• book
    0% of Eroticism and Death in Theatre and Performance completed

From the Publisher

Exploring a range of topics, including Greek tragedy, Shakespearean theater, contemporary British plays, opera, and the theatricality of Parisian culture, this compilation provides new perspectives on the relationship between Eros and Death in a series of dramatic texts, theatrical practices, and cultural performances. Detailed and analytical, these informative essays demonstrate how changing attitudes towards sexuality and deathopposed but entangled passionswere reflected in theater throughout the course of history. Psychoanalytical and philosophical models are also referenced in this work that features essays from dramatists Dic Edwards, David Ian Rabey, and David Rudkin.

Published: University of Hertfordshire Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781907396281
List price: $29.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Eroticism and Death in Theatre and Performance
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

New York Magazine
2 min read

Our Theater Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

ALL THE WAYS TO SAY I LOVE YOU PREVIEWS BEGIN SEPT. 6 There will be lots of TV and movie stars onstage this fall (Daniel Craig, Liev Schreiber, Josh Groban), but the one I’m most excited to see is Judith Light, a perennial supporting actress onstage (with two Tony Awards) and onscreen (Transparent). In Neil LaBute’s latest drama, about a teacher’s relationship to a former student, she’s not only the star but the whole cast. WHAT DID YOU EXPECT? AND WOMEN OF A CERTAIN AGE PREVIEWS BEGIN SEPT. 10 AND NOV. 4 Parts two and three of Richard Nelson’s trilogy about the Gabriel family of upstate
TIME
2 min read

When Less Plot Is Actually More

AFTER WRITING SEVEN NOVELS AND three works of nonfiction, acclaimed British author Rachel Cusk began to find fiction “fake and embarrassing.” Two years ago, she explained to a British newspaper, “Once you have suffered sufficiently, the idea of making up John and Jane and having them do things together seems utterly ridiculous.” No surprise, then, that her 2014 novel Outline was anything but plot-driven. It was more like a series of observations by a narrator as she traveled to Greece to teach writing. The people she met along the way essentially became the subjects of miniature profiles craf
The Atlantic
8 min read
Psychology

The Best Writing Advice of 2016

2016 was not an easy year to be a writer. Not just because of the constant, concentration-wrecking pull of our devices, their glowing screens beckoning with the promise of fresh horrors. I’ve spoken with many writers, in recent months, who seem to be facing a deeper, starker crisis of purpose since the election of Donald Trump. They’re asking themselves: Is making literature an acceptable pursuit in a world with such urgent, tangible needs? And if so, how should I use my words? It’s a deeply personal line of questioning, and I can’t supply any answers here—I’m still working things out for myse