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From the Publisher

In a newly revised fourth edition, this invaluable resource takes an in-depth look into the new American dream: running one’s own e-business from home. Starting with a guide to defining what is most importanttime with family, a flexible schedule, financial freedom, and risk levels. This study moves into an investigation of how online business works, followed by profiles of 101 proven ideas guaranteed to fuel entrepreneurial thinking. This e-business handbook also includes invaluable information on getting started with online and offline promotion and the included password provides access to the companion website, which offers the latest internet business news, expanded information, and additional online resources.

Topics: Social Media, Blogs, The Internet, Advertising, Career, Entrepreneurship, Success, and Guides

Published: Maximum Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781931644921
List price: $23.95
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