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From the Publisher

As Crimson Romance celebrates its first anniversary, we honor those pioneers who helped shape the direction of romance novels for all of us. Suspense, mystery, paranormal activity, and love - always love - have been the cornerstone of the genre since the early 1970s. Now we have updated the covers to these classics - but not the words - and reissued these timeless reads to let you relive the thrill of discovering a world of romance all over again.

Florentine Death

High in the hills above Florence was the beautiful old Villa Paradiso - rambling, large, of rough stone smothered in vines - home of Barbara Loomis’s late great-aunt, the Contessa Mercedes d’Albiensi. Her imagination stirred by an unexpected bequest, Barbara feels compelled to visit the villa, and there she is warmly greeted by Mrs. Wadley, her great-aunt’s companion, by the handsome Gianni Monteverdi and his small niece Eleanora, by the Principe and Principessa Monteverdi . . .

But did they really want her there?

Death haunted the villa. First a dog dies, wantonly poisoned. Then Barbara becomes terribly ill. Is it possible that her great-aunt’s death was not an accident? And could it be that someone is trying to murder her, too?

Sensuality Level: Behind Closed Doors

Published: F&W, a Content and eCommerce Company on
ISBN: 9781440571992
List price: $4.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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