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From the Publisher

Enlightenment doesn't always come in the form we expect. It need not appear as a self-styled guru or a complicated theory measuring some mysterious quality. Sometimes it's as close as the chocolate Lab bounding happily through the backyard or the lovable terrier contentedly curled up in one's lap.

In the foreword to this thoughtful examination of enlightenment, Dr. Bernie Siegel sums it up: “Dogs are healers. They are enlightened. They seem to have figured out how to live beautifully so much better than we humans have.”
In these pages, distinctive black-and-white dog images by acclaimed animal photographer Zachary Folk are illuminated by captions of down-to-earth spiritual wisdom “from” the dogs to us, their often confused humans.

A delightful romp through canine philosophy, this charming collection celebrates the simple wisdom and that special combination of natural earthiness and subtle spirituality that characterize humankind's best friend.
Published: New World Library on
ISBN: 9781577319962
List price: $12.95
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