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This American classic has been corrected from the original manuscripts and indexed, featuring historic photographs and an extensive biographical afterword.

Topics: Race Relations, Civil and Political Rights, Discrimination, Segregation, American History, Civil Rights Movement, 1950s, American South, Creative Nonfiction, and Poignant

Published: Wings Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781609401085
List price: $14.95
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Oh My!!! The Last time I saw this actual book was at the age of 14yrs and our History Teacher in high school exchanged for 1 yr with an American History teacher. and so was our new subject of American History so much more to learn and the American Teacher had a particular kind nature he spoke quietly ,,sadly it made him criteria to being played with by the deviants of my class.. they would shout cruel jokes, and although i personally was seen as a high maintenance pupil.. with bad behavior..i swear i listened to every word of the history of america.. So Myself and this New American in my life..i had not met any american people..sad yea? We formed a close..(HEALTHY..nothingnegativeOK!!) relationship..and he saw i was truly absorbing all he taught..One insight was Black racism and how white Americans created segregated areas just to be protected by some stupid sign...or 2 foot high wall..or Blacks only use the cafe table OUTSIDE ..whites only inside the cafe..i ask you.. I got really upset..this particular insight on human behavior and just how deep racist living was ingrained into america states.. It was nothing better than how people due to just different skin colour were treated in slavery..
He watched my head go down.. emotionally i hurt and asked god..why humans choose freely to fuel racist hatred to people with dark skin? i could not make sense.. overwhelmingly caused by emotions to wither, and at the end of class i stayed seated..crying, secretly smothered my face, so no one would see.. Then My history teacher came to my desk.. and sat on the edge.. he asked me why i was so very upset?.. i told him i didnt realise just how cruel human beings can be..and all out of free will.. why hate a darker skin.. what had they done to people with oh so white skin? i told him i just cant take it in logically..
Then he quietly spoke and said " Hey look, Ive got a book , for you.. i brought alot of profound books more of actual events, but made american history.. "listen leona, if you stop crying, and wipe those tears away, i can show you a book that was very precious to me when younger, and i wanted to inspire children in UK to want to read..but they all seem focused on making lessons disruptive and insult me, but you? Leona i see that you are so focused on my voice and what im teaching, no noise seems to hinder you from listening to little old me..the american dude everyone laughs at...even other teachers..are rude." But you leona, i came to inspire.. and i have, even one person that shows eyes wide open engrossed and entwined within my story and topic.. I want to give you this book, as a gift".. i remeber looking up, and naturally, and kindly with all innocence, no darknes at al..he wiped one last tear from my cheek, and i took the worn ..well read book.. it was old and edited in 50/ re-edited 60`s.. called " BLACK LIKE ME" about a white reporterwho went to extreme measures and had a doctor give him a somewhat long session over a few months of injections that darkened his body`s pigment melanin, eventually turning his white skin Black.. throughout his whole experience he had to have injections to keep the pigment black... why you ask? as a white man with not one racist bone in his body/.. as a reporter and journalist he wanted to live like a black person and experience racist values from whites, and what it did to a mans soul to be an outcast upon this earth for just the darker colour of skin.. its an idiots idea that idiots caught onto and fueled out of greed.. Eleanor Roosavelt is one of my high respected women in history,, she once quoted "If A Million People Believe In A Foolish Thing.... It is STILL a Foolish Thing" .. that how he saw the whole of american life create a life of terrible and hate driven crimes, toward the african people. and treated their cattle with more affection... and i too.. could not quite except some high big class ugly fat greedy elite ignorant power hungry idiot, fool. stupid imbocile excuse as a human shouted a abusive reacttion and created some mass hysteria of elite little bastards who still live in the world.. but now??? how they hide, an fear exposure.. karma eh?
Don`t allow these people who live their life filled with hate and disrespect bitter twisted souls, who are maybe young but so very doomed at their time of demise..
If you read this book.. it will teach you to see beyond hate and cruelty and attitudes, no god is part of..
It will help you focus on something maybe blurred due to mayhem and dust of commotion in some unnecessary war in another country white people seem to think they own..
You will begin to look at life objectively and learn to seperate emotion and logic. Use and keep all you learn in your logical world..and respect the emotional feelings like now, as a deep understanding to a world that SHOULD have been.. but a small dark seed grew into a virus injection called GREED.. its caused more war death famine genocide..misery extreme.. because mankind is never satisfied with all they have, and feel it a right to take however they see fit,
He took a pen from the table and actually wrote, To Leona, an inspired pupil that i wanted to meet in a different part of my world. love grow learn and stay humble to your insight and wisdom, for the fool forever gloats and brags of his knowlesge, while the wise man sits silently and listens.. Lawrence Mantrarin (5th Grade American History Teacher) 1982 more
Excellent book, a profound look at racial issues Griffin experienced while assimilating himself as a black man in the South, 1952.more
As most everybody should already know, a man named John Griffin disguised himself as a black person and traveled around the Deep South late in 1959. He was able to intimately understand the divide people are faced with on both sides. He completely immersed himself in his role, thinking, feeling and experiencing everything as a black man. His writing is very insightful and so sad. Having been born in 1981 and having lived in Minnesota my whole life, I have never really understood what this situation in our country was like. Though we have made great strides towards equality and justice, there are still folks down where my dad lives in South Carolina that have similar attitudes to the whites encountered by Griffin in his book. Each generation gets a little better, and I agree with Griffin's point that it is only through education, knowledge, empathy and love that this shameful attitude can be completely demolished. This is an important book, even still today, for everyone to read. It reminds us that those times were not long ago and that there is still work to be done in this arena.more
Interesting book. I would like to know more about the drug he took to turn black. The book is a little dated but has merit.more
Read all 27 reviews

Reviews

Oh My!!! The Last time I saw this actual book was at the age of 14yrs and our History Teacher in high school exchanged for 1 yr with an American History teacher. and so was our new subject of American History so much more to learn and the American Teacher had a particular kind nature he spoke quietly ,,sadly it made him criteria to being played with by the deviants of my class.. they would shout cruel jokes, and although i personally was seen as a high maintenance pupil.. with bad behavior..i swear i listened to every word of the history of america.. So Myself and this New American in my life..i had not met any american people..sad yea? We formed a close..(HEALTHY..nothingnegativeOK!!) relationship..and he saw i was truly absorbing all he taught..One insight was Black racism and how white Americans created segregated areas just to be protected by some stupid sign...or 2 foot high wall..or Blacks only use the cafe table OUTSIDE ..whites only inside the cafe..i ask you.. I got really upset..this particular insight on human behavior and just how deep racist living was ingrained into america states.. It was nothing better than how people due to just different skin colour were treated in slavery..
He watched my head go down.. emotionally i hurt and asked god..why humans choose freely to fuel racist hatred to people with dark skin? i could not make sense.. overwhelmingly caused by emotions to wither, and at the end of class i stayed seated..crying, secretly smothered my face, so no one would see.. Then My history teacher came to my desk.. and sat on the edge.. he asked me why i was so very upset?.. i told him i didnt realise just how cruel human beings can be..and all out of free will.. why hate a darker skin.. what had they done to people with oh so white skin? i told him i just cant take it in logically..
Then he quietly spoke and said " Hey look, Ive got a book , for you.. i brought alot of profound books more of actual events, but made american history.. "listen leona, if you stop crying, and wipe those tears away, i can show you a book that was very precious to me when younger, and i wanted to inspire children in UK to want to read..but they all seem focused on making lessons disruptive and insult me, but you? Leona i see that you are so focused on my voice and what im teaching, no noise seems to hinder you from listening to little old me..the american dude everyone laughs at...even other teachers..are rude." But you leona, i came to inspire.. and i have, even one person that shows eyes wide open engrossed and entwined within my story and topic.. I want to give you this book, as a gift".. i remeber looking up, and naturally, and kindly with all innocence, no darknes at al..he wiped one last tear from my cheek, and i took the worn ..well read book.. it was old and edited in 50/ re-edited 60`s.. called " BLACK LIKE ME" about a white reporterwho went to extreme measures and had a doctor give him a somewhat long session over a few months of injections that darkened his body`s pigment melanin, eventually turning his white skin Black.. throughout his whole experience he had to have injections to keep the pigment black... why you ask? as a white man with not one racist bone in his body/.. as a reporter and journalist he wanted to live like a black person and experience racist values from whites, and what it did to a mans soul to be an outcast upon this earth for just the darker colour of skin.. its an idiots idea that idiots caught onto and fueled out of greed.. Eleanor Roosavelt is one of my high respected women in history,, she once quoted "If A Million People Believe In A Foolish Thing.... It is STILL a Foolish Thing" .. that how he saw the whole of american life create a life of terrible and hate driven crimes, toward the african people. and treated their cattle with more affection... and i too.. could not quite except some high big class ugly fat greedy elite ignorant power hungry idiot, fool. stupid imbocile excuse as a human shouted a abusive reacttion and created some mass hysteria of elite little bastards who still live in the world.. but now??? how they hide, an fear exposure.. karma eh?
Don`t allow these people who live their life filled with hate and disrespect bitter twisted souls, who are maybe young but so very doomed at their time of demise..
If you read this book.. it will teach you to see beyond hate and cruelty and attitudes, no god is part of..
It will help you focus on something maybe blurred due to mayhem and dust of commotion in some unnecessary war in another country white people seem to think they own..
You will begin to look at life objectively and learn to seperate emotion and logic. Use and keep all you learn in your logical world..and respect the emotional feelings like now, as a deep understanding to a world that SHOULD have been.. but a small dark seed grew into a virus injection called GREED.. its caused more war death famine genocide..misery extreme.. because mankind is never satisfied with all they have, and feel it a right to take however they see fit,
He took a pen from the table and actually wrote, To Leona, an inspired pupil that i wanted to meet in a different part of my world. love grow learn and stay humble to your insight and wisdom, for the fool forever gloats and brags of his knowlesge, while the wise man sits silently and listens.. Lawrence Mantrarin (5th Grade American History Teacher) 1982 more
Excellent book, a profound look at racial issues Griffin experienced while assimilating himself as a black man in the South, 1952.more
As most everybody should already know, a man named John Griffin disguised himself as a black person and traveled around the Deep South late in 1959. He was able to intimately understand the divide people are faced with on both sides. He completely immersed himself in his role, thinking, feeling and experiencing everything as a black man. His writing is very insightful and so sad. Having been born in 1981 and having lived in Minnesota my whole life, I have never really understood what this situation in our country was like. Though we have made great strides towards equality and justice, there are still folks down where my dad lives in South Carolina that have similar attitudes to the whites encountered by Griffin in his book. Each generation gets a little better, and I agree with Griffin's point that it is only through education, knowledge, empathy and love that this shameful attitude can be completely demolished. This is an important book, even still today, for everyone to read. It reminds us that those times were not long ago and that there is still work to be done in this arena.more
Interesting book. I would like to know more about the drug he took to turn black. The book is a little dated but has merit.more
John Griffin dyes and medicates himself black before plunging into the Jim Crow South of 1960. His experiences as a black man - and a white - inform this book, which remains remarkable, though not astonishing, some fifty years later.Of course, the idea of a white person trying to appropriate black experience in this way would set teeth on edge in 2011 - and rightly so. But postmodernism and its effect on political discourse and sociology was still inchoate. Griffin is motivated from a sympathy for the plight of "the Negro" and also curiousity as to the difference between black and white in the south.The gulf proves far wider than he could imagine, in all its dehumanising, destructive power. It's quite interesting: the genre of 'undercover journalist' is extremely common these days, but beyond a few writers like George Orwell and Jack London, Griffin had no real template to follow and his prose eschews the factual, reportage-based journalese we've come to expect from these books. Rather, it's a heady, ardent fever-dream.This gives the book an almost nightmarish quality - Griffin isn't simply slapping on a mask, he is transforming his identity, literally and figuratively, and it accompanies an horrific transformation in the South as he had previously experienced it. In this respect, the book reads like a kind of descent into the underworld; there is an almost mythic quality to Griffin's experiment and Black Like Me abounds with fearsome monsters and villains, and titanic heroes.But it's all - amazingly, horrifyingly - real. I don't want to imply there is nothing more to this book than an impressionistic grand guignol - Griffin does document the daily, myriad struggles he faces as a black man, and he often does it without hyperbole. He doesn't need to; it speaks for itself.There are some weaknesses, however. The trail-blazing nature of the book necessarily means some missteps, and Griffin is over-eager to ascribe motivations and thoughts to his "fellow" Negroes, the antagonistic whites, and the other people he comes across. Yet the experience still speaks for itself. Griffin's willingness to immolate his own identity and privilege in order to highlight a terrible injustice is admirable, and difficult to ignore. It's not often that a book is so much more than the sum of its parts. Even if you think find this slim volume disappointing, or too light on facts and heavy on emotion, it transcends these textual quibbles. Black Like Me is fascinating, educational, disturbing and actually quite uplifting in a way, as book. But as an historical document - both as a seminal step in a genre, a powerful record of institutionalised racism, and a resounding clarion call to whites not in or aware of the then-nascent civil rights movement, it is in a class of its own.more
I am not really sure I can 'rate' this book at this point in my life. I would imagine it would be rather outdated though perhaps the writing itself has held up? I do know that I read it in high school and it greatly influenced my view of race (doesn't exist, though ethnicity does, as well as bigotry and prejudice), US history and justice. It was a great book to have thrown at a kid and I appreciate having been struck by it.more
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