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From the Publisher

In another contemporary classic, Katie covers the essence of the mandala: its origin, design, and construction in quilts. Once again, her artistic principles could be applied to many media, but they are particularly fascinating in quilts.

Topics: Quilting, Design, Needlework, Sewing, Crafts, Informative, Guides, Prescriptive, How-To Guides, and Illustrated

Published: C&T Publishing, Inc. an imprint of NBN Books on
ISBN: 9781607056980
List price: $10.99
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