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From the Publisher

Published to coincide with the film's 50th anniversary in 2013, the first book-length treatment on the production of this modernist masterpiece

 

Featuring new interviews with stars Rod Taylor, Tippi Hedren, and Veronica Cartwright, as well as sketches and storyboards from Hitchcock's A-list technical team, Robert Boyle, Albert Whitlock, and Harold Michelson, the book charts every aspect of the film's production all set against the tumultuous backdrop of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis and JFK's presidency. Using unpublished material from the Alfred Hitchcock Collection, Evan Hunter's files, Peggy Robertson's papers, and Robert Boyle's artwork, this is the ultimate guide to Hitchcock's most ambitious film. This book analyzes the film's modernist underpinnings, from art director Robert Boyle's initial sketches influenced by Munch's The Scream, to the groundbreaking electronic score by pioneering German composers Remi Gassmann and Oskar Sala. There is also a time line detailing the film's production to its release at MOMA in New York, and the 1963 Cannes Film Festival.

Published: Oldcastle Books an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781842439555
List price: $14.99
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