Reader reviews for The Outcast

Jaypaw, the apprentice of a medicine cat, is blind, thoughh he a chosen cat of a prophecy. In this book, Jaypaw and his two siblings set out to help a Tribe in the mountains.While at the mountains, the three cats (and the other cats that were chosen in THE NEW PROPHECY; Tawnypelt, Brambleclaw, Crowfeather, and additional Stormfur, and Squirrelflight. Brook is Stormfur's mate, so she also comes along.) thrive to help the Tribe. The tribe cats are starving because some rogues are stealing their pray. They learned by watching the prey-hunters catch their food, and then learned them, and copied them to eat their food. Because of all this commotion, the clan cats have to teach them some fighting moves, and help them take what is theirs. The clan cats teach them how to fight, defend, and mark their borders.After all that training, they are finally able to fend those horrible rogues off, and the clan cats finally head for home.
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Not the best one in the series; didn't have a lot going on in the book. It wasn't as interesting as the other books.
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Outcast was an AWESOME book!!!!! The "outcastS" are Brook and Stromfur. Find out yourself why! Although this book was great, the battle was not as exciting as I hoped.
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I got this book for two reasons:1) I was intrigued by the title.2) It was nominated for the Booker, and I almost always like Booker picks.I read it over the last two days, and I loved it. But I think it's one of those love it or hate it books. I was sort of surprised at how much I loved it because it breaks my Number One Rule requiring standardized punctuation so I don't lose my freakin' mind. There were no (NO) quotation marks in the entire book. And it didn't make me crazy. Not once did I feel like putting the book down and writing a nastygram to the author. That's a big deal for me.So, let me tell you why I loved it. I know I overuse these words but I'm going to do it again. . .it was heartbreaking and beautiful. But not beautiful like any other novel I've read recently. Beautiful because it's much more like a 270 page poem than a novel. As a matter of fact, it reminded me of this quote from Ian McEwan's Saturday: Novels and movies, being restlessly modern, propel you forwards or backwards through time, through days, years or even generations. But to do its noticing and judging, poetry balances itself on the pinprick of the moment. Slowing down, stopping yourself completely, to read and understand a poem is like trying to acquire an old-fashioned skill like dry-stone walling or trout tickling.This one did have some plot, but it was much more about noticing things, seeing what we are normally in too much of a hurry to see. The title actually comes from this quote late in the book: He says this is a very big world and there are many many things you could miss if you are not careful. He says there are remarkable things all the time, right in front of us. . .and our lives are paler and poorer if we do not see them for what they are. He says, if nobody speaks of remarkable things, how can they be called remarkable?Beautiful book. Just beautiful.
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A story that watches neighbours on a street interacting and sometimes seeing actions that are evidence of extraordinary goings on. Intriguing suspense and some quirky characters add to a lyrical tale written with depth and insight. Given the Betty Trask Award, the Somerset Maugham Award, and was on the Booker Prize longlist and the Waverton Good Read Award longlist.Highly recommended.
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This book scores incredibly highly on the modern literature gimmickry checklist. Let's see now......Not a speech mark in the place...CHECKHardly any of the characters named....CHECKHanging paragraphs....hmmm that's innovative....CHECKSpeech reported warts and all so it takes three readings of each sentence to make out what is being said ...CHECKMost of the commas and a good few full-stops left out....CHECKOn that basis it should be a bestseller! The trouble is it's a tough read, made tougher by the fact that the event central to the 'story' is withheld until the very end, stretching the reader's capacity to care about the nameless characters and their formless angst.To give the author his due, he can write very good poetic prose, and dreams up some interesting scenarios. The trouble is, it's all a bit Turner Prize. As though someone painted a brilliant picture, but instead of just framing it and letting people enjoy it, he scribbled all over it so it was impossible to see what was originally there.
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Interesting and well written book about an individual who is narrating her story over the past few months, and details of an incident which changed her life written from the perspective of the people who lived on one street during that one day. Difficult to put into words, but a good read all the same.
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A beautiful book. It reads more like poetry than a novel at times. The opening description of a street in an English town is wonderful. Most characters aren't named, and are just referred to by where they live or by a distinguishing feature, which makes it a little difficult at first to grasp who is who, but it is so beautifully written and the sentiments in it so true, that this ceased to matter soon.
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I didn't really take to this book at all. I suppose I'm opposed to the thesis. The mundane by definition can't be remarkable. In reality beauty is in our relationship to the mundane; our ability to see beyond it to a deeper meaning. The book keeps you waiting to reveal the nature of a terrible incident whilst relating the actions of characters living in one urban street. Yet surely why we do things is the great mystery; to investigate what we do is like exploring the workings of a toaster to find its soul. Many people really like this book, I guess I'm just not one of them.
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This novel is a collection of successes and failures, from achievements both sentence by sentence and in a larger, conceptual sense, to shortcomings on similar levels. It requires an initial push and patience, and a tolerance for sometimes cheap-seeming suspense tactics, but the pay-off is good. In short, and without spoiling anything, the book begins (after it gets done with a several page description that isn't quite all it might be) by saying, "Oh, this extraordinary thing has happened," and we sense it's a terrible thing, and because it's extraordinary and because of its impact, yes, we absolutely want to know what it is. One can't (and can) quite imagine what on Earth could have happened. (And then, of course, one has a vague idea.) Beginning this way, however, seems to put too much pressure on that final Thing: the mystery business, which emerges elsewhere in the revelation and withholding of other crucial bits of information (in addition to the big one spanning the entire novel), is both a testament to the author's sustained control, but as well something that can get rather tiresome. It's almost as though Jon McGregor didn't trust us enough to read this novel through without something tugging us the whole way. Once you give up your frustrations, though, (why is he insisting on being so dubious?!) and allow yourself to concentrate more on the scenes that can be rather beautiful, the book falls into a kind of loveliness. There are wonderful lines and wonderful scenes both touching and frightening, and when the narrative settles down and delivers, it is almost always very satisfying and fresh.
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