• book

From the Publisher

Francis Hammerton is arrested and convicted of involvement with a gang of confidence men--a charge of which he is entirely innocent--but escapes police custody when a cell door is left unlocked. He finds refuge at a nearby boarding house, but is arrested again when he discovers (and reports) the murdered body of an upstairs tenant--and then is unjustly accused of murder. The dead man had been suspected of a major bank fraud, and was being investigated by a private detective firm. Francis secures the services of Mr. Jellipot, whom his father had known, and although Jellipot isn't a criminal attorney, he agrees to handle the case. And then, piece by patient piece, the little solicitor begins fitting together the shadowy pieces of this complex series of crimes. But can he find the true culprit in time, and also get Francis exonerated of the offense for which he's already been convicted? An absolutely gripping crime novel from the 1930s!
Published: Wildside Press on
ISBN: 9781434443779
List price: $2.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Attic Murder by S. Fowler Wright
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

People
4 min read
Society

Mom-Turned-Private Investigator Sheila Wysocki Solving My Best Friend’s Murder

Sheila Wysocki saw a ghost. It had been two decades since the rape and murder of her friend and college roommate Angie Samota when she glimpsed her slain friend standing in the bedroom. “I know it sounds crazy,” says Wysocki, who was then a 41-year-old stay-at-home mother of two young boys. “But it was in the middle of the day. She was wearing one of her favorite skirts and she was smiling a big, huge smile.” The vision of her friend evaporated in seconds, but Wysocki couldn’t erase it from her mind, and all the life-changing pain and fear she’d felt on Oct. 13, 1984—the day Samota, 20, was ki
Newsweek
4 min read
Tech

How Smart Devices Like Your Fitbit Can Solve Crimes

A couple of decades ago, DNA tests were the frontier in solving crimes. But the array of devices we’re putting in our homes and on our bodies are quickly becoming a detective’s new best friend—at least while we still have detectives. Before long, artificial intelligence should be able to analyze the data pouring in from devices and nail criminals better than any human gumshoe. Time to develop a new TV show: CSI: Robots. Two recent, well-publicized cases have given us a glimpse of this future. One involved Amazon’s Echo device, which is driven by the company’s artificial intelligence software,
TIME
1 min read
Society

Nayib Bukele

Ioan Grillo In a barrio of San Salvador, Mayor Nayib Bukele stands on a renovated soccer pitch defending penalty kicks from a line of kids. Most are approaching the age when many local youths join feared street gangs, known here as maras. But Bukele is encouraging them to shoot balls instead of bullets. “We’re trying to challenge the gangs, not by repression but by competing to get the young people to our side,” says Bukele, 35. In 2015, the year Bukele came to power, El Salvador’s capital city suffered 514 homicides in an area with about 260,000 people, making it 11 times more lethal per he