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From the Publisher

Developing countries reliant on aid want to escape this dependence, and yet they appear unable to do so. This book shows how they may liberate themselves from the aid that pretends to be developmental but is not and cautions countries of the South against falling into the aid trap and endorsing the collective colonialism of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). An exit strategy from aid dependence requires a radical shift in both the mindset and the development strategy of countries dependent on aid and a deeper and direct involvement of people in their own development. It also requires a radical restructuring of the global institutional aid architecture.
Published: Pambazuka Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9780857490490
List price: $13.99
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