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From the Publisher

Simple, practical marketing ideas, most of which can be implemented at low cost, are provided in this source of inspiration for small business owners who want to be proactive about marketing their business. All of the marketing techniques are proven and used around the world, yet they do not require a lot of time or special skills. This book helps professionals identify how to create customer loyalty programs, generate free word-of-mouth advertising, promote their business from the outside in, develop a strong corporate image, and get results fast. Business owners are encouraged to implement one idea from the book per week, so that in one year 52 new ideas will have been developed, increasing greatly the potential for more customers and profits.
Published: Allen Unwin an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781741760842
List price: $9.99
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