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From the Publisher

In this wide-ranging collection of essays, Richard Lederer offers readers more of the irrepressible wordplay and linguistic high jinks his fans can't get enough of, along with observations on a life in letters. From an inner-city classroom to a wordy weekend retreat, from centuries-old etymological legacies to the latest in slang, dialects, and fadspeak, these essays transport, inform, and entertain as only Lederer can. The book includes more than 30 chapters, such as A Declaration of Linguistic Independence, Our Uppity English Language, Etymological Snapshots, and Jest for the Pun of It.

Topics: Essays, Language, Funny, and Informative

Published: Marion Street Press an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781936863426
List price: $9.99
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