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The Power of Now is a guide to spiritual awakening from a man who is emerging as one of this generation's clearest, most inspiring teachers on the subject. Eckhart Tolle is not aligned with any particular religion but does what all the great masters have done: shows that the way, the truth, and the light already exist within each human being. There is no need to look elsewhere.At the heart of this book is Tolle's own story of early despair that culminated in a life-transforming experience of enlightenment at the age of twenty-nine. He emerged to share insights on the perils of the mind, the power of the present, and the accessibility of one's true nature. According to Tolle, "To regain awareness of Being and to abide in that state of 'feeling-realization' is enlightenment."
Published: New World Library on Sep 24, 2010
ISBN: 9781577316916
List price: $14.95
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Excelente, es lo que he buscado por el tiempo de vida que llevo.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
es muy buenoread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
maybe i'm just not ready for this right now but it seemed kinda a)preachy b)common sense. might come back to it one day.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Eckhart Tolle is MISSING a huge bulk of the population, people who have incessant thoughts (or even an occasional wandering thought) but CAN will their mind to empty at will when they're not agitated.Tolle jumped from a lower type of consciousness (inability to empty) to a higher type (no wandering thoughts at all) so he missed the interim type. But check the Yahoo TPON forum, many people there talk about emptying their mind when they try, as a result of reading this book. The book didn't change the consciousness type of these people. It's a 3rd type and Tolle simply missed it.Having said that it's arguably the best book about consciousness ever written. I love it and it influenced my thinking deeply.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It opened my eyes to a new world, it was my introduction to the Budha way of thinking without to break with my old system of thoughts. After this book was easy to understand another books.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a wonderful example of the fine line between mental illness and genius.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think the problem with reading this book was that I read Tolle’s [A New Earth] first. When I got to this book, I knew what he was going to say. He said what I expected. You must learn to live in the present. You must learn to distinguish what is your ego speaking and then look upon your ego as an impediment to living in the “now”. Tolle said this over and over…and over.For someone beginning to learn about Eckhart Tolle’s philosophy (and this is not just his own philosophy, by the way), this may be a good starting point. The book is written in simple language and takes the form of questions and answers. It does try to address different kinds of solutions and has answers for the skeptic. I do know, from hearing Tolle speak on television, that he does not push his philosophy on people and allows people to learn about it from him only when they are ready.For people who say that this book is “too new agey”, I don’t find it that way. There is much about what Tolle speaks with which I agree. There is also, however, quite a bit with which I disagree. The best part of the book, I think, is that it gives readers a new way of handling issues that have occurred or will occur in their lives. If you don’t know anything about “the power of now”, by all means, start learning about it by reading this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Whilst tis book does provide an introduction to mindfulness it doesn't answer some of the fundamental challenges one may face in turning off the mind - and adopts a 'just do it' approach. It's bullish call to action is too much of a blunt instrument for me and further I think the book is really poorly written.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent book about being present. Tolle discusses how being attached to the past or the future can stop you from experiencing peace and joy, because you are 'in your head', and thus unconsious. You become fully consious by experiencing 'the now'. This is a great book about freedom, release and finding a way to be grounded and liberated despite the unavoidable threat of pain that exists in the world.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent sleep aid.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not a huge fan as I think Tolle recycles the wisdom from a lot of other folks. But he can be compelling.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The only moment we have is the present, and staying in the now brings peace and happiness. Dwelling in the past and future is illusionary. Lots of tangents emmenating from this premise.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Live in the Now, See from above. I read this at the same time I was reading The Lovely Bones. The two books compliment each other.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book showed me how to observe my thoughts (my ego) and how to be in the present moment. His teachings are true and by no means a new phenomenon. Tolle just adds to the spiritual readings available. I recommend this book to those who are searching for inner peace.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I believe this to be one of the most important spiritual works of our time. It sets out a practical guide to transcending many of the psychological difficulties and barriers that people face everywhere today irrespective of culture, age or background. It makes a very convincing argument for placing more emphasis on mindfulness and focusing on the here and now as a means to overcome much of the needless psychological suffering that we unwittingly heap on ourselves.Never has this message been more important than today, in a time when growing materialism and conflict create much havoc and pain.This book is written and delivered in a manner that will appeal to all people of all beliefs. It does not attach itself to any particular religion and could be of equal use to even the most ardent of atheists.Do not make the mistake of viewing it as just another self help book. This book changed my life and offers a common sensical and direct approach to age old spiritual questions that is nothing short of revolutionary. It is such texts that must play an important role in addressing spiritual matters whilst transcending the pitfalls of secularism and religious divide in a world where personal belief is endlessly diverse. Read it today.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a stunningly powerful book.I was attracted to the title as my work on organisational change had identified that organisations often chose to chase the illusion of best practice, an illusion created by a misunderstanding of time. I anticipated that the book may also explore this area. The book does this to a degree but has an emphasis on personal change.In the introduction Eckhart Tolle describes the origins of his thinking through a simple but powerful illustration, He talks of waking up with a feeling of deep loathing for the world and a deep sense of dread. The repeated thought that ‘I cannot live with myself’ leads to a sudden awareness of how peculiar this thought is. ‘Am I one or two?’ If I can’t live with myself, there must be two of me, the ‘I’ and the ‘self’.This thought and the impact of pursuing what it means are at the heart of what the book explores; the means to stand outside the thinking-self and observe, to be a watcher. A key thrust of the book is that thinking, the ability to think, represents a key advance for mankind, but like all advances can become a ball and chain preventing further advances. Eckhart proposes that our current thinking represents a level of development which should now be replaced by a more advanced ability. Indeed his frequent references to Buddha, Zen masters and others indicate that this transformation has been signposted for some time and may be long overdue.As Eckhart says, he can tell the reader nothing that they don’t already know. I suspect that five years ago I may not have read beyond the first five pages, if indeed I had ever picked the book up. Now this book is one I’d like to recommend everyone to read. I wouldn’t, simply because as I wasn’t, many may not be ready for it. For some the language may be too ‘new-age’. It is important to recognise that the words are symbols for ideas, even so I found that to some I attached personal meaning and consequently found them grate. The underlying ideas when I was able to see them were however deeply profound.It is impossible to attempt a summary, but to provide a glimpse of the transition beyond current thinking and its applicability to change. Eckhart refers to research identifying that ideas are not the product of thinking, but of some other process. We don’t get ideas by thinking, perhaps walking the dog, taking a bath, through physical exertion, but not by thinking. We actually get ideas when there is no thinking. What we need is not more thinking, but less. Less thinking, but better controlled, focussed use of our minds. He goes on to describe our minds as in uncontrolled overdrive, processing thoughts in a random and ad hoc manner. It’s as if in our mind we each posses a super computer, but the program controlling it is written by chance rather than being written by ourselves as computer programmers. Thus events, situations and experience each form part of the programme and our thinking as a result begins to constrict understanding which in many ways limits, rather than extends what we may achieve. Our thinking builds attachments to our past and restrictions on our future and avoids the present moment, the Now.Eckhart then begins to develop the means by which we can take control of our thinking and rather than be described by behaviours that result from this ad hoc programming, what we do connects with what we are. The consequences of this transformation are wide ranging and dramatic.The book deals with what are extremely challenging ideas in a way that is remarkably accessible and uplifting. The format follows the style of a dialogue between a questioner and Eckhart's responses, which aids the accessibility by allowing the questions the reader may have, to be posed on their behalf.I highly recommend that you read this book. If you find it impenetrable, then put it on the bookshelf with a reminder to return on each anniversary to try again. Once you have read it, you will need a reminder to reread it, as each time you do you will learn more. A remarkable work.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
DO NOT get the audio version. Read by the author & it shouldn't have been. Very mono tone, grating voice. Best to get a paper copy and just read it. (We did both & got a lot more out of reading it...)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One could quibble, perhaps, with this or that. But when it comes right down to it, it's the simple truth.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
There are some decent things in this book, but unfortunatley Tolle seems so taken with his own discoveries that he has little ability to see beyond. As far as it goes, this is good stuff. It just does not go very far. If you like Tolle, I really recommend Richard Ross's The Mandala of Being, which I am halfway through, but which brings new treasures on each page; unlike Tolle, who never said much new past the introduction.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn’t find it as easy to read as was stated. Some concepts I totally agreed with, some I argue are wrong and others I didn’t understand. Since I make these judgments from my mind, I suspect I’ll wait a few months and then read it again.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I understand that many others have learned a lot from this book, and while I don't want to belittle their experiences, I find Tolle's brand of mystical hoohah unenchanting. As far as I can glean, he has absolutely no authority from which to be writing his books, except that he once experienced a great deal of anxiety and has learned how to deal with it. Instead of focusing on practical strategies, he employs a method of constantly pointing to an achievable future (an interesting contradiction with the book's central message of focusing on the "now"): he always says, "You can't understand being; it's too big. But someday, you can." It is helpful to think about how we let our minds obsess over past events and future possibilities, but that is one of the only practical nuggets this book emphasizes, and still, he cites this as more of a conceptual/life lesson than as part of a coherent practice. For people interested in this type of message, I'd recommend all of Thict Nhat Hahn's books; Hahn focuses on practical behaviors and strategies people can use in order to become more mindful throughout their daily lives. Having lived in monasteries since his teenage years, lived in exile for many of his years, opened a center dedicated to mindfulness, and practiced his beliefs for a lifetime, I see him as a much more grounded teacher, one who is putting his publications' reapings to great societal use, rather than personal profit.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Life changing viewpointsread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm sure this book has a lot of amazing reviews and I doubt I could write a praise that has not already been raised about this work. I took a long time to pick this particular book up, but I'm glad I did because the author has a gift in the way e explains what are often difficult concepts to master or understand. I don't know if I agree with or believe everything he states in this book, but I am willing to give some of it a try and see where it takes me. I suppose if you take one thing away from the book it would be to practice the ability to bring yourself fully in the present throughout each day. This is one of those books you can buy and read but won't be particularly meaningful for you unless your at a place in which you are open and ready for it. Anyhow, I cannot recommend it high enough.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The key to joy, and feeling connected to the source. Told in black and white terms by a man who won't coddle you, and will not hear excuses. This is my Bible. It's like a Zep song: With every listen/reading, you learn something new.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
On rereading, this book impresses me more than ever. Tolle has taken common therapy/Buddhist issues and given them life in a nondramatic way. His explication of the pain-body is the best ever and makes that part of human psychology accessible. A must-read for any humans.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mr Tolle expounds a Timeless Truth realized by many Masters in different ways. It is an excellent book to start you on your Spiritual journey. The timeless NOW is YOU! Now is not to be equated with the present moment. NOW is before the present moment. The present is in Time-as in Past, Present, Future. Without NOW (YOU) where is Time! Now is the foundation of Time. He brings it out beautifully, if you manage to understand it. Read the book as often as you can such that its message permeates your way of perceiving the world.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a wonderful book that can really transform your way of thinking. It just doesn't happen overnight and takes some practice. I'd highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to get the best out of life!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great starting place for those seeking to overcome their mind created hardships. This book served as a stepping stone to a much more spirtual path for me. Prior to this spirtuality was something I felt was for people who needed answers from someone else, this helped me realize that sprituality was something I could find inside of myself.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book just wasn't for me. Tolle's writing style did not work to keep me interested. Granted, it was a topic that didn't interest me much, I gave it a try due to outside forces.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you want to change your life read this book, it will challenge you and make you look at yourself in a new light. Fantasic.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Excelente, es lo que he buscado por el tiempo de vida que llevo.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
es muy bueno
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
maybe i'm just not ready for this right now but it seemed kinda a)preachy b)common sense. might come back to it one day.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Eckhart Tolle is MISSING a huge bulk of the population, people who have incessant thoughts (or even an occasional wandering thought) but CAN will their mind to empty at will when they're not agitated.Tolle jumped from a lower type of consciousness (inability to empty) to a higher type (no wandering thoughts at all) so he missed the interim type. But check the Yahoo TPON forum, many people there talk about emptying their mind when they try, as a result of reading this book. The book didn't change the consciousness type of these people. It's a 3rd type and Tolle simply missed it.Having said that it's arguably the best book about consciousness ever written. I love it and it influenced my thinking deeply.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It opened my eyes to a new world, it was my introduction to the Budha way of thinking without to break with my old system of thoughts. After this book was easy to understand another books.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a wonderful example of the fine line between mental illness and genius.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I think the problem with reading this book was that I read Tolle’s [A New Earth] first. When I got to this book, I knew what he was going to say. He said what I expected. You must learn to live in the present. You must learn to distinguish what is your ego speaking and then look upon your ego as an impediment to living in the “now”. Tolle said this over and over…and over.For someone beginning to learn about Eckhart Tolle’s philosophy (and this is not just his own philosophy, by the way), this may be a good starting point. The book is written in simple language and takes the form of questions and answers. It does try to address different kinds of solutions and has answers for the skeptic. I do know, from hearing Tolle speak on television, that he does not push his philosophy on people and allows people to learn about it from him only when they are ready.For people who say that this book is “too new agey”, I don’t find it that way. There is much about what Tolle speaks with which I agree. There is also, however, quite a bit with which I disagree. The best part of the book, I think, is that it gives readers a new way of handling issues that have occurred or will occur in their lives. If you don’t know anything about “the power of now”, by all means, start learning about it by reading this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Whilst tis book does provide an introduction to mindfulness it doesn't answer some of the fundamental challenges one may face in turning off the mind - and adopts a 'just do it' approach. It's bullish call to action is too much of a blunt instrument for me and further I think the book is really poorly written.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent book about being present. Tolle discusses how being attached to the past or the future can stop you from experiencing peace and joy, because you are 'in your head', and thus unconsious. You become fully consious by experiencing 'the now'. This is a great book about freedom, release and finding a way to be grounded and liberated despite the unavoidable threat of pain that exists in the world.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An excellent sleep aid.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm not a huge fan as I think Tolle recycles the wisdom from a lot of other folks. But he can be compelling.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The only moment we have is the present, and staying in the now brings peace and happiness. Dwelling in the past and future is illusionary. Lots of tangents emmenating from this premise.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Live in the Now, See from above. I read this at the same time I was reading The Lovely Bones. The two books compliment each other.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book showed me how to observe my thoughts (my ego) and how to be in the present moment. His teachings are true and by no means a new phenomenon. Tolle just adds to the spiritual readings available. I recommend this book to those who are searching for inner peace.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I believe this to be one of the most important spiritual works of our time. It sets out a practical guide to transcending many of the psychological difficulties and barriers that people face everywhere today irrespective of culture, age or background. It makes a very convincing argument for placing more emphasis on mindfulness and focusing on the here and now as a means to overcome much of the needless psychological suffering that we unwittingly heap on ourselves.Never has this message been more important than today, in a time when growing materialism and conflict create much havoc and pain.This book is written and delivered in a manner that will appeal to all people of all beliefs. It does not attach itself to any particular religion and could be of equal use to even the most ardent of atheists.Do not make the mistake of viewing it as just another self help book. This book changed my life and offers a common sensical and direct approach to age old spiritual questions that is nothing short of revolutionary. It is such texts that must play an important role in addressing spiritual matters whilst transcending the pitfalls of secularism and religious divide in a world where personal belief is endlessly diverse. Read it today.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a stunningly powerful book.I was attracted to the title as my work on organisational change had identified that organisations often chose to chase the illusion of best practice, an illusion created by a misunderstanding of time. I anticipated that the book may also explore this area. The book does this to a degree but has an emphasis on personal change.In the introduction Eckhart Tolle describes the origins of his thinking through a simple but powerful illustration, He talks of waking up with a feeling of deep loathing for the world and a deep sense of dread. The repeated thought that ‘I cannot live with myself’ leads to a sudden awareness of how peculiar this thought is. ‘Am I one or two?’ If I can’t live with myself, there must be two of me, the ‘I’ and the ‘self’.This thought and the impact of pursuing what it means are at the heart of what the book explores; the means to stand outside the thinking-self and observe, to be a watcher. A key thrust of the book is that thinking, the ability to think, represents a key advance for mankind, but like all advances can become a ball and chain preventing further advances. Eckhart proposes that our current thinking represents a level of development which should now be replaced by a more advanced ability. Indeed his frequent references to Buddha, Zen masters and others indicate that this transformation has been signposted for some time and may be long overdue.As Eckhart says, he can tell the reader nothing that they don’t already know. I suspect that five years ago I may not have read beyond the first five pages, if indeed I had ever picked the book up. Now this book is one I’d like to recommend everyone to read. I wouldn’t, simply because as I wasn’t, many may not be ready for it. For some the language may be too ‘new-age’. It is important to recognise that the words are symbols for ideas, even so I found that to some I attached personal meaning and consequently found them grate. The underlying ideas when I was able to see them were however deeply profound.It is impossible to attempt a summary, but to provide a glimpse of the transition beyond current thinking and its applicability to change. Eckhart refers to research identifying that ideas are not the product of thinking, but of some other process. We don’t get ideas by thinking, perhaps walking the dog, taking a bath, through physical exertion, but not by thinking. We actually get ideas when there is no thinking. What we need is not more thinking, but less. Less thinking, but better controlled, focussed use of our minds. He goes on to describe our minds as in uncontrolled overdrive, processing thoughts in a random and ad hoc manner. It’s as if in our mind we each posses a super computer, but the program controlling it is written by chance rather than being written by ourselves as computer programmers. Thus events, situations and experience each form part of the programme and our thinking as a result begins to constrict understanding which in many ways limits, rather than extends what we may achieve. Our thinking builds attachments to our past and restrictions on our future and avoids the present moment, the Now.Eckhart then begins to develop the means by which we can take control of our thinking and rather than be described by behaviours that result from this ad hoc programming, what we do connects with what we are. The consequences of this transformation are wide ranging and dramatic.The book deals with what are extremely challenging ideas in a way that is remarkably accessible and uplifting. The format follows the style of a dialogue between a questioner and Eckhart's responses, which aids the accessibility by allowing the questions the reader may have, to be posed on their behalf.I highly recommend that you read this book. If you find it impenetrable, then put it on the bookshelf with a reminder to return on each anniversary to try again. Once you have read it, you will need a reminder to reread it, as each time you do you will learn more. A remarkable work.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
DO NOT get the audio version. Read by the author & it shouldn't have been. Very mono tone, grating voice. Best to get a paper copy and just read it. (We did both & got a lot more out of reading it...)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
One could quibble, perhaps, with this or that. But when it comes right down to it, it's the simple truth.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
There are some decent things in this book, but unfortunatley Tolle seems so taken with his own discoveries that he has little ability to see beyond. As far as it goes, this is good stuff. It just does not go very far. If you like Tolle, I really recommend Richard Ross's The Mandala of Being, which I am halfway through, but which brings new treasures on each page; unlike Tolle, who never said much new past the introduction.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I didn’t find it as easy to read as was stated. Some concepts I totally agreed with, some I argue are wrong and others I didn’t understand. Since I make these judgments from my mind, I suspect I’ll wait a few months and then read it again.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I understand that many others have learned a lot from this book, and while I don't want to belittle their experiences, I find Tolle's brand of mystical hoohah unenchanting. As far as I can glean, he has absolutely no authority from which to be writing his books, except that he once experienced a great deal of anxiety and has learned how to deal with it. Instead of focusing on practical strategies, he employs a method of constantly pointing to an achievable future (an interesting contradiction with the book's central message of focusing on the "now"): he always says, "You can't understand being; it's too big. But someday, you can." It is helpful to think about how we let our minds obsess over past events and future possibilities, but that is one of the only practical nuggets this book emphasizes, and still, he cites this as more of a conceptual/life lesson than as part of a coherent practice. For people interested in this type of message, I'd recommend all of Thict Nhat Hahn's books; Hahn focuses on practical behaviors and strategies people can use in order to become more mindful throughout their daily lives. Having lived in monasteries since his teenage years, lived in exile for many of his years, opened a center dedicated to mindfulness, and practiced his beliefs for a lifetime, I see him as a much more grounded teacher, one who is putting his publications' reapings to great societal use, rather than personal profit.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Life changing viewpoints
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm sure this book has a lot of amazing reviews and I doubt I could write a praise that has not already been raised about this work. I took a long time to pick this particular book up, but I'm glad I did because the author has a gift in the way e explains what are often difficult concepts to master or understand. I don't know if I agree with or believe everything he states in this book, but I am willing to give some of it a try and see where it takes me. I suppose if you take one thing away from the book it would be to practice the ability to bring yourself fully in the present throughout each day. This is one of those books you can buy and read but won't be particularly meaningful for you unless your at a place in which you are open and ready for it. Anyhow, I cannot recommend it high enough.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The key to joy, and feeling connected to the source. Told in black and white terms by a man who won't coddle you, and will not hear excuses. This is my Bible. It's like a Zep song: With every listen/reading, you learn something new.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
On rereading, this book impresses me more than ever. Tolle has taken common therapy/Buddhist issues and given them life in a nondramatic way. His explication of the pain-body is the best ever and makes that part of human psychology accessible. A must-read for any humans.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mr Tolle expounds a Timeless Truth realized by many Masters in different ways. It is an excellent book to start you on your Spiritual journey. The timeless NOW is YOU! Now is not to be equated with the present moment. NOW is before the present moment. The present is in Time-as in Past, Present, Future. Without NOW (YOU) where is Time! Now is the foundation of Time. He brings it out beautifully, if you manage to understand it. Read the book as often as you can such that its message permeates your way of perceiving the world.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a wonderful book that can really transform your way of thinking. It just doesn't happen overnight and takes some practice. I'd highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to get the best out of life!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Great starting place for those seeking to overcome their mind created hardships. This book served as a stepping stone to a much more spirtual path for me. Prior to this spirtuality was something I felt was for people who needed answers from someone else, this helped me realize that sprituality was something I could find inside of myself.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book just wasn't for me. Tolle's writing style did not work to keep me interested. Granted, it was a topic that didn't interest me much, I gave it a try due to outside forces.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
If you want to change your life read this book, it will challenge you and make you look at yourself in a new light. Fantasic.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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