Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks
“The children and nature movement is fueled by this fundamental idea: the child in nature is an endangered species, and the health of children and the health of the Earth are inseparable.” —Richard Louv, from the new edition

In his landmark work Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv brought together cutting-edge studies that pointed to direct exposure to nature as essential for a child’s healthy physical and emotional development. Now this new edition updates the growing body of evidence linking the lack of nature in children’s lives and the rise in obesity, attention disorders, and depression. Louv’s message has galvanized an international back-to-nature campaign to “Leave No Child Inside.” His book will change the way you think about our future and the future of our children.

“[The] national movement to ‘leave no child inside’ . . . has been the focus of Capitol Hill hearings, state legislative action, grass-roots projects, a U.S. Forest Service initiative to get more children into the woods and a national effort to promote a ‘green hour’ in each day. . . . The increased activism has been partly inspired by a best-selling book, Last Child in the Woods, and its author, Richard Louv.” —The Washington Post

Last Child in the Woods, which describes a generation so plugged into electronic diversions that it has lost its connection to the natural world, is helping drive a movement quickly flourishing across the nation.” —The Nation’s Health

 “This book is an absolute must-read for parents.” —The Boston Globe
 
Now includes
A Field Guide with 100 Practical Actions We Can Take 
Discussion Points for Book Groups, Classrooms, and Communities 
Additional Notes by the Author 
New and Updated Research from the U.S. and Abroad

Topics: The Environment, Parenting, Child Development , The Outdoors, Education, Family, Poignant, Informative, Exercise, Essays, and Guides

Published: Workman eBooks on Apr 22, 2008
ISBN: 9781565125865
List price: $15.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Last Child in the Woods by Richard Louv
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Clear rating

Enlightening, encouraging, depressing....so much great information and an interesting read. I have a bias that leans toward the outdoors already, so maybe this wouldn't strike the same chord with everyone, but I was regularly spouting information from this book to anyone who would (or wouldn't listen). Kids need nature - already knew that, this just reinforces my dedication to that idea. It's also a great book to keep around as a reference with a bunch of web sites and ideas for nature activities at the end of the book.Regardless of where you live, be it city, suburbia or somewhere more wild, there's nature there for the enjoying and this book explains why it's so very important for children (and adults) to make the most of it.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm reading this book now for a book group, and honestly, if I had a reason to quit reading it I would. It's a really boring collection of studies, really. I'm 200 pages in and so far I've gone paragraph to paragraph with statements like "in a 2007 study so and so Ph.D. found that blah blah blah" and "in 2003 a study found that blah blah blah". I would rather NOT read a compilation of studies. I much prefer a clear narrative.Boring.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
*Inspired and Important*Richard Louv makes important points about what we may cost ourselves, our children, and our future by becoming more urban and less connected to the natural world. Within living memory, even urban children often had access to an overgrown vacant lot which would be suitable for playing and exploring, whereas nowadays they're likely to be fenced in or inhabited by gangs and addicts (or both).An important book for parents in particular.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Enlightening, encouraging, depressing....so much great information and an interesting read. I have a bias that leans toward the outdoors already, so maybe this wouldn't strike the same chord with everyone, but I was regularly spouting information from this book to anyone who would (or wouldn't listen). Kids need nature - already knew that, this just reinforces my dedication to that idea. It's also a great book to keep around as a reference with a bunch of web sites and ideas for nature activities at the end of the book.Regardless of where you live, be it city, suburbia or somewhere more wild, there's nature there for the enjoying and this book explains why it's so very important for children (and adults) to make the most of it.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm reading this book now for a book group, and honestly, if I had a reason to quit reading it I would. It's a really boring collection of studies, really. I'm 200 pages in and so far I've gone paragraph to paragraph with statements like "in a 2007 study so and so Ph.D. found that blah blah blah" and "in 2003 a study found that blah blah blah". I would rather NOT read a compilation of studies. I much prefer a clear narrative.Boring.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
*Inspired and Important*Richard Louv makes important points about what we may cost ourselves, our children, and our future by becoming more urban and less connected to the natural world. Within living memory, even urban children often had access to an overgrown vacant lot which would be suitable for playing and exploring, whereas nowadays they're likely to be fenced in or inhabited by gangs and addicts (or both).An important book for parents in particular.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Although there were probably flaws in this book and in some of the author's arguments and suggestions, I gave it five stars because I think it's an important topic that was reasonably well addressed. Even as a fairly sedentary child who loved to read above all things, I spent plenty of time outdoors, climbing trees in the swamp behind our house, imagining on the rocky beach of Long Island Sound, throwing sticks for my grandfather's dog to catch.... My own children had more freedom than many in their generation, though probably not as much as I, and we did take them camping a lot. They have often remarked about kids they've babysat or nannied for that they do not (and often aren't allowed to) spend much time outdoors even when there is ample opportunity. I think this is an important book for parents, grandparents, and school administrators, among others. I would disagree with the author's idea that giving your kids a cell phone to take into the woods (or other natural area) is a necessary precaution. But if that's what it takes to get them outside, I guess it's OK.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Way too preachy with little empirical evidence behind any point made. Science journal readers beware.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this book a few years ago and have continually gone back to it. It presents an argument that is more profound with each passing year: that our children are disconnected from a world that is vanishing. Two ironies: the natural world is shrinking and children are kept from experiencing what's left of it. As a parent, I'm as guilty as anyone else. We spend too much time making connections on sites like this one and not enough time going out into nature. And we live in a culture that is increasingly disinterested in preservation of natural landscapes, that denies and diminishes science and research, that refuses to put resources and funding into ensuring that our children have the necessary grounding in natural science. Richard Louv's book is wonderful but tinged with heartbreaking realities. As a teacher, I can see how children connect immediately with even the smallest fragments of the nature that is around them. We owe it to our children to give them that kind of education every time there is an opportunity to do so.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Load more
scribd