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From the Publisher

When a speech therapist who loves words and real estate decides to stop talking, her world is neither quiet nor less complicated. Love, friendship, psychology, and imagination work as a team in Eavesdropping. This quirky, fast-paced book raises eyebrows and questions, making it an excellent book club selection. It prompts readers to ask themselves how they define crazy and not settle for an easy answer.
Published: BookBaby on
ISBN: 9780984627615
List price: $9.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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