Yup, we’ve got that one

And more than one million more. Become a member today and read free for two weeks.

Read free for two weeks

As the last unvanquished piece of England, Wessex is eyed hungrily by the fearsome Viking conquerors. Uhtred, a dispossessed young nobleman, is tied to the imperiled land by birth and marriage but was raised by the Danish invaders—and he questions where his allegiance must lie. But blood is his destiny, and when the overwhelming Viking horde attacks out of a wintry darkness, Uhtred must put aside all hatred and distrust and stand beside his embattled country’s staunch defender—the fugitive King Alfred.

New York Times bestselling author Bernard Cornwell’s The Pale Horseman is a gripping, monumental adventure that gives breathtaking life to one of the most important epochs in English history.

“Cornwell’s characters are vividly drawn, betrayals lurk around every corner, the humor is as sharp as the swords, and the action is non-stop.” —NPR

Topics: War, Vikings, Norse Mythology, Kings, Priests, Violent, First Person Narration, Medieval Period, England, Ireland, and Series

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061801914
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Pale Horseman
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.
Bernard Cornwell lives part of his year here in Charleston. If you time it right, you can walk along one of our Charleston streets, and hear a madman ranting in an attic room -- only it's not a madman, it's a literary wonder named Cornwell, ranting and raving in the creation of a scene for whatever novel he's working on. In fact, carriage tour guides look forward to driving by his house, as he sometimes throws things from the windows as he creates his scenes. You know it's been a first rate tour if your carriage is thus blessed.Cornwell once again brought the sights, smells, and sounds to life from the days of Alfred the Great, when the land was torn by war. While I never particularly really liked the main character, or any of the others, I still followed the story with great interest. This is no dry history book, but vibrates with earthiness that I have no doubt is grounded in reality of the time. I remain amazed at Cornwell's amazing skill at depicting a battle, with accuracy and intricacy, holding this reader's interest for each slash and parry. I'm not a blood and guts sort of girl, but these battles are fascinating to me.I've heard Mr Cornwell fo readings, and know that he is a skilled actor as well as a gifted writer. He also spends part of his year up in New England, where he participates in Summer Stock. Though I was initially disappointed he did not read this particular version of the book, the voice actor was really good. This book is is the second book in the Saxon series focusing on England essentially before it was England. It's a time in history that fascinates me. I wish that Cornwell had been writing back in the days when I was studying history at Uni, or when I was living in England for part of that course of studies. His writing would have been good course requirements for any History major.more
I got this book at a library sale back in 2007, and just finally got around to reading it. Even though it's the second book in the series, it stands alone really well. This is the first work of historical fiction with which I have ever been impressed. Cornwell does an excellent job making a blood-thirsty warrior play out in a sympathetic way. While the naming conventions of the time make some of the characters a little confusing, I thoroughly enjoyed every chapter of this work.more
The Pale Horseman is book two in the King Alfred novels following The Last Kingdom.This is my third Cornwell series and my tenth book of his overall which means nothing if you know anything about Cornwell as an author. He’s an extremely prolific writer and I’ve barely touch his long list of titles. It makes me happy knowing I still have all that reading ahead of me.Uhtred, the Saxon raised as a Dane, is once more a pain in King Alfred’s side. Knowing Uhtred would go back to the Dane’s given the chance, he attempts to keep a leash on him but roping him in with religion and responsibility does nothing for Uhtred’s mood. Bored with a farmer’s life, he goes out raiding and meets up with a Dane named Svein who has ambition, ships, and men to back up his wild claims. Svein impresses Uhtred but he still isn’t ready to run back to the Danes, even if that’s where his heart is. Uhtred doesn’t like King Alfred but when the Danes attack, Uhtred finds himself by King Alfred’s side arguing with him over leadership and war skills. Though he never expected it, he is now doing everything he can to keep Alfred on the throne.As a main character, Uhtred is wonderfully hateful and I mean that in a good way. He’s selfish, impulsive, violent, and a warrior through and through. He’s what I picture a Saxon raised among war faring Danes to be like. He hates his king but stands by him even going so far as to give him his oath; whether he likes to admit it or not. Loyalty means much to Uhtred but he struggles with it. He owes it to Alfred as his king but would sneak away to the Danes if he could and the thought crosses his mind more than once. When the opportunity comes up, he doesn’t go, surprising even himself but when the fight comes he avoids his friends not wanting to face them.I know very little of Alfred’s actual history other than his being very smart and pious. This story is told by Uhtred so his portrayal is less than flattering. Being a pagan also shapes many of Uhtred’s views --- his wife whom he once ran home from a battle to be with is now someone he can’t stand to be around. Her religion is a main a sticking point between the two. He finds a new woman, a pagan priestess, to replace her and while you know he enjoys her company, you also wonder if he does it just to show he’s still pagan and not willing to bend the knee to both Alfred and his religion.Cornwell is as graphic as ever in the thick of the battle scenes --- bones, flesh, and teeth crushing loudly and violently. It’s a rough time, around 870 A.D. or there about, so at least he is true to the period; something I always appreciate about his writing even if I don’t always revel in it.It’s taken me a number of months to return to this series, not for lack of want, but because of other books that have come into my life. In fact, two additional books have been published in this series since I began reading Cornwell’s books. I don’t plan to let that much time pass between now and the next book.more
Amazing tale. More blood and guts. Creative twists. Finished this one on the heels of the first one and am swiftly moving onto the third!!more
I feel a lot of similarity between this and his Arthur series, Uthred is very similar to Derfel, just a little more bloodthirsty and a little less cuddly. Uthred is probably an accurate representation of a 21 year old Saxon warrior, this doesn't make his especially likeable however. Hey, there's a reason these are called the Dark Ages. But he does have a suitably early period outlook on life. "Ale, women and reputation, nothing else matters." I know people that are living this. I enjoyed it, I'd rather see a new 18th century series from Cornwell though. (Not Sharpe, that one should stay put to bed).more
The Pale Horseman reads fast and is highly entertaining during the battle scenes, but these characters are predictable, particularly because Uhtred is narrating the whole story in past tense so I know he is never in danger of dying. There are times when I worry though. Everyone around Uhtred dies, except for the highly obnoxious people. Plus Uhtred, like Durfel, isn't very intelligent so I'm constantly yelling "you idiot, this is the most obvious trap of all traps". So far, I am not to all impressed with King Alfred's ability to lead. When does this "great" moniker start coming into play. It's all in good fun. Raiding, shield walls, pillaging, sex, killing some priests, sailing, more killing. The good life?Give this to your male friend who doesn't have the patience for Neal Stephenson or G.M. Fraiser. I'm thinking your rugby playing, pint downing, rarely reads type friend. This just might get him interested in a bit of English history and give you something to talk about at the pub when your bored of sports.As always with Cornwell, I do appreciate his short historical notes section in the back, but I would very much like to see an extended list of related reading attached. This thrown bone is small and unsatisfying.more
I liked this book a lot. I think this is one of the better historical fiction series out there. The relationship between Alfred and Uthred is a believable one, and I could imagine existing in the time period.My only issue with the group was the hurried ending. I just thought it was a little contrived. Now I am sure this is what the author wanted, but to me it seemed rushed. A little more explaination after the battle would have been appreciated. But I am sure that is what the next volume in the series is all about.Highly recomended series if you are at all interested in history, war and religon.more
Second in The Saxon Chronicles trilogy.This middle book is concerned with Alfred’s desperate attempt to stave of defeat by the Danes, after they break the truce negotiated earlier and invade Wessex. Alfred is forced to hide in the marshlands of Wessex, while the Danes run rampant over the rest of his kingdom. Uhtred, the young narrator of the story, aids Alfred despite Uhtred’s inherent dislike of Alfred and especially Alfred’s Christian piety, which Uhtred views as excessive and dangerous to the welfare of the kingdom.Based on historical reality, Cornwell does his usual outstanding job of creating a believable world with believable characters. His battle descriptions are superb. In my opinion, he has no peer in the historical action-adventure genre. Highly recommended.more
The prose in The Pale Horseman is hurried, rambling, with historical inaccuracies and cardboard characters, all of it in need of an editor. Agreed there is little historical record of England's Alfred the Great; however, it is known he overcame a Danish invasion against staggering odds, unifying the squabbling tribes of Saxons, Mercian and some Britons. Yet Cornwell chooses to portray Alfred as an indecisive, toady of the Church, who only gained his kingdom and victory because of some swaggering, selfish, testosterone-ridden fictional Saxon hero. Doesn't wash.Add to that a propensity for run-on sentences, two glaring technical faux-pas (that linen bowstrings are unusable when wet, and arm-rings worn over chain mail), and you have a recipe for a frustrating and disappointing read.more
This is the sequel to The Last Kingdom, which I reviewed a few days ago. I had problems with that book because the protagonist, Uhtred, was an unsympathetic jerk. The historical detail was great, but I'm not too keen on reading about drinking, whores, and swordplay, even if it does play to accuracy. However, I still pressed onward with the trilogy..... and almost stopped a few chapters in. Uhtred, torn between being a Saxon by birth and a Dane in spirit, decided to masquerade as a Viking and do Viking things. Ugh. However, he did slowly mature as the book progressed. King Alfred insists that the Danes can be brought to Christ and does his utmost to promote peace. The Danes, however, do not agree. When Alfred is forced to flee and Uhtred grudgingly becomes his champion, the entire future of Wessex - and England - hang in the balance.I much preferred this book to the predecessor. This one had actual character development. I still didn't like Uhtred, but I no longer wished for his manbits to be ravaged by syphilis. Cornwell is a superb writer. His battle scenes sometimes are almost too heavy in detail, but it's interesting stuff. However, I have no gripping desire to read the next book in the trilogy. If I can find it for cheap somewhere, I'll buy it, but I'm in no rush. I won't be keeping either The Last Kingdom or The Pale Horseman.more
This book has been a wonderful continuation of the story of Uhtred and his journey to make his allegiance to King Alfred in the struggle against the Danes. I am fully enjoying this 2nd book in the Saxon chronicles series.more
Better than the first one. Still no revenge but just kept me more interested. A little repetitous with the "Fate is inexorable" thing.more
An excellent history capturing life and hardship with an accurate renditon of the relationships of the warring factions, paganism versus the new God of Rome; alas the characters suffer some as a result as does the plt which lacks a certain crispness. Still a great adventure read!more
Utred trying to save his home.... A great Read..more
Bernard Cornwell, perhaps our best writer of the historical adventure novel today, again scores high with the second book in his Saxon Stories. I'm a devoted follower of Cornwell, and in my opinion, these books rank with the better Sharpe stories and exceed The Heretic. The Pale Horseman tells the historical story of the 9th-century Danish (Norse or 'Viking') invasion and Alfred's struggle for the survival of Wessex and his idea of a united England. The Danes have already defeated Northumbria, East Anglia, and Mercia. Then the Danes broke the truce and Alfred's kingdom shrunk to an area of vast swamps and tidal flats known as the Somerset Levels. With the help of our fictional warrior, Uhtred, a man caught between loyalty and desire, Alfred rallies the fyrd - a people's army of sorts - to the great battle of Ethandun in 878 CE. Alfred's victory saved Wessex and indeed the possibility of "England" - a Danish victory and perhaps that island would be called Daneland (although had the Danes never invaded Alfred would never have had the opportunity to unite the disparate Saxon kingdoms). In any event, much remains to be done. Alas, we must await Cornwell's third installment, The Lords of the North due out in the US in January 2007. Highly recommended for fans of Cornwell or anyone who enjoys historical adventure stories. The battle descriptions put the reader right in the clash of steel, the chanting, the roaring insults, banging of shields, blood, earthy human odors, the bloodlust, the horrible injuries and brutal deaths.more
"A young man stumbled back of Osric's fyrd and vomited. Two dogs ran to eat the vomit." Gross but oh so Cornwell. He always takes the time to delineate with the minutiae of life while two armies stand off in the rain, cold and mud with the fate of a future England at stake. Cornwell has proven over and over again to be a fantastic thrilling author, with titillating combat and an array of characters that truly entrance the reader. With the second book in the Saxon series Cornwell continues to captivate. I can’t wait to read the next novel.more
In the second of this series Uhtred assumes a much more sarcastic tone when relaying the events - and his caustic judgements - to the reader. If you read the first in this series, you will note that this book continues with Uhtred's struggle to regain his lands and balancre his love of the Danes with supporting Alfred, who is still oppressive with his Christian outlook. This tension, coupled with Uhtred's roguesh amore fate, drives Uhtred from rebellious adventure back to supporting Alfred in his quest to protect England from the Danes.more
The first half of this book did not appeal, being full of slaughter and Uhtred's endless agonising over whether he remains loyal to his Saxon roots or to his acquired Danish loyalties, but rather weak on plot. The second half was better on plot, rising to an exciting ending, though I still do not like Uhtred's character.more
3rd in the series and there is probably more to come. Ends with the battle at Ethandun probably the White Horse, Bratton Camp. Cornwell tells a good story and moves it a good pace. Highly enjoyablemore
Exquisite historical detail makes The Pale Horseman come to life. The characters breathe. Very readable as a stand alone book even though it is one of a planned trilogy. This time of history, such an intense time of transition and turning points, is beautifully captured by Cornwell. I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.more
Read all 21 reviews

Reviews

Bernard Cornwell lives part of his year here in Charleston. If you time it right, you can walk along one of our Charleston streets, and hear a madman ranting in an attic room -- only it's not a madman, it's a literary wonder named Cornwell, ranting and raving in the creation of a scene for whatever novel he's working on. In fact, carriage tour guides look forward to driving by his house, as he sometimes throws things from the windows as he creates his scenes. You know it's been a first rate tour if your carriage is thus blessed.Cornwell once again brought the sights, smells, and sounds to life from the days of Alfred the Great, when the land was torn by war. While I never particularly really liked the main character, or any of the others, I still followed the story with great interest. This is no dry history book, but vibrates with earthiness that I have no doubt is grounded in reality of the time. I remain amazed at Cornwell's amazing skill at depicting a battle, with accuracy and intricacy, holding this reader's interest for each slash and parry. I'm not a blood and guts sort of girl, but these battles are fascinating to me.I've heard Mr Cornwell fo readings, and know that he is a skilled actor as well as a gifted writer. He also spends part of his year up in New England, where he participates in Summer Stock. Though I was initially disappointed he did not read this particular version of the book, the voice actor was really good. This book is is the second book in the Saxon series focusing on England essentially before it was England. It's a time in history that fascinates me. I wish that Cornwell had been writing back in the days when I was studying history at Uni, or when I was living in England for part of that course of studies. His writing would have been good course requirements for any History major.more
I got this book at a library sale back in 2007, and just finally got around to reading it. Even though it's the second book in the series, it stands alone really well. This is the first work of historical fiction with which I have ever been impressed. Cornwell does an excellent job making a blood-thirsty warrior play out in a sympathetic way. While the naming conventions of the time make some of the characters a little confusing, I thoroughly enjoyed every chapter of this work.more
The Pale Horseman is book two in the King Alfred novels following The Last Kingdom.This is my third Cornwell series and my tenth book of his overall which means nothing if you know anything about Cornwell as an author. He’s an extremely prolific writer and I’ve barely touch his long list of titles. It makes me happy knowing I still have all that reading ahead of me.Uhtred, the Saxon raised as a Dane, is once more a pain in King Alfred’s side. Knowing Uhtred would go back to the Dane’s given the chance, he attempts to keep a leash on him but roping him in with religion and responsibility does nothing for Uhtred’s mood. Bored with a farmer’s life, he goes out raiding and meets up with a Dane named Svein who has ambition, ships, and men to back up his wild claims. Svein impresses Uhtred but he still isn’t ready to run back to the Danes, even if that’s where his heart is. Uhtred doesn’t like King Alfred but when the Danes attack, Uhtred finds himself by King Alfred’s side arguing with him over leadership and war skills. Though he never expected it, he is now doing everything he can to keep Alfred on the throne.As a main character, Uhtred is wonderfully hateful and I mean that in a good way. He’s selfish, impulsive, violent, and a warrior through and through. He’s what I picture a Saxon raised among war faring Danes to be like. He hates his king but stands by him even going so far as to give him his oath; whether he likes to admit it or not. Loyalty means much to Uhtred but he struggles with it. He owes it to Alfred as his king but would sneak away to the Danes if he could and the thought crosses his mind more than once. When the opportunity comes up, he doesn’t go, surprising even himself but when the fight comes he avoids his friends not wanting to face them.I know very little of Alfred’s actual history other than his being very smart and pious. This story is told by Uhtred so his portrayal is less than flattering. Being a pagan also shapes many of Uhtred’s views --- his wife whom he once ran home from a battle to be with is now someone he can’t stand to be around. Her religion is a main a sticking point between the two. He finds a new woman, a pagan priestess, to replace her and while you know he enjoys her company, you also wonder if he does it just to show he’s still pagan and not willing to bend the knee to both Alfred and his religion.Cornwell is as graphic as ever in the thick of the battle scenes --- bones, flesh, and teeth crushing loudly and violently. It’s a rough time, around 870 A.D. or there about, so at least he is true to the period; something I always appreciate about his writing even if I don’t always revel in it.It’s taken me a number of months to return to this series, not for lack of want, but because of other books that have come into my life. In fact, two additional books have been published in this series since I began reading Cornwell’s books. I don’t plan to let that much time pass between now and the next book.more
Amazing tale. More blood and guts. Creative twists. Finished this one on the heels of the first one and am swiftly moving onto the third!!more
I feel a lot of similarity between this and his Arthur series, Uthred is very similar to Derfel, just a little more bloodthirsty and a little less cuddly. Uthred is probably an accurate representation of a 21 year old Saxon warrior, this doesn't make his especially likeable however. Hey, there's a reason these are called the Dark Ages. But he does have a suitably early period outlook on life. "Ale, women and reputation, nothing else matters." I know people that are living this. I enjoyed it, I'd rather see a new 18th century series from Cornwell though. (Not Sharpe, that one should stay put to bed).more
The Pale Horseman reads fast and is highly entertaining during the battle scenes, but these characters are predictable, particularly because Uhtred is narrating the whole story in past tense so I know he is never in danger of dying. There are times when I worry though. Everyone around Uhtred dies, except for the highly obnoxious people. Plus Uhtred, like Durfel, isn't very intelligent so I'm constantly yelling "you idiot, this is the most obvious trap of all traps". So far, I am not to all impressed with King Alfred's ability to lead. When does this "great" moniker start coming into play. It's all in good fun. Raiding, shield walls, pillaging, sex, killing some priests, sailing, more killing. The good life?Give this to your male friend who doesn't have the patience for Neal Stephenson or G.M. Fraiser. I'm thinking your rugby playing, pint downing, rarely reads type friend. This just might get him interested in a bit of English history and give you something to talk about at the pub when your bored of sports.As always with Cornwell, I do appreciate his short historical notes section in the back, but I would very much like to see an extended list of related reading attached. This thrown bone is small and unsatisfying.more
I liked this book a lot. I think this is one of the better historical fiction series out there. The relationship between Alfred and Uthred is a believable one, and I could imagine existing in the time period.My only issue with the group was the hurried ending. I just thought it was a little contrived. Now I am sure this is what the author wanted, but to me it seemed rushed. A little more explaination after the battle would have been appreciated. But I am sure that is what the next volume in the series is all about.Highly recomended series if you are at all interested in history, war and religon.more
Second in The Saxon Chronicles trilogy.This middle book is concerned with Alfred’s desperate attempt to stave of defeat by the Danes, after they break the truce negotiated earlier and invade Wessex. Alfred is forced to hide in the marshlands of Wessex, while the Danes run rampant over the rest of his kingdom. Uhtred, the young narrator of the story, aids Alfred despite Uhtred’s inherent dislike of Alfred and especially Alfred’s Christian piety, which Uhtred views as excessive and dangerous to the welfare of the kingdom.Based on historical reality, Cornwell does his usual outstanding job of creating a believable world with believable characters. His battle descriptions are superb. In my opinion, he has no peer in the historical action-adventure genre. Highly recommended.more
The prose in The Pale Horseman is hurried, rambling, with historical inaccuracies and cardboard characters, all of it in need of an editor. Agreed there is little historical record of England's Alfred the Great; however, it is known he overcame a Danish invasion against staggering odds, unifying the squabbling tribes of Saxons, Mercian and some Britons. Yet Cornwell chooses to portray Alfred as an indecisive, toady of the Church, who only gained his kingdom and victory because of some swaggering, selfish, testosterone-ridden fictional Saxon hero. Doesn't wash.Add to that a propensity for run-on sentences, two glaring technical faux-pas (that linen bowstrings are unusable when wet, and arm-rings worn over chain mail), and you have a recipe for a frustrating and disappointing read.more
This is the sequel to The Last Kingdom, which I reviewed a few days ago. I had problems with that book because the protagonist, Uhtred, was an unsympathetic jerk. The historical detail was great, but I'm not too keen on reading about drinking, whores, and swordplay, even if it does play to accuracy. However, I still pressed onward with the trilogy..... and almost stopped a few chapters in. Uhtred, torn between being a Saxon by birth and a Dane in spirit, decided to masquerade as a Viking and do Viking things. Ugh. However, he did slowly mature as the book progressed. King Alfred insists that the Danes can be brought to Christ and does his utmost to promote peace. The Danes, however, do not agree. When Alfred is forced to flee and Uhtred grudgingly becomes his champion, the entire future of Wessex - and England - hang in the balance.I much preferred this book to the predecessor. This one had actual character development. I still didn't like Uhtred, but I no longer wished for his manbits to be ravaged by syphilis. Cornwell is a superb writer. His battle scenes sometimes are almost too heavy in detail, but it's interesting stuff. However, I have no gripping desire to read the next book in the trilogy. If I can find it for cheap somewhere, I'll buy it, but I'm in no rush. I won't be keeping either The Last Kingdom or The Pale Horseman.more
This book has been a wonderful continuation of the story of Uhtred and his journey to make his allegiance to King Alfred in the struggle against the Danes. I am fully enjoying this 2nd book in the Saxon chronicles series.more
Better than the first one. Still no revenge but just kept me more interested. A little repetitous with the "Fate is inexorable" thing.more
An excellent history capturing life and hardship with an accurate renditon of the relationships of the warring factions, paganism versus the new God of Rome; alas the characters suffer some as a result as does the plt which lacks a certain crispness. Still a great adventure read!more
Utred trying to save his home.... A great Read..more
Bernard Cornwell, perhaps our best writer of the historical adventure novel today, again scores high with the second book in his Saxon Stories. I'm a devoted follower of Cornwell, and in my opinion, these books rank with the better Sharpe stories and exceed The Heretic. The Pale Horseman tells the historical story of the 9th-century Danish (Norse or 'Viking') invasion and Alfred's struggle for the survival of Wessex and his idea of a united England. The Danes have already defeated Northumbria, East Anglia, and Mercia. Then the Danes broke the truce and Alfred's kingdom shrunk to an area of vast swamps and tidal flats known as the Somerset Levels. With the help of our fictional warrior, Uhtred, a man caught between loyalty and desire, Alfred rallies the fyrd - a people's army of sorts - to the great battle of Ethandun in 878 CE. Alfred's victory saved Wessex and indeed the possibility of "England" - a Danish victory and perhaps that island would be called Daneland (although had the Danes never invaded Alfred would never have had the opportunity to unite the disparate Saxon kingdoms). In any event, much remains to be done. Alas, we must await Cornwell's third installment, The Lords of the North due out in the US in January 2007. Highly recommended for fans of Cornwell or anyone who enjoys historical adventure stories. The battle descriptions put the reader right in the clash of steel, the chanting, the roaring insults, banging of shields, blood, earthy human odors, the bloodlust, the horrible injuries and brutal deaths.more
"A young man stumbled back of Osric's fyrd and vomited. Two dogs ran to eat the vomit." Gross but oh so Cornwell. He always takes the time to delineate with the minutiae of life while two armies stand off in the rain, cold and mud with the fate of a future England at stake. Cornwell has proven over and over again to be a fantastic thrilling author, with titillating combat and an array of characters that truly entrance the reader. With the second book in the Saxon series Cornwell continues to captivate. I can’t wait to read the next novel.more
In the second of this series Uhtred assumes a much more sarcastic tone when relaying the events - and his caustic judgements - to the reader. If you read the first in this series, you will note that this book continues with Uhtred's struggle to regain his lands and balancre his love of the Danes with supporting Alfred, who is still oppressive with his Christian outlook. This tension, coupled with Uhtred's roguesh amore fate, drives Uhtred from rebellious adventure back to supporting Alfred in his quest to protect England from the Danes.more
The first half of this book did not appeal, being full of slaughter and Uhtred's endless agonising over whether he remains loyal to his Saxon roots or to his acquired Danish loyalties, but rather weak on plot. The second half was better on plot, rising to an exciting ending, though I still do not like Uhtred's character.more
3rd in the series and there is probably more to come. Ends with the battle at Ethandun probably the White Horse, Bratton Camp. Cornwell tells a good story and moves it a good pace. Highly enjoyablemore
Exquisite historical detail makes The Pale Horseman come to life. The characters breathe. Very readable as a stand alone book even though it is one of a planned trilogy. This time of history, such an intense time of transition and turning points, is beautifully captured by Cornwell. I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys historical fiction.more
Load more
scribd