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Sourcebooks Landmark, the leading publisher of Jane Austen-related fiction, is excited to announce a major release: Mr. Darcy, Vampyre by international bestselling author Amanda Grange.

Amanda Grange, bestselling author of Mr. Darcy's Diary, gives us something completely newa delightfully thrilling, paranormal Pride and Prejudice sequel, full of danger, darkness and deep romantic love…

Amanda Grange's style and wit bring readers back to Jane Austen's timeless storytelling, but always from a very unique and unusual perspective, and now Grange is back with an exciting and completely new take on Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet.

Mr. Darcy, Vampyre starts where Pride and Prejudice ends and introduces a dark family curse so perfectly that the result is a delightfully thrilling, spine-chilling, breathtaking read. A dark, poignant and visionary continuation of Austen's beloved story, this tale is full of danger, darkness and immortal love.

Published: Sourcebooks on
ISBN: 9781402240560
List price: $14.99
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I found this book a little boring. I thought there would be some sensual scenes with Darcy and Elizabeth, but it was just kisses, and the story seemed to drag on until the very end. Not a very good read. more
Well, I decided that since this was a gift from a friend, I'd better read it. She gave it to me after we had a spirited discussion about P&P&Z and S&S&S. She thought this held up the vampire end of things. It does, in a light sort of way, if you're willing to stretch both vampire lore and Austen legend. Unfortunately, I am not willing to do either, and was a bit impatient in my reading. It took a while to cut to the chase and figure out when the dirty was done to dear Darcy. Still, it wasn't Twilight (huge sigh of relief) and filled day of reading between more serious stuff. I do, on the whole, prefer both my Austen and my vampires, straight up. This was more of one of those fizzy drinks, with an umbrella, which definitely have their place, but are a little to sweet for my tastes.more
Further adventures of Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet after marrigae has them crossing europe on their honeymoon. Elizabeth is falling more and more in love but the enigmatic Mr Darcy is becoming even more standoffish. Well written and fun. Nice way to spend an afternoon in the sun.more
Taking off from the wedding day, Elizabeth and Darcy seem congenial and happy, but something is obviously eating up Darcy. From Elizabeth's perspective we learn of her confusion at not having a husband to share her honeymoon night with, nor someone to have a chat with first thing in the morning. Because she had no frame of reference for what a real couple did once they married, and only supposed, she could only rely on the fact that she felt sad and distant from the man she so desperately loved. This interesting conflict changes later on in the book as Elizabeth begins to put two and two together about her husband's strange behavior. They travel across the continent (Europe) and into Italy, where Elizabeth later learns more about her husband's secret. I suppose you could say that Darcy's secret is the great "test" of their love, and not that early pride and prejudice issue they had pre-marriage.On the whole, I thought the novel was entertaining and interesting. There were times the story ran long and I wanted to jump across the continent in their travels to the resolution, as I became more frustrated by Darcy's avoidance of his young wife than maybe even Elizabeth! The language is reflective of that restrained speech of Austen's novels, but delivered a bit more to modern tastes. Although they have tension around the whole "celibacy" issue, there is nothing graphic about this tale. You do get that Elizabeth is a little flustered by her lack of "romantic" time with her husband, which is a kind of funny. For that time period, would a woman get that flustered and wonder about seducing her new husband? I suppose so, but it felt strange with Austen's Elizabeth.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a quick read, with an interesting twist on the vampire theme. I can't say it's my favorite variation on a classic, although I'll also admit to not being as into the paranormal takes, but I will say that I thought it was interesting and entertaining. Amanda Grange has a subtle hand with the pen, and you can see it played out in this vampire take on a much beloved Pride and Prejudice.more
An amusing addition to the Austen canon! Amanda Grange has picked up the story where Austen let off - here, on the day that Lizzie weds Mr Darcy, the dear reader learns that not only is Darcy a vampyre, but also, if he consummates his marriage, poor Lizzie is destined to join him as a bloodsucker!! So as they honeymoon in Europe, poor Lizzie wonders why Darcy keeps is distance....If you enjoy a parody and are looking for a light romance, then this novel will suit you perfectly. But trying to imagine Colin Firth as a vampire???more
A bodice ripping romp with fangs. A fun read for when you just want to relax and let the story wash over you. Offers an interesting take on Dacy's cold personality.more
I'm not finished with the book yet but I had to get these thoughts down...I thought I was getting into a vampire story with a few characters from P&P. I'm on page 144 (halfway through basically) and I haven't heard any mention of Darcy being a vampire other than the frickin' book's title! Grange's writing style is showing its juvenileness. She goes into too much detail with things that don't matter, and hasn't gotten to the point of the book! I've also read her "Edmund Burtram's Diary" whose style I excused because it's in first person, like a diary should be, but now I'm realizing it's just not that good.I do have to give props to the cover designer for a very attractive cover. That's the only positive comment I can muster.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was a delightful book that could have used a little more blood - or at least love bites. Although told in third-person, the novel focuses more on Lizzy's thoughts and reactions to Mr. Darcy's strange behaviors. I wish that had not been the case! It would have been interesting to see a little into Mr. Darcy's head - or at least, know his whereabouts even if Lizzy did not.Amanda Grange presented vampyres in a unique manner, that is, one that I had not encountered (not that I have read many vampire novels). She re-invented what a vampire can and cannot do, yet still managed to preserve certain well-known aspects in some way. Mr. Darcy was an atypical vampire, in my mind, but it works for this story. The ending is a complete surprise, though quite a happy one!Tonight I also read a blurb The history behind Mr. Darcy, and I thought that gave the novel a whole new perspective! It is pretty neat to find out how Amanda Grange became inspired by Polidori and Mary Shelley while writing Mr. Darcy, Vampyre! After reading this, I can see some similarities between the writing styles of Frankenstein and Mr. Darcy, Vampyre - or at least, how the story slowly unfolds and builds up to the terrifying climax. I have not read Dracula yet, so I cannot say if this also bears a resemblance to that.I would say that Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was not as disturbingly scary as Bad Girls Don't Die. I am not entirely sure why, but I don't find vampires or zombies as frightening as ghostly possessions! I know, weird, but it's the truth! If you enjoyed Frankenstein or a nice vampire story with a Jane Austen twist, then sink your teeth into Mr. Darcy, Vampyre and enjoy its rich detail to traditional vampire lore!more
I couldn't resist this one. It starts a little slow (Darcy doesn't reveal himself as a vampyre until almost the very end) and it's a little light on vampyre-slaying action. However, Grange is actually a decent writer so there is that. Would only interest somebody who loves Austen AND vampire fiction.more
I acutally really liked it because I'm a sucker for all things Jane Austen and specifically all things Darcy. It wasn't really a thinking book but it was entertaining.more
This definitely wasn’t the book for me. I’ve never been one who reads classics well but I’ve wanted to expand my reading in that area and thought that this book would provide me a happy medium — a classic with a twist. While it did provide the latter it was still just too much for me. I’ve always liked a good combination of show and tell with perhaps a bit more on the telling side and this book was a lot more of the show.The plot was interesting enough and honestly it’s what kept me from completely abandoning the book when I was struggling to keep going. The history of how Darcy became a Vampyre was compelling and plausible given the supernatural circumstances. The other item in the pro column was the setting. Dark and mysterious there was a certain degree of gloom over the entirety of the story. To me, this added to the creepy vibe that one would anticipate accompanies the focus on the vampirism. Lastly, I’ll add that the location and time period also went a long way in setting a tone that was befitting a plot of this nature.I will say the end, which I will not spoil here, seemed awfully qick and not as satisfying as I would have liked. As a reader I went through all of this trial and tribulation for an extended period of time just to have it answered in a matter of pages. It just seemed a bit off in timing for me personally.Kudos to the author for infusing the elements of Austen’s characterizations into this story. Both Mr. and Mrs. Darcy remained true to their original forms.While I personally didn’t enjoy this book I don’t think it was a result of it being poorly written or plotted. Perhaps it’s more an issue ofmaking a poor selection on my part. If you like vampire books and are a fan of Austen’s work then definitely give this one a try.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre picks up where Pride and Prejudice leaves off, with Elizabeth and Darcy at the alter.What transpires next is an interesting concept, one which blends a touch of the original writings of Jane Austen and a new and modern twist of Darcy as a vampire.The book was slow and I was almost convinced that Elizabeth would only learn the truth in the very last pages, although the author had included enough clues for Elizabeth to surmise that something was disturbingly wrong with her new husband and the never ending stream of friends and relatives she is introduced to.Despite the slow pace and the incredibly quick ending, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was worth the read and if you are a Jane Austen fan who can take the mental leap into a realm far different than what you are used to, you probably will enjoy the book.more
I really enjoyed this book once they arrived at the Counts, it was a little slow before then. The book managed to grasp the personalities of Elizabeth and Darcy without changing them to much to fit into the Vampyre lore. It was wonderful how Ms. Grange managed to weave in characters that you love with a whole new story. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys alternate takes, continuations, or rewrites you will enjoy this book!more
I found it really easy to get into this novel, probably because it was really easy to separate it from the real P&P. There were the odd references to events and dialog in P&P, but for the most part I felt like I was reading a different novel with characters that happened to have the same name. It was a fun read, but I wish more of the book had been about the search for a cure - seemed kinda weak that Mr Darcy knew exactly where to find the mysterious temple...more
When I got this review request I actually squealed. Being a fan of both vampires and Pride and Prejudice, I couldn't wait to read this one.This new story continues where Pride and Prejudice ended. Elizabeth & Darcy are off on their honeymoon. What Elizabeth thinks to be a trip to the Lake District turns into a trip across Europe. She senses right away that something isn't right, but she can't quite figure out what is wrong...I felt that the beginning was a bit slow, but it soon picks up. Amanda Grange has done a wonderful job creating a new adventure for the much loved characters. Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a dark, captivating read. I think Austen fans and new readers alike will gobble this one up.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre brings us back to that final moment in Pride & Prejudice - it picks up right before Lizzie and Mr. Darcy’s wedding and takes us along with them on their wedding tour. To her surprise they will not be touring the Lake District but instead will be traveling through Europe. Shortly after their nuptials, Lizzie starts seeing some changes in Mr. Darcy’s demeanor - could it possibly be that he is becoming even more aloof then he was when they first met? Her worrying increases when he will not visit the marriage bed - but she still tries to make the best of their trip and makes herself as pleasant as possible while introduced to some of his "old" friends, family and acquaintances.Ms. Grange does a wonderful job in building tension throughout her novel. Yet through it all she makes it believable enough to where there are no discrepancies between Pride and Prejudice and her sequel. She does a fine job in weaving Mr. Darcy’s "vampiric" attributes with what we already knew about him. As the Darcys travel through Paris, to the Swiss Alps, Venice, and Italy - we are taken from splendid balls, to meeting a mysterious Count who strangely resides in a mirror-less castle, the threat of a mob lynching, to beautiful masquerade balls and eventually to being the guests of a Prince - whose actions might not be so princely. You fear for the innocent Lizzy and hope that their love can overcome Mr. Darcy’s deep, dark secret. Yet Ms. Grange does justice to the Lizzy we know and love - she continues to be the strong, opinionated young woman that stole our hearts.I loved that the story was riddled with garlic, cross’s, mirrors - or a lack thereof, remote bats and plenty of superstitious townfolk who cross themselves when the Darcys and their acquaintances pass by. All these minor details were interspersed throughout the story and couldn’t help bringing a smile to my face.Full of plenty of mystery, intrigue and adventure not to mention the scrumptious Mr. Darcy - a vampire! This is Austen fan-fiction at its best and required reading for any lover of Pride and Prejudice.more
This is a book that tells the story of what happens between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy after "Pride and Prejudice" ends. It was an okay book. I was a bit disappointed in the simple dialogue and the lagging plot.Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy get married and are embarking on their wedding tour. Elizabeth is surprised by Mr. Darcy's quickly changing moods. Then he tells her that they are not going on a tour of the Lakes but instead to Paris. As Elizabeth grows increasingly depressed over Mr. Darcy's lack of attention and fickle nature; she wonders if maybe they should have married at all. What she doesn't know is that there may be more to Mr. Darcy's moods than she could have ever imagined.First let's talk about what was good in this book. Grange did a wonderful job of seamlessly tying this story in with "Pride and Prejudice". Grange recalls scenes from the original book that support her evidence for Mr. Darcy's strange behavior. She does this very well. She makes Mr. Darcy being a vampire seem like a credible thing. Grange also does an excellent job of integrating vampires into normal European society in a very believable way.Unfortunately there was a lot about this book that I didn't like. The fact that it is called "Mr. Darcy, Vampyre" takes much of the tension in the plot away from the reader. Elizabeth spends the majority of the book figuring out that Mr. Darcy is a vampire. The reader knows this from the beginning, so it takes a lot of the mystery away from the story. Additionally I found that Elizabeth had been dumbed down as a character. Much of the sharpness and wit she showed in "Pride and Prejudice" is mellowed; for much of the book I was frustrated by how she blindly followed Mr. Darcy's lead. It took her forever to question him about his actions; the original Elizabeth as portrayed by Austen would never have taken that long.I also found the dialogue in general to be disappointing. At points the dialogue was very witty; but much of the time it sounded more awkward and forced than free-flowing and snappy. There were a number of times, especially early in the story, where I thought the dialogue was very immature and couldn't imagine any of the original characters speaking that way. "Pride and Prejudice" was all about the witty banter; and this book missed that mark for me.Lastly the pacing was a bit off. The beginning of the book starts to drag on as Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy go from one location to another; then suddenly there is a ton of action packed into the last chapter. I wish that the action had been spread out more; it would have been nice to see more of how Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth dealt with him being a vampire and it would have been nice to have the end quest take up some more page space.In summary, the book was an okay read. It is a nice fluffy diversion if you are really into vampires and "Pride and Prejudice". Personally though, if you are in interested into taking "Pride and Prejudice" into a paranormal realm I would read "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" instead; this zombie version retains much of the original story's wit and adds to it a little. I probably won't be checking out any other of Grange's books; I just wasn't that impressed with her writing style.more
Derbyshire to Dover in less than half a day by horse-drawn carriage! Not to mention Paris to the Alps in three days travel. Has the writer no concept of the distances involved? I know it's fiction (and fantasy to boot) and reading lengthy passages about several days worth of carriage journeys and stop-overs at inns would be tedious - especially since there doesn't seem to be any dialog between Lizzie and her Mr Darcy - but I can't manage to suspend my disbelief for the rest of the plot when details like this just scream out.In fact without some exchange of wit between Lizzie and Mr Darcy one begins to wonder what the whole point of the book is. Misses most of the charm of the original.more
The story begins on Elizabeth and Darcy's wedding day. The Bennett house is in full celebration with the marriage of both Elizabeth and Jane on the same day. Elizabeth believes this to be the happiest day of her life and cannot wait to become Darcy's wife.After a short ceremony and celebration, they leave for the Lake Region on their honeymoon tour but as soon as the carriage leaves, Darcy announces they area going to Europe instead. He makes a few arrangements, and before Elizabeth can utter a word or question, she finds herself in Dover awaiting a boat to France. In France, Darcy introduces Elizabeth to family and friends --- some she finds friendly, others she finds off-putting for a reason she cannot understand. She is overwhelmed but is happy to just be with Darcy. Shortly after arriving in France, he announces they will be going to visit his uncle who lives in the Alps. The journey to his uncle's is difficult and she finds herself scared frequently by wolves and stories from the locals. Darcy reassures her that all will be fine and once again she finds herself calmed by his words.At Darcy's uncle's castle, she is introduced to many new family members and acquaintances. Elizabeth is unsettled by comments and customs but does her best to make an outward show of happiness for Darcy. Their stay is cut short by a revolt from the villagers but Darcy and Elizabeth are able to escape without harm and find shelter in an old hunting lodge of Darcy's. He decides they will head to Venice, Italy for safety's sake and they are off again. Upon their arrival, Elizabeth is transfixed by the city and its inhabitants. It is also were she begins to question some of the strange things going on with Darcy and their relationship.After a near abduction and narrow escape from which Darcy rescues her, she asks many questions and finds she doesn't like any of the answers. Fortunately, a friend of Darcy's may have the cure they both seek.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is an interesting re-imagining of these characters. Grange is able to fully en robe herself in Darcy and his brooding thoughts making the character very believable. He is just as dark, daring, and confusing and in some ways even more intriguing because of his dangerous secret. The love between Elizabeth and Darcy is strong and you find yourself hoping she is still willing to accept him after his secret revealed.One small thing that did bother me --- Elizabeth does not pickup on any of the clues. Reflections that don't appear, no mirrors, wolves, Darcy mysteriously missing always at sunset and sunrise, an inordinate amount of bats. I always thought of Elizabeth as witty and smart and was a bit disappointed she didn't question Darcy earlier, but then again, she is a new bride wanting to be with her new husband and willing to forgo a few mishaps after what they had already been through. I guess in the end I am willing to forgive that.more
Surprisingly decent! I admit I was rather skeptical of the content, especially with the rash of "Twilight" fans taking pen to paper as of late, but Grange largely avoids those particular pitfalls. Taking an older view of vampires, Grange manages to blend the events in Austen's Pride and Prejudice without having to explain away Darcy's appearance in sunlight, his ability to be married in a church, his partaking of food and beverages, and a few other similar issues. And rest assured, he does not sparkle! Though to be honest, he's not particularly vampiric, either, save a lust for Elizabeth's blood that could be easily mistaken for a lust of a more basic sort.There's little explanation of why Elizabeth views Darcy's condition as a curse, especially given how mildly it impacts his life. A vampire's only true hardship seems to be eternal life - watching those they love grow old and die while they themselves stay youthful - but give how many other vampires seem around and about, it appears as though only a peer-group change would be needed to rectify the situation. And Elizabeth herself never considers turning, even to dismiss it, which seems like a rather large gap in logic. Like other aspects of the novel, it could have been thought though a little more by the author, since it certainly occurs to the reader. Who wouldn't want to live a life of eternal youth and endless riches?To which I must also add, Darcy's wealth as portrayed may rival the Queen's. I assume this is meant to be a result of his long life, but given he's lived less than 200 years, it nevertheless seems extreme. The ending is the weakest plot point of the novel, descending a bit into an Indiana Jones-like adventure in the last thirty or so pages. It also cuts against vampire lore by, pardon the spoiler, allowing Darcy to regain his humanity. With all these negatives, Grange's novel is still superior to the vast majority of the other Pride and Prejudice continuations, vampires or no. The characters keep the bulk of their integrity intact, with only minor slips into emotionalism, and the writing is solid. I would recommend this novel exclusively to those who enjoy Pride and Prejudice adaptations and continuations.more
When I saw this in the store I had to pick it up. I saw it and giggled. Austen and Vampires how could I not enjoy it? I did like the book. The tension was quite good. The ending was a little flat though. There were a lot of questions unanswered, or rather the answers were incomplete. I still liked the book for its kitch. If you like Austen and vampires it is worth the read, otherwise you can skip it.more
When I first saw this book on the shelf at our local Target, my initial reaction was to laugh. After the success of "Twilight" and "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies," I guess it was only a matter of time before Mr. Darcy grew fangs, but it didn't occur to me until then. Anyways, it looked amusing enough, so I picked it up at the library.Let me begin by saying I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed most of the novel. The characters of Darcy and Elizabeth, while not always spot on (I think Darcy exclaims a bit too much by the end), do feel right overall. The handling of the vampire myth also works, and I like how the author has made it her own. The plot also moves forward fast enough to pull you in - at least, it did with me. Now, that being said, I was completely disappointed by the last few chapters. It was like the author suddenly got bored with the story, or ran out of time. Throughout the book, she is building the mystery of what it wrong with Darcy. Then, and I don't think I'm giving anything away, there's the problem of their marriage and friends in relation to his curse. All of a sudden, the story is wrapped up in a neat, little package, and everyone lives happily ever after. Issues with other characters are either solved in a unrealistic way, or left hanging. And the final solution to the main problem is just plain cheesy. You're left at the end of the book going, "what?" Overall, I enjoyed it. Would I recommend it? For some fun, light-hearted reading, definitely - especially if you love Elizabeth and Darcy. Just don't expect much from the ending.more
This book is about Lizzy and Darcy, from Jane Austin's Pride And Prejudice. The twist is that Darcy is actually a vampyre and unable to touch Lizzy out of fear that he might turn her. Lizzy accounts his strange behavior as simply evidence that he does not love her; but, acknowledges that his actions (looks, caresses, conversations, etc..) constitute love. She is confused about thier relationship through out her wedding tour around Europe. Darcy seeks immidiate advice on how to handle his bride, only to be the target of an Anciant One who seeks to make Elizabeth his. Among the people Darcy and Lizzy meet are enemies out to destroy them! Lizzy now has a decision to make: should she stay with the vampyre she loves or move back to her home as a divorcee? The end came to quickly, I wished there could have been more about thier struggles when Lizzy found out about Darcy's secret. Overall, the story was very slow paced, I wish there was more action and more fangs.more
Darcy and Elizabeth are on their wedding tour. They explore Europe like no other; going to Paris, the Alps, Venice and everywhere in between. After their marriage, Elizabeth expects Darcy to be the attentive and affectionate husband she has always imagined but he does not live up to her expectations. He becomes more aloof and secretive than he was in Pride and Prejudice and she can not figure out why he is holding back his affections. Mrs. Grange has an amazing ability to describe a scene so completely it is as if you are sitting there with the character.Imagine you are walking through a crowded shopping mall. As you walk you catch brief scents of things like the newest perfume, cinnamon buns, coffee, rubber soled shoes and human sweat. With each scent is attached a memory. The cinnamon buns remind you of the time your best friend was pregnant and everything she ate had to come from Cinnabon. The coffee reminds you of sitting at your favorite book store when you read that book, remember the one I'm talking about. The rubber soled shoes remind you of school clothes shopping with your mother, what a nightmare that was. . . Each memory is as brief as the scent is, they do not linger. That was the sensation I had when reading Mr. Darcy, Vampyre. I would catch a phrase, paragraph or sentence that would briefly, but not quite remind me of other books and movies I had once enjoyed. A bit of Dracula here, but not really. Almost a piece of Radiers of the Lost Ark, but no. . . Was that Twilight I saw, couldn't be. . . It was amazing how Grange was able to do this all the while making the vampire story her own.I worried before reading this book that the vampyre story had been over done and there was nothing new a writer could bring to the table. I admit, I was wrong. Grange is able to make her vamprye utterly new and different. My favorite part of any vamprye story is their history, what have they done with all this time they have had to live? Grange is able to make her vamprye's history compelling, heart breaking and triumphant all at once.more
In this fan follow up to Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre beings with the marriage of Elizabeth and Darcy. The happy occasion is only momentarily sullied by Darcy’s silence and reserve, as well as a moment where Elizabeth reads a particular expression of distress on his face. The two of them embark together on their wedding tour throughout Europe, and the good spirit in Elizabeth’s heart is slowly cast into shadow the more aloof Darcy becomes. Rather, though he is affectionate, there seems a wall that Elizabeth cannot penetrate and she begins to question his love for her. Despite being married, Darcy is refraining from physical affections and Elizabeth wonders if she is the cause, and if Darcy regrets their union since many in his family are not too pleased with their marriage.Strange things begin to happen as the newlyweds travel and visit various cities on their tour. Bats are found flying around the windows, ethereal and beautiful friends of Darcy recall memories of times long past, reflections in mirrors are not cast, and there seems a strange pull to Darcy that is hypnotic and unnatural. While in the castle of a distant uncle of Darcy’s, a Count, an omen is cast that says Elizabeth will cause the death of Darcy. Also, they are driven from the castle by an attack of villagers brandishing weapons and torches, very Frankenstein. During the attack, Elizabeth glimpses something strange about Darcy that she readily brushes off. But the strangeness does not end there. In the palazzo of a Prince, Elizabeth find a book full of illustrations that leave her with a sense of déjà vu and a vision of a fire that she couldn’t possibly remember. During this visit, she again glimpses something in Darcy that causes her to faint and promptly forget. About this time, tired of Darcy’s lack of affection, Elizabeth decides to leave for home. Everything that has happened is all very strange and upsetting to Elizabeth who soon learns that she is the target of something more sinister than her ill-feelings could have predicted.In some ways, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is reminiscent of those stunning and dark gothic fiction novels in the style of Shelley and Poe. There are a lot of shadowy undertones and a subtle, sublime feeling of dread that is sliced up by lighter, more romantic moments. In this way, you are taken on the same rollercoaster of light and dark as Elizabeth, feeling the darkness as keenly as she does, and delighting in the happier moments. Grange is very good with how she writes scenes and descriptions so that they flow beautifully and can be easily imagined with vivid detail.Yet I was ultimately disappointed by the book. The bulk of the book was spent on travels and meeting and talking to new people, and as such it was very slow and with minimal excitement. The true nature of Darcy wasn’t even revealed until the nearly the end of the book, and his vampire self was only hinted to slightly. There was very little vampyre in Mr. Darcy, Vamypre. I had expected a lot more out of the book and had thought Elizabeth would interact more with Darcy as a vampire instead of hearing his secret and promptly having a miraculous way arise to rid him of his ‘curse.’ I was even more let down by the very convenient and easy way by which Darcy was cured of his vampiric affliction. It was just so… sentimental and silly. I had at least hoped that the ending would be climactic and thrilling since it drug on so long to the big reveal only to be disappointed. Fortunately for Austen fans, the book is quite good in its characterizations of both Elizabeth and Darcy. In short: was it a good book? Yes, it was. I enjoyed reading it very much, I just think it to be a bit overrated as far as vampire books go and the ending was very quick, too easy, and anti-climactic.more
Synopsis:Mr. Darcy, Vampyre continues the stories of Jane Austen's main characters from Pride and Prejudice from the night before the double wedding of Fitzwilliam Darcy to Elizabeth Bennett and of Charles Bingley to Jane Bennett.After the ceremony, Elizabeth and Darcy head to Europe for their honeymoon. As Darcy introduces Elizabeth to his friends and experiences in the continent, something feels wrong to Elizabeth. Unsure about the source of her misgivings, Elizabeth begins to wonder about the strength of their bond to each other. Through Elizabeth's letters to her sister Jane, we learn of Elizabeth's increasing anxiety. While there are hints that the problems between Darcy and Elizabeth are of an unusual nature, Amanda Grange's depiction of their characters remains similar to Austen's original.Review:This is Amanda Grange's latest entry into the creative interpretation of Pride and Prejudice and my first time to read a creative interpretation of this sort. To be honest, I wasn't sure how much of a purist I would turn out to be. I enjoyed reading Amanda Grange's characterization of Elizabeth and Darcy because she captured their personalities and interaction so well. For those willing to imagine Elizabeth and Darcy taking an odd turn into an alternative reality, this book is an enjoyable read. You have your beloved characters in a new setting. I highly recommend Mr. Darcy, Vampyre to those who enjoyed Pride and Prejudice and would be interested in exploring different directions that Elizabeth and Darcy might take, particularly those who enjoy vampire stories along the lines of Anne Rice. Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark (August 1, 2009), 320 pages.Courtesy of Sourcebooks Landmark.more
It would seem that the author had some great raw material; Austen's Darcy and vampires! How delicious! What an opportunity for creativity! Alas, I have been sorely disappointed. The prose itself is pedestrian and aimed at 6th graders. The story moves oh so slowly. Ms. Grange's vampires don't bite; instead they throw dances, buy property, and travel. Yawn. This story has no meat.more
If you do not know already, Pride and Prejudice is my all time favorite book and I have found it really hard to find any good related/sequel books. Since I love vampires and Pride & Prejudice I was really curious how this book would turn out. I’m glad to say I am pleasantly surprised by how well it was written.The story picks up right before the wedding between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth and Jane and Mr. Bingley. I felt Grange stayed true to Lizzie’s character even while she is dealing with all the strangeness that occurs after her wedding day. What I enjoyed was that this book was not all blood and gore with the secret revelation by Mr. Darcy coming early on and it being an action/horror book. The main focus was still the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth. The style of writing was fun and enjoyable (is that redundant?). I enjoyed the little bits like when Elizabeth eats spaghetti for the first time.If you are a fan of Pride and Prejudice then you should definitely check this one out. There are a lot of references to the original book but even so I think people who have not read Pride & Prejudice would still enjoy this book.more
"Her attention was attracted by movement close at hand and she saw the dark shape of a bird--no, a bat--heading towards the window. She closed it quickly, leaving the bat to hover outside. As she looked at it she was seized with a strange feeling. She thought how lonely it must feel, being shut out; being a part and yet not a part of the warmth and light within." (Page 67 of the ARC)Amanda Grange's Mr. Darcy, Vampyre, published by Sourcebooks, catches up with Mr. & Mrs. Darcy right before their nuptials and follows them along their wedding tour. As plans change and the Darcys spontaneously tour Europe, mingling with Mr. Darcy's friends, Elizabeth begins to feel that there is a deep dark secret her husband is hiding from her.Throughout the novel, Grange adheres to Jane Austen's characters and the time in which those characters live. Readers of Pride & Prejudice may have wondered why Fitzwilliam Darcy was so reserved, but Grange provides a paranormal alternative to mere position and wealth considerations in the 19th century. The lush landscape and dramatic plot will suck readers into Mr. Darcy, Vampyre as readers travel with Elizabeth and Darcy through Paris, Italy, and the Alps."She needed no urging. The sumptuous atmosphere was starting to oppress her and the strangely sinuous people were unsettling. She was relieved to get outside and breathe the fresh air.Night hung over the city like a dark mantle, pierced with the light of flambeaux and, up above, there seemed to be a thousand stars." (Page 47 of ARC)Elizabeth is captivated by her foreign surroundings, but eventually she begins to feel weary of her new acquaintances and the tension in her marriage. Readers will grow anxious and paranoid just as Elizabeth does. From bandits and wolves in the woods outside a secluded castle to the reappearance of Lady Catherine de Bourgh and her ties to Darcy's secret, Grange weaves a twisted narrative that leaves Elizabeth, Darcy, and readers on the edge of their seats.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a paranormal continuation of Austen's Pride & Prejudice that is executed successfully. Grange is a master of this time period and her imagination shines through in this novel. It took me less than 3 days to read this novel in the free time I had at home. Readers will be absorbed by this paranormal world.more
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Reviews

I found this book a little boring. I thought there would be some sensual scenes with Darcy and Elizabeth, but it was just kisses, and the story seemed to drag on until the very end. Not a very good read. more
Well, I decided that since this was a gift from a friend, I'd better read it. She gave it to me after we had a spirited discussion about P&P&Z and S&S&S. She thought this held up the vampire end of things. It does, in a light sort of way, if you're willing to stretch both vampire lore and Austen legend. Unfortunately, I am not willing to do either, and was a bit impatient in my reading. It took a while to cut to the chase and figure out when the dirty was done to dear Darcy. Still, it wasn't Twilight (huge sigh of relief) and filled day of reading between more serious stuff. I do, on the whole, prefer both my Austen and my vampires, straight up. This was more of one of those fizzy drinks, with an umbrella, which definitely have their place, but are a little to sweet for my tastes.more
Further adventures of Mr Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet after marrigae has them crossing europe on their honeymoon. Elizabeth is falling more and more in love but the enigmatic Mr Darcy is becoming even more standoffish. Well written and fun. Nice way to spend an afternoon in the sun.more
Taking off from the wedding day, Elizabeth and Darcy seem congenial and happy, but something is obviously eating up Darcy. From Elizabeth's perspective we learn of her confusion at not having a husband to share her honeymoon night with, nor someone to have a chat with first thing in the morning. Because she had no frame of reference for what a real couple did once they married, and only supposed, she could only rely on the fact that she felt sad and distant from the man she so desperately loved. This interesting conflict changes later on in the book as Elizabeth begins to put two and two together about her husband's strange behavior. They travel across the continent (Europe) and into Italy, where Elizabeth later learns more about her husband's secret. I suppose you could say that Darcy's secret is the great "test" of their love, and not that early pride and prejudice issue they had pre-marriage.On the whole, I thought the novel was entertaining and interesting. There were times the story ran long and I wanted to jump across the continent in their travels to the resolution, as I became more frustrated by Darcy's avoidance of his young wife than maybe even Elizabeth! The language is reflective of that restrained speech of Austen's novels, but delivered a bit more to modern tastes. Although they have tension around the whole "celibacy" issue, there is nothing graphic about this tale. You do get that Elizabeth is a little flustered by her lack of "romantic" time with her husband, which is a kind of funny. For that time period, would a woman get that flustered and wonder about seducing her new husband? I suppose so, but it felt strange with Austen's Elizabeth.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a quick read, with an interesting twist on the vampire theme. I can't say it's my favorite variation on a classic, although I'll also admit to not being as into the paranormal takes, but I will say that I thought it was interesting and entertaining. Amanda Grange has a subtle hand with the pen, and you can see it played out in this vampire take on a much beloved Pride and Prejudice.more
An amusing addition to the Austen canon! Amanda Grange has picked up the story where Austen let off - here, on the day that Lizzie weds Mr Darcy, the dear reader learns that not only is Darcy a vampyre, but also, if he consummates his marriage, poor Lizzie is destined to join him as a bloodsucker!! So as they honeymoon in Europe, poor Lizzie wonders why Darcy keeps is distance....If you enjoy a parody and are looking for a light romance, then this novel will suit you perfectly. But trying to imagine Colin Firth as a vampire???more
A bodice ripping romp with fangs. A fun read for when you just want to relax and let the story wash over you. Offers an interesting take on Dacy's cold personality.more
I'm not finished with the book yet but I had to get these thoughts down...I thought I was getting into a vampire story with a few characters from P&P. I'm on page 144 (halfway through basically) and I haven't heard any mention of Darcy being a vampire other than the frickin' book's title! Grange's writing style is showing its juvenileness. She goes into too much detail with things that don't matter, and hasn't gotten to the point of the book! I've also read her "Edmund Burtram's Diary" whose style I excused because it's in first person, like a diary should be, but now I'm realizing it's just not that good.I do have to give props to the cover designer for a very attractive cover. That's the only positive comment I can muster.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was a delightful book that could have used a little more blood - or at least love bites. Although told in third-person, the novel focuses more on Lizzy's thoughts and reactions to Mr. Darcy's strange behaviors. I wish that had not been the case! It would have been interesting to see a little into Mr. Darcy's head - or at least, know his whereabouts even if Lizzy did not.Amanda Grange presented vampyres in a unique manner, that is, one that I had not encountered (not that I have read many vampire novels). She re-invented what a vampire can and cannot do, yet still managed to preserve certain well-known aspects in some way. Mr. Darcy was an atypical vampire, in my mind, but it works for this story. The ending is a complete surprise, though quite a happy one!Tonight I also read a blurb The history behind Mr. Darcy, and I thought that gave the novel a whole new perspective! It is pretty neat to find out how Amanda Grange became inspired by Polidori and Mary Shelley while writing Mr. Darcy, Vampyre! After reading this, I can see some similarities between the writing styles of Frankenstein and Mr. Darcy, Vampyre - or at least, how the story slowly unfolds and builds up to the terrifying climax. I have not read Dracula yet, so I cannot say if this also bears a resemblance to that.I would say that Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was not as disturbingly scary as Bad Girls Don't Die. I am not entirely sure why, but I don't find vampires or zombies as frightening as ghostly possessions! I know, weird, but it's the truth! If you enjoyed Frankenstein or a nice vampire story with a Jane Austen twist, then sink your teeth into Mr. Darcy, Vampyre and enjoy its rich detail to traditional vampire lore!more
I couldn't resist this one. It starts a little slow (Darcy doesn't reveal himself as a vampyre until almost the very end) and it's a little light on vampyre-slaying action. However, Grange is actually a decent writer so there is that. Would only interest somebody who loves Austen AND vampire fiction.more
I acutally really liked it because I'm a sucker for all things Jane Austen and specifically all things Darcy. It wasn't really a thinking book but it was entertaining.more
This definitely wasn’t the book for me. I’ve never been one who reads classics well but I’ve wanted to expand my reading in that area and thought that this book would provide me a happy medium — a classic with a twist. While it did provide the latter it was still just too much for me. I’ve always liked a good combination of show and tell with perhaps a bit more on the telling side and this book was a lot more of the show.The plot was interesting enough and honestly it’s what kept me from completely abandoning the book when I was struggling to keep going. The history of how Darcy became a Vampyre was compelling and plausible given the supernatural circumstances. The other item in the pro column was the setting. Dark and mysterious there was a certain degree of gloom over the entirety of the story. To me, this added to the creepy vibe that one would anticipate accompanies the focus on the vampirism. Lastly, I’ll add that the location and time period also went a long way in setting a tone that was befitting a plot of this nature.I will say the end, which I will not spoil here, seemed awfully qick and not as satisfying as I would have liked. As a reader I went through all of this trial and tribulation for an extended period of time just to have it answered in a matter of pages. It just seemed a bit off in timing for me personally.Kudos to the author for infusing the elements of Austen’s characterizations into this story. Both Mr. and Mrs. Darcy remained true to their original forms.While I personally didn’t enjoy this book I don’t think it was a result of it being poorly written or plotted. Perhaps it’s more an issue ofmaking a poor selection on my part. If you like vampire books and are a fan of Austen’s work then definitely give this one a try.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre picks up where Pride and Prejudice leaves off, with Elizabeth and Darcy at the alter.What transpires next is an interesting concept, one which blends a touch of the original writings of Jane Austen and a new and modern twist of Darcy as a vampire.The book was slow and I was almost convinced that Elizabeth would only learn the truth in the very last pages, although the author had included enough clues for Elizabeth to surmise that something was disturbingly wrong with her new husband and the never ending stream of friends and relatives she is introduced to.Despite the slow pace and the incredibly quick ending, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre was worth the read and if you are a Jane Austen fan who can take the mental leap into a realm far different than what you are used to, you probably will enjoy the book.more
I really enjoyed this book once they arrived at the Counts, it was a little slow before then. The book managed to grasp the personalities of Elizabeth and Darcy without changing them to much to fit into the Vampyre lore. It was wonderful how Ms. Grange managed to weave in characters that you love with a whole new story. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys alternate takes, continuations, or rewrites you will enjoy this book!more
I found it really easy to get into this novel, probably because it was really easy to separate it from the real P&P. There were the odd references to events and dialog in P&P, but for the most part I felt like I was reading a different novel with characters that happened to have the same name. It was a fun read, but I wish more of the book had been about the search for a cure - seemed kinda weak that Mr Darcy knew exactly where to find the mysterious temple...more
When I got this review request I actually squealed. Being a fan of both vampires and Pride and Prejudice, I couldn't wait to read this one.This new story continues where Pride and Prejudice ended. Elizabeth & Darcy are off on their honeymoon. What Elizabeth thinks to be a trip to the Lake District turns into a trip across Europe. She senses right away that something isn't right, but she can't quite figure out what is wrong...I felt that the beginning was a bit slow, but it soon picks up. Amanda Grange has done a wonderful job creating a new adventure for the much loved characters. Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a dark, captivating read. I think Austen fans and new readers alike will gobble this one up.more
Mr. Darcy, Vampyre brings us back to that final moment in Pride & Prejudice - it picks up right before Lizzie and Mr. Darcy’s wedding and takes us along with them on their wedding tour. To her surprise they will not be touring the Lake District but instead will be traveling through Europe. Shortly after their nuptials, Lizzie starts seeing some changes in Mr. Darcy’s demeanor - could it possibly be that he is becoming even more aloof then he was when they first met? Her worrying increases when he will not visit the marriage bed - but she still tries to make the best of their trip and makes herself as pleasant as possible while introduced to some of his "old" friends, family and acquaintances.Ms. Grange does a wonderful job in building tension throughout her novel. Yet through it all she makes it believable enough to where there are no discrepancies between Pride and Prejudice and her sequel. She does a fine job in weaving Mr. Darcy’s "vampiric" attributes with what we already knew about him. As the Darcys travel through Paris, to the Swiss Alps, Venice, and Italy - we are taken from splendid balls, to meeting a mysterious Count who strangely resides in a mirror-less castle, the threat of a mob lynching, to beautiful masquerade balls and eventually to being the guests of a Prince - whose actions might not be so princely. You fear for the innocent Lizzy and hope that their love can overcome Mr. Darcy’s deep, dark secret. Yet Ms. Grange does justice to the Lizzy we know and love - she continues to be the strong, opinionated young woman that stole our hearts.I loved that the story was riddled with garlic, cross’s, mirrors - or a lack thereof, remote bats and plenty of superstitious townfolk who cross themselves when the Darcys and their acquaintances pass by. All these minor details were interspersed throughout the story and couldn’t help bringing a smile to my face.Full of plenty of mystery, intrigue and adventure not to mention the scrumptious Mr. Darcy - a vampire! This is Austen fan-fiction at its best and required reading for any lover of Pride and Prejudice.more
This is a book that tells the story of what happens between Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy after "Pride and Prejudice" ends. It was an okay book. I was a bit disappointed in the simple dialogue and the lagging plot.Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy get married and are embarking on their wedding tour. Elizabeth is surprised by Mr. Darcy's quickly changing moods. Then he tells her that they are not going on a tour of the Lakes but instead to Paris. As Elizabeth grows increasingly depressed over Mr. Darcy's lack of attention and fickle nature; she wonders if maybe they should have married at all. What she doesn't know is that there may be more to Mr. Darcy's moods than she could have ever imagined.First let's talk about what was good in this book. Grange did a wonderful job of seamlessly tying this story in with "Pride and Prejudice". Grange recalls scenes from the original book that support her evidence for Mr. Darcy's strange behavior. She does this very well. She makes Mr. Darcy being a vampire seem like a credible thing. Grange also does an excellent job of integrating vampires into normal European society in a very believable way.Unfortunately there was a lot about this book that I didn't like. The fact that it is called "Mr. Darcy, Vampyre" takes much of the tension in the plot away from the reader. Elizabeth spends the majority of the book figuring out that Mr. Darcy is a vampire. The reader knows this from the beginning, so it takes a lot of the mystery away from the story. Additionally I found that Elizabeth had been dumbed down as a character. Much of the sharpness and wit she showed in "Pride and Prejudice" is mellowed; for much of the book I was frustrated by how she blindly followed Mr. Darcy's lead. It took her forever to question him about his actions; the original Elizabeth as portrayed by Austen would never have taken that long.I also found the dialogue in general to be disappointing. At points the dialogue was very witty; but much of the time it sounded more awkward and forced than free-flowing and snappy. There were a number of times, especially early in the story, where I thought the dialogue was very immature and couldn't imagine any of the original characters speaking that way. "Pride and Prejudice" was all about the witty banter; and this book missed that mark for me.Lastly the pacing was a bit off. The beginning of the book starts to drag on as Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy go from one location to another; then suddenly there is a ton of action packed into the last chapter. I wish that the action had been spread out more; it would have been nice to see more of how Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth dealt with him being a vampire and it would have been nice to have the end quest take up some more page space.In summary, the book was an okay read. It is a nice fluffy diversion if you are really into vampires and "Pride and Prejudice". Personally though, if you are in interested into taking "Pride and Prejudice" into a paranormal realm I would read "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies" instead; this zombie version retains much of the original story's wit and adds to it a little. I probably won't be checking out any other of Grange's books; I just wasn't that impressed with her writing style.more
Derbyshire to Dover in less than half a day by horse-drawn carriage! Not to mention Paris to the Alps in three days travel. Has the writer no concept of the distances involved? I know it's fiction (and fantasy to boot) and reading lengthy passages about several days worth of carriage journeys and stop-overs at inns would be tedious - especially since there doesn't seem to be any dialog between Lizzie and her Mr Darcy - but I can't manage to suspend my disbelief for the rest of the plot when details like this just scream out.In fact without some exchange of wit between Lizzie and Mr Darcy one begins to wonder what the whole point of the book is. Misses most of the charm of the original.more
The story begins on Elizabeth and Darcy's wedding day. The Bennett house is in full celebration with the marriage of both Elizabeth and Jane on the same day. Elizabeth believes this to be the happiest day of her life and cannot wait to become Darcy's wife.After a short ceremony and celebration, they leave for the Lake Region on their honeymoon tour but as soon as the carriage leaves, Darcy announces they area going to Europe instead. He makes a few arrangements, and before Elizabeth can utter a word or question, she finds herself in Dover awaiting a boat to France. In France, Darcy introduces Elizabeth to family and friends --- some she finds friendly, others she finds off-putting for a reason she cannot understand. She is overwhelmed but is happy to just be with Darcy. Shortly after arriving in France, he announces they will be going to visit his uncle who lives in the Alps. The journey to his uncle's is difficult and she finds herself scared frequently by wolves and stories from the locals. Darcy reassures her that all will be fine and once again she finds herself calmed by his words.At Darcy's uncle's castle, she is introduced to many new family members and acquaintances. Elizabeth is unsettled by comments and customs but does her best to make an outward show of happiness for Darcy. Their stay is cut short by a revolt from the villagers but Darcy and Elizabeth are able to escape without harm and find shelter in an old hunting lodge of Darcy's. He decides they will head to Venice, Italy for safety's sake and they are off again. Upon their arrival, Elizabeth is transfixed by the city and its inhabitants. It is also were she begins to question some of the strange things going on with Darcy and their relationship.After a near abduction and narrow escape from which Darcy rescues her, she asks many questions and finds she doesn't like any of the answers. Fortunately, a friend of Darcy's may have the cure they both seek.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is an interesting re-imagining of these characters. Grange is able to fully en robe herself in Darcy and his brooding thoughts making the character very believable. He is just as dark, daring, and confusing and in some ways even more intriguing because of his dangerous secret. The love between Elizabeth and Darcy is strong and you find yourself hoping she is still willing to accept him after his secret revealed.One small thing that did bother me --- Elizabeth does not pickup on any of the clues. Reflections that don't appear, no mirrors, wolves, Darcy mysteriously missing always at sunset and sunrise, an inordinate amount of bats. I always thought of Elizabeth as witty and smart and was a bit disappointed she didn't question Darcy earlier, but then again, she is a new bride wanting to be with her new husband and willing to forgo a few mishaps after what they had already been through. I guess in the end I am willing to forgive that.more
Surprisingly decent! I admit I was rather skeptical of the content, especially with the rash of "Twilight" fans taking pen to paper as of late, but Grange largely avoids those particular pitfalls. Taking an older view of vampires, Grange manages to blend the events in Austen's Pride and Prejudice without having to explain away Darcy's appearance in sunlight, his ability to be married in a church, his partaking of food and beverages, and a few other similar issues. And rest assured, he does not sparkle! Though to be honest, he's not particularly vampiric, either, save a lust for Elizabeth's blood that could be easily mistaken for a lust of a more basic sort.There's little explanation of why Elizabeth views Darcy's condition as a curse, especially given how mildly it impacts his life. A vampire's only true hardship seems to be eternal life - watching those they love grow old and die while they themselves stay youthful - but give how many other vampires seem around and about, it appears as though only a peer-group change would be needed to rectify the situation. And Elizabeth herself never considers turning, even to dismiss it, which seems like a rather large gap in logic. Like other aspects of the novel, it could have been thought though a little more by the author, since it certainly occurs to the reader. Who wouldn't want to live a life of eternal youth and endless riches?To which I must also add, Darcy's wealth as portrayed may rival the Queen's. I assume this is meant to be a result of his long life, but given he's lived less than 200 years, it nevertheless seems extreme. The ending is the weakest plot point of the novel, descending a bit into an Indiana Jones-like adventure in the last thirty or so pages. It also cuts against vampire lore by, pardon the spoiler, allowing Darcy to regain his humanity. With all these negatives, Grange's novel is still superior to the vast majority of the other Pride and Prejudice continuations, vampires or no. The characters keep the bulk of their integrity intact, with only minor slips into emotionalism, and the writing is solid. I would recommend this novel exclusively to those who enjoy Pride and Prejudice adaptations and continuations.more
When I saw this in the store I had to pick it up. I saw it and giggled. Austen and Vampires how could I not enjoy it? I did like the book. The tension was quite good. The ending was a little flat though. There were a lot of questions unanswered, or rather the answers were incomplete. I still liked the book for its kitch. If you like Austen and vampires it is worth the read, otherwise you can skip it.more
When I first saw this book on the shelf at our local Target, my initial reaction was to laugh. After the success of "Twilight" and "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies," I guess it was only a matter of time before Mr. Darcy grew fangs, but it didn't occur to me until then. Anyways, it looked amusing enough, so I picked it up at the library.Let me begin by saying I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed most of the novel. The characters of Darcy and Elizabeth, while not always spot on (I think Darcy exclaims a bit too much by the end), do feel right overall. The handling of the vampire myth also works, and I like how the author has made it her own. The plot also moves forward fast enough to pull you in - at least, it did with me. Now, that being said, I was completely disappointed by the last few chapters. It was like the author suddenly got bored with the story, or ran out of time. Throughout the book, she is building the mystery of what it wrong with Darcy. Then, and I don't think I'm giving anything away, there's the problem of their marriage and friends in relation to his curse. All of a sudden, the story is wrapped up in a neat, little package, and everyone lives happily ever after. Issues with other characters are either solved in a unrealistic way, or left hanging. And the final solution to the main problem is just plain cheesy. You're left at the end of the book going, "what?" Overall, I enjoyed it. Would I recommend it? For some fun, light-hearted reading, definitely - especially if you love Elizabeth and Darcy. Just don't expect much from the ending.more
This book is about Lizzy and Darcy, from Jane Austin's Pride And Prejudice. The twist is that Darcy is actually a vampyre and unable to touch Lizzy out of fear that he might turn her. Lizzy accounts his strange behavior as simply evidence that he does not love her; but, acknowledges that his actions (looks, caresses, conversations, etc..) constitute love. She is confused about thier relationship through out her wedding tour around Europe. Darcy seeks immidiate advice on how to handle his bride, only to be the target of an Anciant One who seeks to make Elizabeth his. Among the people Darcy and Lizzy meet are enemies out to destroy them! Lizzy now has a decision to make: should she stay with the vampyre she loves or move back to her home as a divorcee? The end came to quickly, I wished there could have been more about thier struggles when Lizzy found out about Darcy's secret. Overall, the story was very slow paced, I wish there was more action and more fangs.more
Darcy and Elizabeth are on their wedding tour. They explore Europe like no other; going to Paris, the Alps, Venice and everywhere in between. After their marriage, Elizabeth expects Darcy to be the attentive and affectionate husband she has always imagined but he does not live up to her expectations. He becomes more aloof and secretive than he was in Pride and Prejudice and she can not figure out why he is holding back his affections. Mrs. Grange has an amazing ability to describe a scene so completely it is as if you are sitting there with the character.Imagine you are walking through a crowded shopping mall. As you walk you catch brief scents of things like the newest perfume, cinnamon buns, coffee, rubber soled shoes and human sweat. With each scent is attached a memory. The cinnamon buns remind you of the time your best friend was pregnant and everything she ate had to come from Cinnabon. The coffee reminds you of sitting at your favorite book store when you read that book, remember the one I'm talking about. The rubber soled shoes remind you of school clothes shopping with your mother, what a nightmare that was. . . Each memory is as brief as the scent is, they do not linger. That was the sensation I had when reading Mr. Darcy, Vampyre. I would catch a phrase, paragraph or sentence that would briefly, but not quite remind me of other books and movies I had once enjoyed. A bit of Dracula here, but not really. Almost a piece of Radiers of the Lost Ark, but no. . . Was that Twilight I saw, couldn't be. . . It was amazing how Grange was able to do this all the while making the vampire story her own.I worried before reading this book that the vampyre story had been over done and there was nothing new a writer could bring to the table. I admit, I was wrong. Grange is able to make her vamprye utterly new and different. My favorite part of any vamprye story is their history, what have they done with all this time they have had to live? Grange is able to make her vamprye's history compelling, heart breaking and triumphant all at once.more
In this fan follow up to Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre beings with the marriage of Elizabeth and Darcy. The happy occasion is only momentarily sullied by Darcy’s silence and reserve, as well as a moment where Elizabeth reads a particular expression of distress on his face. The two of them embark together on their wedding tour throughout Europe, and the good spirit in Elizabeth’s heart is slowly cast into shadow the more aloof Darcy becomes. Rather, though he is affectionate, there seems a wall that Elizabeth cannot penetrate and she begins to question his love for her. Despite being married, Darcy is refraining from physical affections and Elizabeth wonders if she is the cause, and if Darcy regrets their union since many in his family are not too pleased with their marriage.Strange things begin to happen as the newlyweds travel and visit various cities on their tour. Bats are found flying around the windows, ethereal and beautiful friends of Darcy recall memories of times long past, reflections in mirrors are not cast, and there seems a strange pull to Darcy that is hypnotic and unnatural. While in the castle of a distant uncle of Darcy’s, a Count, an omen is cast that says Elizabeth will cause the death of Darcy. Also, they are driven from the castle by an attack of villagers brandishing weapons and torches, very Frankenstein. During the attack, Elizabeth glimpses something strange about Darcy that she readily brushes off. But the strangeness does not end there. In the palazzo of a Prince, Elizabeth find a book full of illustrations that leave her with a sense of déjà vu and a vision of a fire that she couldn’t possibly remember. During this visit, she again glimpses something in Darcy that causes her to faint and promptly forget. About this time, tired of Darcy’s lack of affection, Elizabeth decides to leave for home. Everything that has happened is all very strange and upsetting to Elizabeth who soon learns that she is the target of something more sinister than her ill-feelings could have predicted.In some ways, Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is reminiscent of those stunning and dark gothic fiction novels in the style of Shelley and Poe. There are a lot of shadowy undertones and a subtle, sublime feeling of dread that is sliced up by lighter, more romantic moments. In this way, you are taken on the same rollercoaster of light and dark as Elizabeth, feeling the darkness as keenly as she does, and delighting in the happier moments. Grange is very good with how she writes scenes and descriptions so that they flow beautifully and can be easily imagined with vivid detail.Yet I was ultimately disappointed by the book. The bulk of the book was spent on travels and meeting and talking to new people, and as such it was very slow and with minimal excitement. The true nature of Darcy wasn’t even revealed until the nearly the end of the book, and his vampire self was only hinted to slightly. There was very little vampyre in Mr. Darcy, Vamypre. I had expected a lot more out of the book and had thought Elizabeth would interact more with Darcy as a vampire instead of hearing his secret and promptly having a miraculous way arise to rid him of his ‘curse.’ I was even more let down by the very convenient and easy way by which Darcy was cured of his vampiric affliction. It was just so… sentimental and silly. I had at least hoped that the ending would be climactic and thrilling since it drug on so long to the big reveal only to be disappointed. Fortunately for Austen fans, the book is quite good in its characterizations of both Elizabeth and Darcy. In short: was it a good book? Yes, it was. I enjoyed reading it very much, I just think it to be a bit overrated as far as vampire books go and the ending was very quick, too easy, and anti-climactic.more
Synopsis:Mr. Darcy, Vampyre continues the stories of Jane Austen's main characters from Pride and Prejudice from the night before the double wedding of Fitzwilliam Darcy to Elizabeth Bennett and of Charles Bingley to Jane Bennett.After the ceremony, Elizabeth and Darcy head to Europe for their honeymoon. As Darcy introduces Elizabeth to his friends and experiences in the continent, something feels wrong to Elizabeth. Unsure about the source of her misgivings, Elizabeth begins to wonder about the strength of their bond to each other. Through Elizabeth's letters to her sister Jane, we learn of Elizabeth's increasing anxiety. While there are hints that the problems between Darcy and Elizabeth are of an unusual nature, Amanda Grange's depiction of their characters remains similar to Austen's original.Review:This is Amanda Grange's latest entry into the creative interpretation of Pride and Prejudice and my first time to read a creative interpretation of this sort. To be honest, I wasn't sure how much of a purist I would turn out to be. I enjoyed reading Amanda Grange's characterization of Elizabeth and Darcy because she captured their personalities and interaction so well. For those willing to imagine Elizabeth and Darcy taking an odd turn into an alternative reality, this book is an enjoyable read. You have your beloved characters in a new setting. I highly recommend Mr. Darcy, Vampyre to those who enjoyed Pride and Prejudice and would be interested in exploring different directions that Elizabeth and Darcy might take, particularly those who enjoy vampire stories along the lines of Anne Rice. Publisher: Sourcebooks Landmark (August 1, 2009), 320 pages.Courtesy of Sourcebooks Landmark.more
It would seem that the author had some great raw material; Austen's Darcy and vampires! How delicious! What an opportunity for creativity! Alas, I have been sorely disappointed. The prose itself is pedestrian and aimed at 6th graders. The story moves oh so slowly. Ms. Grange's vampires don't bite; instead they throw dances, buy property, and travel. Yawn. This story has no meat.more
If you do not know already, Pride and Prejudice is my all time favorite book and I have found it really hard to find any good related/sequel books. Since I love vampires and Pride & Prejudice I was really curious how this book would turn out. I’m glad to say I am pleasantly surprised by how well it was written.The story picks up right before the wedding between Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth and Jane and Mr. Bingley. I felt Grange stayed true to Lizzie’s character even while she is dealing with all the strangeness that occurs after her wedding day. What I enjoyed was that this book was not all blood and gore with the secret revelation by Mr. Darcy coming early on and it being an action/horror book. The main focus was still the relationship between Darcy and Elizabeth. The style of writing was fun and enjoyable (is that redundant?). I enjoyed the little bits like when Elizabeth eats spaghetti for the first time.If you are a fan of Pride and Prejudice then you should definitely check this one out. There are a lot of references to the original book but even so I think people who have not read Pride & Prejudice would still enjoy this book.more
"Her attention was attracted by movement close at hand and she saw the dark shape of a bird--no, a bat--heading towards the window. She closed it quickly, leaving the bat to hover outside. As she looked at it she was seized with a strange feeling. She thought how lonely it must feel, being shut out; being a part and yet not a part of the warmth and light within." (Page 67 of the ARC)Amanda Grange's Mr. Darcy, Vampyre, published by Sourcebooks, catches up with Mr. & Mrs. Darcy right before their nuptials and follows them along their wedding tour. As plans change and the Darcys spontaneously tour Europe, mingling with Mr. Darcy's friends, Elizabeth begins to feel that there is a deep dark secret her husband is hiding from her.Throughout the novel, Grange adheres to Jane Austen's characters and the time in which those characters live. Readers of Pride & Prejudice may have wondered why Fitzwilliam Darcy was so reserved, but Grange provides a paranormal alternative to mere position and wealth considerations in the 19th century. The lush landscape and dramatic plot will suck readers into Mr. Darcy, Vampyre as readers travel with Elizabeth and Darcy through Paris, Italy, and the Alps."She needed no urging. The sumptuous atmosphere was starting to oppress her and the strangely sinuous people were unsettling. She was relieved to get outside and breathe the fresh air.Night hung over the city like a dark mantle, pierced with the light of flambeaux and, up above, there seemed to be a thousand stars." (Page 47 of ARC)Elizabeth is captivated by her foreign surroundings, but eventually she begins to feel weary of her new acquaintances and the tension in her marriage. Readers will grow anxious and paranoid just as Elizabeth does. From bandits and wolves in the woods outside a secluded castle to the reappearance of Lady Catherine de Bourgh and her ties to Darcy's secret, Grange weaves a twisted narrative that leaves Elizabeth, Darcy, and readers on the edge of their seats.Mr. Darcy, Vampyre is a paranormal continuation of Austen's Pride & Prejudice that is executed successfully. Grange is a master of this time period and her imagination shines through in this novel. It took me less than 3 days to read this novel in the free time I had at home. Readers will be absorbed by this paranormal world.more
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