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From the Publisher

Breaking open a fascinating new dialogue on the situation in occupied Palestinian territories, this personal account presents a South African perspective that is complemented by striking color photographs. Author and photographer Mats Svensson began work in Jerusalem with Swedish development assistance and quickly realized that the world he had wandered into was far worse off than what he had read. Through the lens of his camera and captured in his own words, he documents the daily horrors that he witnessed during long treks through occupied territory. This chronicle provides valuable depth to an issue that news articles abroad only scratch the surface of—what it is truly like to live amidst the Israeli–Palestinian conflict.

Published: Real African Publishers an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781920655211
List price: $32.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
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