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A sci-fi classic returns to print in its true, best, and original form!

With renewed interest in Alexander Key's extraordinary 1968 novel, fans can dive into Escape to Witch Mountain as it was meant to be read. The powerful, thrilling story of Tony and Tiatwins joined by their paranormal gifts, on the run from evil forces that seek to suppress their forgotten pastsis more gripping and relevant than ever.

Praise for Escape to Witch Mountain:

"Action, mood, and characterization never falter in this superior science fiction novel…"
Library Journal

"Fantasy, science fiction, mystery, adventurethe story is all of these, with enough suspense and thrills to keep young readers glued to its pages from first to last."
Book World

"Fascinating science fiction."
Elementary School Library Collection, Bro-Dart Foundation

Topics: Aliens

Published: Sourcebooks on Aug 1, 2009
ISBN: 9781402249815
List price: $8.99
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I read this as part of keeping track of everything my children were reading; it was published a bit too late for me to read it as the intended audience though I do remember reading another of his books, The Forgotten Door. Thankfully, I've missed the allegedly horrible Disney adaptations of this book into film.Though a bit dated politically and culturally, I still found it an enjoyable book. The basic plot of "children with special abilities need to escape the bad guys who want to exploit them and get home" is still enjoyable despite having been used before. The story is well enough written and the characters endearing.A gentle book that won't frighten children, a simple introduction to science fiction if you want your children to try that genre, it's worth a read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I had fond memories of having read this as a kid, but a recent revisiting as bed time reading for my eight year old daughter left me moderately disappointed. The basic concept has promise, but the storytelling is clumsy, the characters unbelievable, and the ethical landscape a bit too black and white. With the notable and unexplained exception of the unlikely Father O'Day, humanity is depicted as a greedy, sorry, miserable lot.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I like this storyline quite a lot. I watched the movies and I wanted to read what the author original author said before Disney got a hold of it. The first half and second half of the book are almost like two different books --- to the point where I started wondering if they were written at different times. This book suffers from the extremely low expectations of kids in the 1960's when it was written. The writing is very tight and straight, in fact, too tight and straight in my opinion. The author never seems to take a side trip to fully characterize any of the secondary characters and in the first half, the characters are kind of cardboard'ish. In the second half of the book things improve dramatically as the author seems to learn the art of **effective** suspense. Plus the last half contains much more adventure which you can eventually engage with as the characters travel through the countryside and forests trying to escape their pursuers. The villian could have used a first class characterization but he is more like a plot puppet. For two pages, the author hits a hard anticommunist and anticapitalist/environmentalist theme, but the duration of it is pretty short. It's just a sign of the times of the era the novel was written in. If you read this novel nostalgically remembering the times it was written in, it's a good read. If you want to read it as a modern novel, then you will find it shallow and too simple for most modern middle school readers.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

I read this as part of keeping track of everything my children were reading; it was published a bit too late for me to read it as the intended audience though I do remember reading another of his books, The Forgotten Door. Thankfully, I've missed the allegedly horrible Disney adaptations of this book into film.Though a bit dated politically and culturally, I still found it an enjoyable book. The basic plot of "children with special abilities need to escape the bad guys who want to exploit them and get home" is still enjoyable despite having been used before. The story is well enough written and the characters endearing.A gentle book that won't frighten children, a simple introduction to science fiction if you want your children to try that genre, it's worth a read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I had fond memories of having read this as a kid, but a recent revisiting as bed time reading for my eight year old daughter left me moderately disappointed. The basic concept has promise, but the storytelling is clumsy, the characters unbelievable, and the ethical landscape a bit too black and white. With the notable and unexplained exception of the unlikely Father O'Day, humanity is depicted as a greedy, sorry, miserable lot.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I like this storyline quite a lot. I watched the movies and I wanted to read what the author original author said before Disney got a hold of it. The first half and second half of the book are almost like two different books --- to the point where I started wondering if they were written at different times. This book suffers from the extremely low expectations of kids in the 1960's when it was written. The writing is very tight and straight, in fact, too tight and straight in my opinion. The author never seems to take a side trip to fully characterize any of the secondary characters and in the first half, the characters are kind of cardboard'ish. In the second half of the book things improve dramatically as the author seems to learn the art of **effective** suspense. Plus the last half contains much more adventure which you can eventually engage with as the characters travel through the countryside and forests trying to escape their pursuers. The villian could have used a first class characterization but he is more like a plot puppet. For two pages, the author hits a hard anticommunist and anticapitalist/environmentalist theme, but the duration of it is pretty short. It's just a sign of the times of the era the novel was written in. If you read this novel nostalgically remembering the times it was written in, it's a good read. If you want to read it as a modern novel, then you will find it shallow and too simple for most modern middle school readers.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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