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With more than 250,000 books sold, Roberta Gellis sets the standard for sweeping storytelling full of passion and pageantry.
Praise for Roberta Gellis:
"Exciting, romantic, and utterly satisfying."
-Mary Jo Putney

"Enjoy the work's rich tapestry of detail, well-drawn characters, suspenseful story line, deft meshing of factual and fictional incidents and fresh approach."
-Publishers Weekly

"Roberta Gellis is a superb storyteller of extraordinary talent."
-John Jakes, #1 bestselling author of The Gods of Newport

A maiden who will not marry


For the lovely Lady Audris, taking a husband would mean losing her home. She is content to concentrate on her special gift, weaving gorgeous tapestries that often contain hints of the future. But nothing predicts the arrival of Hugh Licorne, confident in his strength and single-minded in his determination-to have her.

A battle-hardened knight who needs a bride

From the moment Hugh sets eyes on Lady Audris, he knows he has found the woman destined to be his wife. She's courageous and beautiful, delicate yet strong. But winning her trust and defending her from her enemies will be the greatest battle he has ever faced.

Topics: Knights

Published: Sourcebooks on
ISBN: 9781402254994
List price: $6.99
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Nice. Hugh and Audris are interesting people (though there seem to be a vast number of bastards, in various conditions, in the story); Jernaeve itself is fascinating. The setting is the beginning of Stephen's reign, but unlike most of Gellis's historical romances (at least the ones I've read), the characters aren't moving on the highest stages. Hugh meets Stephen a few times, that's all. He's not a powerful lord (though more powerful by the end of the book than the beginning), nor spends his time in court, nor deals with high nobles besides his foster-father and his knight. Which makes the story more interesting, to me - when a fictional character makes choices that drive historical turning points, it bothers me; I want to know what really happened. Here that doesn't apply - Hugh plays a role in several important battles and negotiations, but he's never the driving force. So the whole thing feels more real. Audris' gift - if it is a gift - is weird and interesting, but again doesn't make major differences outside her immediate family (counting Hugh as family, too). I like that the obstacles are mostly external, too - aside from a short period of "I am not worthy" from Hugh, they're firmly planning to be together; Hugh just needs to work out how to get enough rank to be acceptable to Audris' guardian. And he never once thinks of the king's boon - even when the unicorn shield gets broken, he doesn't think to repair or replace it. That's a logic hole, I guess. But overall - good story, glad I read it and I will likely reread. And now I want more Jernaeve.more
This cover does not do this book justice as this is not a "bodice ripper." In fact had I seen this book in a book store I would have walked on by and that is a shame as I would have denied myself a very good book.Our heroine, Lady Audris weaves tapestries of outstanding beauty. But her tapestries have, at times, foretold the future. Whether this is because Audris is psychic or just very aware of what is going on around her you will have to read the book to find out.She is living in a highly defensible keep known as Iron Fist which is being held for her by her Uncle until she marries. She is the rightful heir but she fears if she marries a man strong enough to manage the place he will displace the Uncle she loves so much. Therefore Audris has vowed not to marry at all. But then Hugh Licorne comes into her life as part of King Stephen's entourage and all bets are off as they say. But Hugh is landless and not even a knight so how can he possibly even be considered as a suitable husband for the Lady Audris?There is much Hugh does not know about his parentage as he was raised as a foundling by the mighty Archbishop Thurston and then passed to Earl Walter for training. As Hugh works hard to gain some land for himself so he can be deemed worthy for Audris he learns of his past and finds out the secret of his birth.This was a truly enjoyable book with a strong love story and well developed characters. There is a strong bit of history too with the battle for control of Britain between Stephen and Matilda. The Scottish invasions play a vital role in the tale as well - there is a bit of gore but there cannot be war without it. Despite the cover the book is more historical novel than anything else. The sex scenes are there but don't dominate the book. I would love to follow these two on further adventures.more

Reviews

Nice. Hugh and Audris are interesting people (though there seem to be a vast number of bastards, in various conditions, in the story); Jernaeve itself is fascinating. The setting is the beginning of Stephen's reign, but unlike most of Gellis's historical romances (at least the ones I've read), the characters aren't moving on the highest stages. Hugh meets Stephen a few times, that's all. He's not a powerful lord (though more powerful by the end of the book than the beginning), nor spends his time in court, nor deals with high nobles besides his foster-father and his knight. Which makes the story more interesting, to me - when a fictional character makes choices that drive historical turning points, it bothers me; I want to know what really happened. Here that doesn't apply - Hugh plays a role in several important battles and negotiations, but he's never the driving force. So the whole thing feels more real. Audris' gift - if it is a gift - is weird and interesting, but again doesn't make major differences outside her immediate family (counting Hugh as family, too). I like that the obstacles are mostly external, too - aside from a short period of "I am not worthy" from Hugh, they're firmly planning to be together; Hugh just needs to work out how to get enough rank to be acceptable to Audris' guardian. And he never once thinks of the king's boon - even when the unicorn shield gets broken, he doesn't think to repair or replace it. That's a logic hole, I guess. But overall - good story, glad I read it and I will likely reread. And now I want more Jernaeve.more
This cover does not do this book justice as this is not a "bodice ripper." In fact had I seen this book in a book store I would have walked on by and that is a shame as I would have denied myself a very good book.Our heroine, Lady Audris weaves tapestries of outstanding beauty. But her tapestries have, at times, foretold the future. Whether this is because Audris is psychic or just very aware of what is going on around her you will have to read the book to find out.She is living in a highly defensible keep known as Iron Fist which is being held for her by her Uncle until she marries. She is the rightful heir but she fears if she marries a man strong enough to manage the place he will displace the Uncle she loves so much. Therefore Audris has vowed not to marry at all. But then Hugh Licorne comes into her life as part of King Stephen's entourage and all bets are off as they say. But Hugh is landless and not even a knight so how can he possibly even be considered as a suitable husband for the Lady Audris?There is much Hugh does not know about his parentage as he was raised as a foundling by the mighty Archbishop Thurston and then passed to Earl Walter for training. As Hugh works hard to gain some land for himself so he can be deemed worthy for Audris he learns of his past and finds out the secret of his birth.This was a truly enjoyable book with a strong love story and well developed characters. There is a strong bit of history too with the battle for control of Britain between Stephen and Matilda. The Scottish invasions play a vital role in the tale as well - there is a bit of gore but there cannot be war without it. Despite the cover the book is more historical novel than anything else. The sex scenes are there but don't dominate the book. I would love to follow these two on further adventures.more
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