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From the Publisher

A groundbreaking collection of essays by leading academics and intellectuals, this record examines the confiscation of Maori land in 19th-century New Zealand and the broader imperial context. Based on a 2008 conference entitled Coming to Terms? Raupatu/Confiscation and New Zealand History, this study examines topics associated with land confiscation, such as war, European settlements, colonialism, property rights, and politics. Contributors include Michael Allen, James Belich, Judith Binney, Alex Frame, Bryan Gilling, Mark Hickford, Vincent O’Malley, Dion Tuuta, Alan Ward, and John C. Weaver.

Published: Victoria University Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9780864736741
List price: $15.00
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