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No matter where you are on the organizational ladder, the odds are high that you've delivered a high-stakes presentation to your peers, your boss, your customers, or the general public. Presentation software is one of the few tools that requires professionals to think visually on an almost daily basis. But unlike verbal skills, effective visual expression is not easy, natural, or actively taught in schools or business training programs. slide:ology fills that void.

Written by Nancy Duarte, President and CEO of Duarte Design, the firm that created the presentation for Al Gore's Oscar-winning film, An Inconvenient Truth, this book is full of practical approaches to visual story development that can be applied by anyone. The book combines conceptual thinking and inspirational design, with insightful case studies from the world's leading brands. With slide:ology you'll learn to:

Connect with specific audiences Turn ideas into informative graphics Use sketching and diagramming techniques effectively Create graphics that enable audiences to process information easily Develop truly influential presentations Utilize presentation technology to your advantage

Millions of presentations and billions of slides have been produced -- and most of them miss the mark. slide:ology will challenge your traditional approach to creating slides by teaching you how to be a visual thinker. And it will help your career by creating momentum for your cause.

Published: O'Reilly Media, Inc. on
ISBN: 9780596154714
List price: $27.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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As has become typical of my reviews, I'll contrast what I expected from this book with what I actually got. It's becoming a rather tired method of reviewing books, so I'll try to can the technique after this.Anyway, I had hoped that this would be another way to set up presentations and would be an alternative to Presentation Zen (a good book, but I've grown tired of it). In a sense "Slide:ology" is an alternative, but it focuses a bit too much on the minute details of design for me. Entire chapters are dedicated to such things as background color, font, text, image placement and the like. All of these are worthwhile topics but my mind just doesn't work in those terms. The level of detail was, for someone with my brain composition, mind-numbing. This is, however, more my problem that Nancy Duarte's. If the intimate details of slide design are your thing, this would be an excellent book. I was just looking for something more general.more
Good companion to Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds. Slide:ology has a more nuts and bolts approach and more details than the latter. Lots of good examples. Worth the investment.more
Over the last year or so, I've been investigating aspects of presentation skills. My motivation has been to try and improve my slide design to make the data I present more easily assimilable. To an extent, my interest is sparked by the different types of presentation I'm increasingly asked to make. From detailed reports of my research, I have recently delivered slide-free talks, presentations to schools, and feel I should use presentation media to convey strategic concepts in my work environment.Books I've found interesting and/or useful in data presentation include the various books by Edward Tufte (reviewed elsewhere on this site), and one or two books outlining slide design, mostly useful in delivering concepts rather than data, such as Presentation Zen, and this book, Slide:ology.To my mind, this isn't a book to read from cover to cover, but a book to dip in and out of, reading sections. It's very informative on many aspects of slide design, including use of images, colour palettes and layout ratios. Sections also cover use of movement, animation, video and slide transitions all to add structure and story-telling to the presentations. it's a trove of excellent advice.I have a couple of criticisms and reservations- neither particularly severe. The general tone of the book comes over as a bit self-congratulatory (and back-slappy with Duarte's chums in the presentation design industry). Also, I find it's aimed mostly at the corporate customer - it's hard to see how many of the design precepts could be easily applied to the kind of technical presentations that I generally deliver. Nontheless, I think I'll pick up useful ideas.more
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Reviews

As has become typical of my reviews, I'll contrast what I expected from this book with what I actually got. It's becoming a rather tired method of reviewing books, so I'll try to can the technique after this.Anyway, I had hoped that this would be another way to set up presentations and would be an alternative to Presentation Zen (a good book, but I've grown tired of it). In a sense "Slide:ology" is an alternative, but it focuses a bit too much on the minute details of design for me. Entire chapters are dedicated to such things as background color, font, text, image placement and the like. All of these are worthwhile topics but my mind just doesn't work in those terms. The level of detail was, for someone with my brain composition, mind-numbing. This is, however, more my problem that Nancy Duarte's. If the intimate details of slide design are your thing, this would be an excellent book. I was just looking for something more general.more
Good companion to Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds. Slide:ology has a more nuts and bolts approach and more details than the latter. Lots of good examples. Worth the investment.more
Over the last year or so, I've been investigating aspects of presentation skills. My motivation has been to try and improve my slide design to make the data I present more easily assimilable. To an extent, my interest is sparked by the different types of presentation I'm increasingly asked to make. From detailed reports of my research, I have recently delivered slide-free talks, presentations to schools, and feel I should use presentation media to convey strategic concepts in my work environment.Books I've found interesting and/or useful in data presentation include the various books by Edward Tufte (reviewed elsewhere on this site), and one or two books outlining slide design, mostly useful in delivering concepts rather than data, such as Presentation Zen, and this book, Slide:ology.To my mind, this isn't a book to read from cover to cover, but a book to dip in and out of, reading sections. It's very informative on many aspects of slide design, including use of images, colour palettes and layout ratios. Sections also cover use of movement, animation, video and slide transitions all to add structure and story-telling to the presentations. it's a trove of excellent advice.I have a couple of criticisms and reservations- neither particularly severe. The general tone of the book comes over as a bit self-congratulatory (and back-slappy with Duarte's chums in the presentation design industry). Also, I find it's aimed mostly at the corporate customer - it's hard to see how many of the design precepts could be easily applied to the kind of technical presentations that I generally deliver. Nontheless, I think I'll pick up useful ideas.more
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