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Topics: Epistolary Novels, New York City, Mistaken Identity, Funny, Romantic, 2000s, Neighbors, Love, Crime, and 21st Century

Published: HarperCollins on Mar 17, 2009
ISBN: 9780061828867
List price: $5.99
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Had the hard copy when I was younger read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I enjoyed this book alotread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
3.5 starsread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Gently funny epistolatory chicklit set in Manhattan and the world of journalism.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a very fun, quick read. It wasn’t terribly original or anything special, but for pulp fiction it did just fine. The romantic lead reminded me a bit too much of Carter from ER (trust kid living like a normal middle-class person, first name is John, Grandma is too much in his life and trying to get him a woman), but the main character and her gabby best friend were fun. Oh yeah, and the e-mail format was a welcome change and very fluid. The reconciliation part was too fast and easy. You knew they were going to get back together, but that’s supposed to be the best part of the movie (book, I mean book!).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Ah, the modern epistolary romance*! This one is conducted entirely via email and is quite charming. As with all epistolary stories, there's a certain level of incredulity that people would sit around typing all this stuff up, though every romance comes with a certain incredulity threshold so this isn't particularly an obstacle. I like the email style, in part, because it takes so much less time to write a quick little email (say an hour) than long rambling letters (staying up all night) and the book takes place over a span of -months- so you don't have to imagine that they're writing all night, every night, like, for instance, Richardson's "Pamela".The problems I had with the email style were that A) the subject lines were frequently the first half of the first sentence of the email. That's not how I write emails, that's not how the people with whom I correspond write emails, and, quite frankly, I usually didn't read the subject line until I realized I'd missed half the sentence and had to go back; B) one of the minor characters kept overhearing the protagonist and her best friend discussing things in the bathroom (they all work together) except we, the readers, know what they were discussing because they'd just exchanged detailed emails about it. Who writes an email, writing out everything in detail, and then runs off to the bathroom to repeat all the same information? One of those two exchanges should be scarce on details, either a shorter "meet me in the bathroom so I can tell you everything" email or a bathroom conversation that doesn't bother to repeat everything all over again. Also, wouldn't you, eventually, start looking to see if any of the stalls are occupied?But I did enjoy the story, and I believed that the characters got to know each other over a span of time and fell in love. This is as opposed to the subsequent novels :o)*Part of me really wants to write an essay comparing modern epistolary romances to those of the late 18th century (Richardson, Burney, et al). I should possibly track down more modern examples, by other authors.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The epistolary novel is not dead, but now it is email. There were places where straight narrative would have made this story better.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute book all written in e-mail formatread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Boy Next Door is told entirely in emails between the characters. It's copy-written in 2002 so the characters all have dial-up and can't email and talk on the phone at the same time. It was pretty funny to realize how much technology has changed in just eight years. Anyway, having the story told entirely in emails made the story flow a little awkwardly at times. I definitely had to suspend reality when I found myself wondering if someone would really write an email with that much detail and just go with it.The story is a combination romance and cozy mystery. Melissa Fuller is a single New York writer. The little old lady that lives next door to her is mysteriously attacked and a man claiming to be her nephew comes to live in his aunt's apartment to take care of her pets while she's in the hospital.The mystery plot line of who attacked the aunt kept me guessing for most of the book. The romance plot line was lacking a little something for me. I think the email format kept the chemistry between Melissa and her boyfriend from coming across as well as it would have with a regular format.I listened to the audio book version of this book. The format of this book made it awkward for an audio book because the narrator had to read the subject, sender's email address and recipient's email address for every email. Also, there is a gay character that the narrator voices in a completely over the top and very annoying manner. I think if I would have read the paper version of this book it would have gotten four stars.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm a sap for a cute gimmick in a book; this book has one: it is written totally in e-mails. Lots of fun if you aren't expecting Shakespeare.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this last in the series - but the series is so loosely connected that it didn't really make much difference, although if I could have remembered these characters from book number 2 I could have found out "what happened next". Also written in epistolary style, which contributes to the humor factor. Just goes to show that you really never should lie!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is very problematic for me. When I first read it, I really enjoyed the story. And then I gave it subsequent rereads. The biggest problem I have overall is the characterization. I’m sorry, but I have a very hard time believing that a professional working woman at the age of 27 acts more like an eighteen-year old when it comes to her romantic relationships. Nor do I think that she would have gotten away with some of her actions- such as placing false information, gossip column or not- with as little of a punishment. While I give the story credit for being loose and playful with taking a murder mystery and giving it a romantic comedy flair, the number of clichéd tropes that show up in the book grated me at times. (Such as Nadine’s plotline of being the fat best friend. Yes, she accepts her size 16 body, but she goes on for 200 pages with little development beyond “Omg, I cannot fit into my mother’s wedding dress!”) Oh, and the fact that everyone insists that Mel take back John after it’s discovered that he did, in fact, lie to her: Mel was completely in the right to insist that she couldn’t trust John anymore, and the roundabout way they make up was just too neatly-wrapped up for me. (I love Meg Cabot’s books, I really do, but there are some that I finish and go “Seriously?”)read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
They say it's easy to read but I didn't think so. Some times made me bored so I had taken more than 2 weeks to read up!But ending was OK.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a great book if you only have a minute or two here and there. You can read a bit here and there until you are really caught up in it. A mystery, but told in emails, and while it takes some patience, it is a lot of fun! I also learned a new technique for sending emails.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute and funny, and incredibly fast read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Decided to read this one because I read the sequel first, Boy Meets Girl first. It was very fluffy with an extremely farfetched plot. Cabot, who usually writes YA novels, seems to be confusing teens with adults in her attempts to move away from the YA genre...I said it last time and I'll say it again: stick to Princess Diaries Meg.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A light, fun read. I really liked Mel; she was a character I could relate to. Near the end I realized I already read the book last summer. I was surprised at how well Cabot not only wrote the book in e-mails but made every e-mail believable. Lots of humour making it a good piece of chick-lit!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very cute book! I loved the way it was written entirely in email form. That made it very fun to read. Very funny! Highly recommended if you want a fun book that entertains but doesn't require much thought. Great for the beach or just relaxing and vegging out.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It is an entire book through email. I love when they have a few emails in the book, but not the ENTIRE BOOK! This is the only "Reading with Ripa" book I've read, and I am not impressed.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was my first foray into chick lit, and I would call it a success. The Boy Next Door reads like the inspiration material for a romantic comedy - cute and fluffy with moments of laugh-out-loud hilarity. (Seriously, I could see this book being adapted into an awesome movie!) Like a romantic comedy, the main focus is on the relationship between the hero and the heroine with various obstacles that get in the way, a cast of quirky supporting characters, some situational comedy, and a mystery that needs solving thrown in as a backdrop. It’s light, fun, and romantic, and I finished it in a day.The story is told entirely through email messages, an interesting style that adds humor and suspense, and allows for multiple points of view. The one problem with the email correspondence is that it left me feeling somewhat removed from the real action, especially at the end. When it all gets wrapped up, I felt a little disappointed, like I wanted more out of the story than could be told through emails.But overall, The Boy Next Door is an amusing, entertaining book. It’s not great literature, but it’s not supposed to be. It fit my current mood perfectly, and that’s part of what made it so enjoyable. Though I don’t think I could take a steady diet of chick lit, I wouldn’t be opposed to picking up another book like this at some point in the future.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a laugh out loud delight.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slightly amusing, but I think the email format is very dated now, so what was once amusing ends up being a gimmick that doesn't quite work out of context.

2.75 is more accurate of a rating.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heavy reading? No. Light and funny? Yes! I laughed aloud and read the whole thing one night. It's written all in emails, too funny! Won't leave you with any deep thoughts, but if you're on vacation and want an entertaining get away, this is the book!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book of e-mails based on the life of mel is a fun book to read. This book shows diffrent perspectives. THat includes her boss,ex-boyfriend, nosy colleages, and the man that is pretending to be max freelander. I could not put this book down. This book grasped my attention with its quik humorouse, and believable background.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
told entirely through e-mails. Melissa Fuller, celebrity-gossip columnist for the New York Journal, lives a relatively shallow existence until her elderly neighbor is attacked and sent to the hospital in a coma, leaving behind her Great Dane and two cats. Melissa gets help in caring for them from the man who is supposedly Mrs. Friedlander's playboy nephew Max, but who is actually his college buddy doing him a favor, and it all becomes a bit complicated when Melissa falls in love with "Max." Every loose plot thread comes into play in the highly satisfactory conclusion, with just enough twists on the way for a fun ride.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
another epistolary novel from Meg Cabot, again aimed at an adult audience its a fun, light read.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mel ends up pet sitting her elderly neighbour's dog and cats until a very handsome relative of said neighbour moves in to take over.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Read all reviews

Reviews

Had the hard copy when I was younger
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I enjoyed this book alot
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
3.5 stars
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
3.5
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Gently funny epistolatory chicklit set in Manhattan and the world of journalism.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was a very fun, quick read. It wasn’t terribly original or anything special, but for pulp fiction it did just fine. The romantic lead reminded me a bit too much of Carter from ER (trust kid living like a normal middle-class person, first name is John, Grandma is too much in his life and trying to get him a woman), but the main character and her gabby best friend were fun. Oh yeah, and the e-mail format was a welcome change and very fluid. The reconciliation part was too fast and easy. You knew they were going to get back together, but that’s supposed to be the best part of the movie (book, I mean book!).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Ah, the modern epistolary romance*! This one is conducted entirely via email and is quite charming. As with all epistolary stories, there's a certain level of incredulity that people would sit around typing all this stuff up, though every romance comes with a certain incredulity threshold so this isn't particularly an obstacle. I like the email style, in part, because it takes so much less time to write a quick little email (say an hour) than long rambling letters (staying up all night) and the book takes place over a span of -months- so you don't have to imagine that they're writing all night, every night, like, for instance, Richardson's "Pamela".The problems I had with the email style were that A) the subject lines were frequently the first half of the first sentence of the email. That's not how I write emails, that's not how the people with whom I correspond write emails, and, quite frankly, I usually didn't read the subject line until I realized I'd missed half the sentence and had to go back; B) one of the minor characters kept overhearing the protagonist and her best friend discussing things in the bathroom (they all work together) except we, the readers, know what they were discussing because they'd just exchanged detailed emails about it. Who writes an email, writing out everything in detail, and then runs off to the bathroom to repeat all the same information? One of those two exchanges should be scarce on details, either a shorter "meet me in the bathroom so I can tell you everything" email or a bathroom conversation that doesn't bother to repeat everything all over again. Also, wouldn't you, eventually, start looking to see if any of the stalls are occupied?But I did enjoy the story, and I believed that the characters got to know each other over a span of time and fell in love. This is as opposed to the subsequent novels :o)*Part of me really wants to write an essay comparing modern epistolary romances to those of the late 18th century (Richardson, Burney, et al). I should possibly track down more modern examples, by other authors.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The epistolary novel is not dead, but now it is email. There were places where straight narrative would have made this story better.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute book all written in e-mail format
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
The Boy Next Door is told entirely in emails between the characters. It's copy-written in 2002 so the characters all have dial-up and can't email and talk on the phone at the same time. It was pretty funny to realize how much technology has changed in just eight years. Anyway, having the story told entirely in emails made the story flow a little awkwardly at times. I definitely had to suspend reality when I found myself wondering if someone would really write an email with that much detail and just go with it.The story is a combination romance and cozy mystery. Melissa Fuller is a single New York writer. The little old lady that lives next door to her is mysteriously attacked and a man claiming to be her nephew comes to live in his aunt's apartment to take care of her pets while she's in the hospital.The mystery plot line of who attacked the aunt kept me guessing for most of the book. The romance plot line was lacking a little something for me. I think the email format kept the chemistry between Melissa and her boyfriend from coming across as well as it would have with a regular format.I listened to the audio book version of this book. The format of this book made it awkward for an audio book because the narrator had to read the subject, sender's email address and recipient's email address for every email. Also, there is a gay character that the narrator voices in a completely over the top and very annoying manner. I think if I would have read the paper version of this book it would have gotten four stars.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I'm a sap for a cute gimmick in a book; this book has one: it is written totally in e-mails. Lots of fun if you aren't expecting Shakespeare.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I read this last in the series - but the series is so loosely connected that it didn't really make much difference, although if I could have remembered these characters from book number 2 I could have found out "what happened next". Also written in epistolary style, which contributes to the humor factor. Just goes to show that you really never should lie!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is very problematic for me. When I first read it, I really enjoyed the story. And then I gave it subsequent rereads. The biggest problem I have overall is the characterization. I’m sorry, but I have a very hard time believing that a professional working woman at the age of 27 acts more like an eighteen-year old when it comes to her romantic relationships. Nor do I think that she would have gotten away with some of her actions- such as placing false information, gossip column or not- with as little of a punishment. While I give the story credit for being loose and playful with taking a murder mystery and giving it a romantic comedy flair, the number of clichéd tropes that show up in the book grated me at times. (Such as Nadine’s plotline of being the fat best friend. Yes, she accepts her size 16 body, but she goes on for 200 pages with little development beyond “Omg, I cannot fit into my mother’s wedding dress!”) Oh, and the fact that everyone insists that Mel take back John after it’s discovered that he did, in fact, lie to her: Mel was completely in the right to insist that she couldn’t trust John anymore, and the roundabout way they make up was just too neatly-wrapped up for me. (I love Meg Cabot’s books, I really do, but there are some that I finish and go “Seriously?”)
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
They say it's easy to read but I didn't think so. Some times made me bored so I had taken more than 2 weeks to read up!But ending was OK.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a great book if you only have a minute or two here and there. You can read a bit here and there until you are really caught up in it. A mystery, but told in emails, and while it takes some patience, it is a lot of fun! I also learned a new technique for sending emails.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Cute and funny, and incredibly fast read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Decided to read this one because I read the sequel first, Boy Meets Girl first. It was very fluffy with an extremely farfetched plot. Cabot, who usually writes YA novels, seems to be confusing teens with adults in her attempts to move away from the YA genre...I said it last time and I'll say it again: stick to Princess Diaries Meg.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A light, fun read. I really liked Mel; she was a character I could relate to. Near the end I realized I already read the book last summer. I was surprised at how well Cabot not only wrote the book in e-mails but made every e-mail believable. Lots of humour making it a good piece of chick-lit!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very cute book! I loved the way it was written entirely in email form. That made it very fun to read. Very funny! Highly recommended if you want a fun book that entertains but doesn't require much thought. Great for the beach or just relaxing and vegging out.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
It is an entire book through email. I love when they have a few emails in the book, but not the ENTIRE BOOK! This is the only "Reading with Ripa" book I've read, and I am not impressed.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This was my first foray into chick lit, and I would call it a success. The Boy Next Door reads like the inspiration material for a romantic comedy - cute and fluffy with moments of laugh-out-loud hilarity. (Seriously, I could see this book being adapted into an awesome movie!) Like a romantic comedy, the main focus is on the relationship between the hero and the heroine with various obstacles that get in the way, a cast of quirky supporting characters, some situational comedy, and a mystery that needs solving thrown in as a backdrop. It’s light, fun, and romantic, and I finished it in a day.The story is told entirely through email messages, an interesting style that adds humor and suspense, and allows for multiple points of view. The one problem with the email correspondence is that it left me feeling somewhat removed from the real action, especially at the end. When it all gets wrapped up, I felt a little disappointed, like I wanted more out of the story than could be told through emails.But overall, The Boy Next Door is an amusing, entertaining book. It’s not great literature, but it’s not supposed to be. It fit my current mood perfectly, and that’s part of what made it so enjoyable. Though I don’t think I could take a steady diet of chick lit, I wouldn’t be opposed to picking up another book like this at some point in the future.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is a laugh out loud delight.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Slightly amusing, but I think the email format is very dated now, so what was once amusing ends up being a gimmick that doesn't quite work out of context.

2.75 is more accurate of a rating.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Heavy reading? No. Light and funny? Yes! I laughed aloud and read the whole thing one night. It's written all in emails, too funny! Won't leave you with any deep thoughts, but if you're on vacation and want an entertaining get away, this is the book!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book of e-mails based on the life of mel is a fun book to read. This book shows diffrent perspectives. THat includes her boss,ex-boyfriend, nosy colleages, and the man that is pretending to be max freelander. I could not put this book down. This book grasped my attention with its quik humorouse, and believable background.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
told entirely through e-mails. Melissa Fuller, celebrity-gossip columnist for the New York Journal, lives a relatively shallow existence until her elderly neighbor is attacked and sent to the hospital in a coma, leaving behind her Great Dane and two cats. Melissa gets help in caring for them from the man who is supposedly Mrs. Friedlander's playboy nephew Max, but who is actually his college buddy doing him a favor, and it all becomes a bit complicated when Melissa falls in love with "Max." Every loose plot thread comes into play in the highly satisfactory conclusion, with just enough twists on the way for a fun ride.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
another epistolary novel from Meg Cabot, again aimed at an adult audience its a fun, light read.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Mel ends up pet sitting her elderly neighbour's dog and cats until a very handsome relative of said neighbour moves in to take over.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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