From the Publisher

The world's foremost memory expert—and mega-bestselling author—proves that memory CAN get better with age!

Diet and exercise are great, but what good is a healthy body if you don't have the mental capabilities to go with it? Harry Lorayne, who is now 83 years old, has been honing and teaching his foolproof system for sharpening the mind, improving concentration, and attaining a truly "superpower" memory for more than 40 years. Ageless Memory is the culmination of this memory expert's life's work. Specifically geared to our needs as we age, his unique memory system can be put into practice immediately—for a better memory the very same day you open the book and start to read! Completely practical and easy to use, readers learn to:
Recall names and faces, even years later Never miss an appointment or misplace keys, glasses, valuables, etc.  Give speeches without notes and learn foreign words and phrases easily  Memorize long lists of items, quotations, long numbers, Bible verses, and all kinds of facts and figures  Excel at cards and other games  Regain (or maintain!) the confidence that comes with having a sharp, active mind.
It's not necessary to accept poor or waning memory or "senior moments" as inevitable results of growing older— and Harry Lorayne proves it in Ageless Memory!

Topics: Games, Exercise, Informative, and Guides

Published: Black Dog & Leventhal an imprint of Workman eBooks on
ISBN: 9781603761765
List price: $12.95
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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