• book

From the Publisher

The newly updated "Content-Based Curriculum for High-Ability Learners" provides a solid introduction to curriculum development in gifted and talented education. Written by experts in the field of gifted education, this text uses cutting-edge design techniques and aligns the core content with national and state standards. In addition to a revision of the original chapters, the second edition contains new chapters on topics such as teaching research skills to gifted students, second language learning, leadership, arts curriculum, and technology. The text is divided into three sections. The first section identifies the basic principles of curriculum development: accelerated learning within the core content areas, use of higher order process skills, development of creative student products, and concept development and learning. The second section incorporates these techniques into a chapter on each core content area: language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. The third section focuses on the roles of teachers, program coordinators, and administrators during curriculum design: selecting resources and materials, making appropriate instructional choices, and assessing student learning.
Published: Sourcebooks on
ISBN: 9781593635282
List price: $120.00
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for Content-Based Curriculum for High-Ability Learners
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

The Atlantic
8 min read

Can Grade-Skipping Close the STEM Gender Gap?

Jane Charlton never intended to skip high school. “I was planning on just skipping ninth grade,” says the renowned astrophysicist, who spent her summers taking calculus classes at Carnegie Mellon University. “But when the school year was about to start, the teachers went on strike and my math professor said, ‘Why don't you just start here?’” Three years later, Charlton received her bachelor’s degree in chemistry and physics. She headed for the University of Chicago, where she earned her master’s at 19, and her Ph.D. at 22. By the time Charlton had her first child, in her late 20s, she was a te
The Atlantic
7 min read

The Psychological Approach to Educating Kids

On a recent Monday morning, 25 freshmen filed into Rudolph “Keeth” Matheny’s wood-paneled portable classroom on the campus of Austin High School in Austin, Texas. But not before the shake. Matheny greeted each student by name, then extended his hand. “I won the handshake competition, and there’s an art to it,” one student said. “You have to do webbing to webbing, that’s the trick.” Shake firmly, but not too hard, look the person in the eye, smile. The student demonstrated and, indeed, his handshake was a winner. In addition to perfecting handshakes, Matheny, an ex-college football coach, teach
NPR
7 min read
Science

Educators On A Hot Topic: Global Warming 101

Organizers of Saturday's nationwide March for Science have some pretty lofty goals: supporting science "as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity." Promoting "evidence-based policies in the public interest." Oh, and don't forget highlighting "the very real role that science plays in each of our lives and the need to respect and encourage research that gives us insight into the world." Whoa, that's a lot of exalted ground to cover with one cardboard sign! But long after those signs and slogans are put away, educators will continue the fun, hard slog of helping students understand key issues,