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From the Publisher

Has your child been diagnosed with food allergies? If so, help is here! Colette Martin has been there too: When her son Patrick was diagnosed with multiple food allergies in 2001, she had to learn all-new ways to feed him—and especially to make baked goods that he both could and would eat.

Learning to Bake Allergen-Free is the book Colette Martin wishes she had back then. She ingeniously presents a dozen manageable lessons that will arm parents to prepare allergen-free baked goods the entire family can enjoy together. The book features:
• More than 70 recipes (including variations) sure to become family staples—for muffins, rolls, breads, cookies, bars, scones, cakes, tarts, pizza, and pies— starting with the easiest techniques and adding new skills along the way
• Clear explanations of the most common allergens and gluten, with all the details you need on which substitutions work, and why
• Hundreds of simple tips for adapting recipes and troubleshooting as you go
• Detailed guidelines and more than 15 recipes for making allergen-free treats from packaged gluten-free baking mixes
• Special crash courses focused on key ingredients and techniques, including sweetening options, decorating a cake simply but superbly, kicking everyday recipes up a notch, and much more!

Whether you already love to bake or are a kitchen novice, Learning to Bake Allergen-Free will give you the knowledge, skills, recipes, and confidence to make food that your family can safely eat—and that they’ll love!

Published: The Experiment an imprint of Workman eBooks on
ISBN: 9781615191505
List price: $15.95
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