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From the Publisher

Confronting an illness that affects an estimated 10 million American women, this jargon-free reference sheds light on the commonplace ailment of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The symptoms of this hormonal disorder are explored in detail, including irregular menstrual cycles, excess facial and body hair, weight gain, and adult acne. Identifying the affliction as the leading cause of infertility, this study also investigates the long-term risks of leaving the condition untreated, such as endometrial cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and stroke. Penned by an expert physician and two women who are living with PCOS, this analysis provides a much-needed examination of an under-reported, under-diagnosed malady. Additional topics covered include causes and triggers, overcoming symptoms, choosing a physician, getting a correct diagnosis, receiving the best medical treatment, infertility and pregnancy complications, and coping with the emotional impact.
Published: Addicus Books an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781936374533
List price: $9.99
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