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From the Publisher

With 10 years of additional research on early childhood music, neurology, and language, this updated edition of Music Learning Theory for Newborn and Young Children focuses on the most critical learning period in every individual’s musical life: birth to age five. The book explains how young children audiate and develop an understanding of music—and why they should experience music as early as possible. Edwin Gordon, a leading educator and researcher in music education, guides readers in the ways to motivate and encourage young children to audiate, revealing how to teach music successfully at home and in preschool, with an emphasis on individual differences between children. This edition includes a new chapter on imitating and organizing a music preschool as well as new songs and rhythm chants written by Gordon.

Published: Gia Publications an imprint of Independent Publishers Group on
ISBN: 9781622770335
List price: $26.99
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