• book

From the Publisher

When C.H. Sisson was 20, he gave up writing poems. He began once more in his 30s under the stress of war-time, stationed in India. Verse came intermittently, exiguously; the bulk of his early writing in translation, prose essays, and fiction. One of the few direct English heirs of the great Modernists, Sisson is a poet who grounds the enormous energies of that movement in English landscapes—especially those of Somerset—and reconciles the legacies of Eliot and Pound on the one hand and of Hardy and Edward Thomas on the other. This updated volume updates and corrects the poet's previous works and demonstrates his confidence vis a vis the poetic genre.
Published: Carcanet Press Ltd. an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781847776273
List price: $40.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Collected Poems
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

New York Magazine
1 min read

The Controversial Rachel Cusk

MOST DIVISIVE A Life’s Work (2001) Cusk’s elegy for her pre-motherhood self infuriates mothers and critics alike. “This isn’t what it’s like to have a baby; it’s what it’s like for a depressed and melodramatic novelist to have a baby.” (THE SUNDAY TIMES) Aftermath (2012) An unsentimental look at her divorce from her stay-at-home husband. “This is writerly greed, swooping on everything and wringing meaning from it, transforming it into something else rather than just letting it be.” (THE GUARDIAN) “Every experience, from having a tooth extracted to Cusk’s daughters’ hamsters’ inability to
Literary Hub
1 min read

Eileen Myles on the Most Interesting Nights of Their Life

In this video in support of the Festival Neue Literatur, which celebrates contemporary German-language and American fiction (this year’s theme: Queer as Volk) and begins today in New York, Eileen Myles talks about the importance of translators and FNL. “The most interesting nights of my life have been when I’ve sat down with a table of translators, because they are the most sophisticated people I know,” Myles says, which is certainly saying something, coming from a poet this legendary. They also mention the political urgency of festivals like FNL, which are important in part because of the way
The Atlantic
5 min read

Why Walt Whitman Called America the 'Greatest Poem'

Shocked at the election of their next president, many Americans at the end of 2016 turned to social media, petitions, polls, and the streets in protest. A century and a half ago, shocked at the assassination of the sitting president who oversaw the reunification of a divided nation, Walt Whitman turned to poetry. In “O Captain! My Captain!”, Whitman famously eulogized Abraham Lincoln as the fallen leader of the great ship of America, which he called a “vessel grim and daring.” But for Whitman, poetry wasn’t just a vehicle for expressing political lament; it was also a political force in itself