changing some things, and also makes the relationship between the Americans and the Soviets more heated.more
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