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From the Publisher

Conspiracy theories are all here, but not just lined up to be ridiculed and dismissed. For among the absurd conspiracy theories currently proliferating on the internet, there are nuggets of real research about real conspiracies waiting to be mined. Fully sourced and referenced, this book is a serious examination of a fascinating phenomenon.
Published: Oldcastle Books an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781842438190
List price: $13.99
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