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From the Publisher

With all the information you need to use your polytunnel to its full potential, this book shows make the most of this precious covered space. It includes a detailed crop-by-crop guide to the growing year, dedicated chapters on growing for each season, and a sowing and harvesting calendar to help with planning. You'll be harvesting fresh crops all year round—sweet potatoes and late celery in November; winter radish, baby carrots, and celeriac in early February; and salad leaves right through the winter. Even during the “hungry gap” you'll have a choice of new potatoes, pak choi, peas, tender cabbages, beetroot, and more with the help of this essential guide.

Published: UIT Cambridge Ltd. an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9780857840097
List price: $12.99
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