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From the Publisher

Targeting Web 2.0 IT professionals and developers, this important resource provides essential information on IBM’s Enterprise Generation Language (EGL) and the exciting new EGL Rich UI for the IBM i platform. The first half explains how the EGL Rich UI takes advantage of the powerful EGL syntax to provide increased flexibility while designing complex interactive user interfaces from the ground up. This can allow for building Rich Internet Applications that take advantage of popular frameworks such as Dojo and services from Google, all integrated together with EGL Rich UI’s built-in widget library. Following is an exploration into harnessing IBM i, the new open and advanced business application server, through EGL’s ability to make simple connections from rich clients to back end business services.
Published: MC Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781583476901
List price: $38.99
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