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An urgent cry for help brings Poirot to France. But he arrives too late to save his client, whose brutally stabbed body now lies face downwards in a shallow grave on a golf course.

But why is the dead man wearing his son's overcoat? And who was the impassioned love-letter in the pocket for? Before Poirot can answer these questions, the case is turned upside down by the discovery of a second, identically murdered corpse . . .

Topics: England, France, Private Investigators, Blackmail, Inheritance, Murder, Suspenseful, Series, 1920s, Village, 20th Century, Female Author, and British Author

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061749940
List price: $9.99
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I finished this book over lunch, and probably would've given it 3 stars until the last chapter or two. I thought the last pat of the book was intriguing, so I bumped up my rating for this one.more
I guess the reason I like reading Agatha Christie's murder mysteries so much is because I love me my unforgettable, mind-blowing endings. In every book I read. To me, if it's a story that doesn't end well (or rather, does not have a very good falling action), it's just an okay story. You have to end a story well. And Christie does it very well.

Even though the beginning was slightly dragging (which I had to understand, because the author needed to establish the mystery and the red herrings first), the ending made up for it a hundred percent. No wonder Orient Express is up there among Christie's best.

Okay, who would have thought that everyone was in on it. *Mind-fucked*
I mean, in murder mysteries, you expect that there will only be one murderer. So, yeah, I greatly appreciated Christie's different take on the murder mystery, by making all the suspects guilty of the crime.

Update: I found the 1974 movie version for this, and I'm surprised it's so star-studded. Sean Connery, Ingrid Bergman, Anthony Perkins, and I don't know any of the actors, but they do look glamorous. Already I'm thinking up my own version of a 2013 adaptation for this.

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I really give this book 3.5 stars. It's the first time I've read an Agatha Christie novel so I'm not sure if she formats her books in the same manner every time. I like how this one was formatted. It made it so the characters and evidence were presented so that I could play detective too.

It was bit slow to start, but then it took off and it was pretty good. As the mystery came to light I was thinking, "This is impossible. How can all these people be on the train at the same time and have this one connection?" I forced myself to keep on reading and then it all made sense. I thought Christie wrapped it up nicely.more
One of the most famous detective novels of all time and the first Agathie Christie novel I've read. I've come across her work before in TV shows and it was about time I read one of her books.

A well planned and executed story I had picked up bits and pieces as it went but I hadn't guessed the ending. I really enjoyed this book and if her other works are as good I can see why her works are so loved.

The only issue I had with the book was the belief that all readers are fluent in French. It annoyed me a lot (and is the reason it is only 4 stars) to be reading a sentence that suddenly has a French word in it. Or somebody be saying something, and we know they're already speaking French, and midsentence it changes language. I had to keep a translation app beside me. Overall it's a minor thing but it kept pulling me out of the story to find out what it was they said.

But I still very much look forward to reading more Agatha Christie novels in time.more
“The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.”

Il più famoso omicidio su un treno e uno dei titoli più noti con protagonista Poirot.
Il romanzo è pura indagine: c'è l'omicidio, ci sono le prove e le testimonianze e c'è una conclusione spettacolare (l'avevo già letto ma per fortuna l'avevo dimenticata).
Il lettore per molti aspetti può sfidare Poirot, anche se molti dettagli dipendono da una conoscenza della società dell'epoca.
Questi come nessun altro sono gialli di puro ragionamento ed è un piacere seguire Poirot nelle sue elucubrazioni fino alla soluzione.

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The most famous murder on a train and one of the best known adventure starring Hercule Poirot.
The novel is the investigation: there is a murder, there are evidences and there is an amazing conclusion (I had previously read this novel but luckily I forgot about it).
The reader can challenge Poirot for various deductions, however some derives from a deep knowledge of that society.
These novels are based on the pure reasoning and it's a pleasure following Poirot in his deep thinking until the solution.more
While I very much enjoyed reading this book, I have to say that I was a little disappointed by the way everything unfolded in the end. Not to say that the end was unsensational, but rather that I found it a bit too far-fetched for my liking, and whereas I found the characters believable throughout the novel, I just couldn't suspend my disbelief anymore come the lifting of the veil in the final chapters. A second reading having the information I now have may demonstrate Christie's subtlety in writing each of the characters both under their guise and within their overarching connection, but while a quick read, I won't be reading the book again anytime soon to find out.

I do still recommend this book to anyone looking for a quick and fun read, but I do not hold this novel in the high esteem that so many others seem to.more
Solidly entertaining with an ending that I did not expect. A little on the dry side. There's a lot more talking than action. Poirot and his friends spend much of their time mulling over the details of the case and interviewing subjects than getting "their hands dirty" so to speak.

But it's a very short and entertaining book. Any longer and the above criticism would have made it seem unwelcome. But I recommend it to anyone even remotely interested in mystery.more
Once again I wish Goodreads did half stars because this would definitely be getting 4.5 stars instead of just 4. I thought it was excellent- not 5 star excellent- but excellent all the same.

I am not a mystery reader in general. I've tried a few mystery books in the past and I've just never been all that interested. They just make me feel too impatient, or else they're terribly predictable. So, it certainly came as a surprise how much I enjoyed this one! Christie's writing is so intelligent and witty; I found it hard to look away and was completely drawn into the story and very intrigued by all the characters.

I think it takes great skill to write a book that takes place entirely inside one carriage on a train and to still make it entertaining and compelling. Christie created a whole little world inside that train and made it seem much more interesting than you'd think. The story itself was fascinating and I was so eager to find out who did it. The ending was not a disappointment and it was wrapped up brilliantly. I liked all the characters- they were well developed and seem very realistic. Poirot is well written and incredibly entertaining.

Overall, it was very good. A bit slow/repetitive at parts but other than that, I can't find many faults. I'm definitely looking forward to reading more by Christie and I'm delighted that she wrote so many books.
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There are some books that are "must reads" and some that are better viewed--I guess one would call them "must views." Having seen the film version of this Christie, I would indubitably say it is a "must listen."David Suchet brings all the characters to life, and the book (whether read or listened to) has so much more to offer than the movie--good though it is.Many of Christie's plots have been borrowed by other mystery writers. For all I know, Christie herself may have done a bit of borrowing herself, but however she came up with this plot, it is a wonderful one, with a completely satisfactory denuemont.more
It was fun reading the book that forged so many murder-mystery stereotypes that came after it. I was really pleasantly surprised how readable and enjoyable Agatha Christie remains so long after she first wrote it.more
'Murder on the Orient Express' by Agatha Christie was a brilliant and mysterious and suspenseful novel about Hercules Poirot investigating a murder on the Orient Express. This easy-to-read novel was extremely exciting and the scene of interrogation was especially interesting.more
I am an Agatha Christie fan. I started reading her in high school and she frequently reappears in my reading choices. However, I had never read one of her better known works until a few weeks ago. My husband is just starting to read her work, and I suggested this title, knowing that it is much loved, and decided to read it along with him.Poirot is traveling home and takes the train, the Orient Express; at the behest of an old friend, he rides in the first-class carriage. They both remark on the oddness of the full carriage, since the time of year is not usually busy, and enjoy themselves watching and speculating about the other passengers. The good times end when one of the passengers is murdered in his cabin at night, and the train is stuck in a snowdrift and no police are forthcoming. Poirot's friend, who happens to be the train conductor, urges him to help them solve the matter, so that by the time the police arrive they can present them the villain and avoid as much scandal as possible. Poirot readily agrees, and they set up an interview room in the dining car so he can speak to each passenger on the train. He also searches through the evidence in every room, with the assistance of his friend and the doctor who examined the body. Since the fun of a Christie mystery is in the gathering of clues and collecting of suspects, that's as much of the plot as I will write in this review. Of course, Poirot does figure it all out, in the end.As I suspected, I had a pleasant time reading this mystery. It has been a long while since I've read a Poirot mystery, and I missed the plucky detective. I love how everyone dismisses Poirot, unless they know his reputation. Actually, in this book they did know, and were the opposite of taking him for granted, and that was fun, too. Christie mysteries are wonderful in that she clearly presents the readers with all of the clues, and yet I still never figure them out. To be fair, she throws in a lot of red herrings, too. I read through this book quickly, and was wholly surprised by the actual killer. I understand why so many people laud the story. I am definitely ready to read some more by one of my favorite mystery writers.more
Interesting story if you enjoy crime shows or murder mysteries. Not a challenging book but entertaining, quick read.more
I have seen the movie version many times, but still I adored the book. I love the processes of Poirot. I adore the power of observation by both Hercule Poirot and Sherlock Holmes. Both men miss nothing and both men think highly of themselves. Each writer, Doyle and Christie, focuses on England, but at different times. I have not read all that each writer has completed, but I thoroughly enjoy Christie's style of writing. I feel that with Christie I am following the detective as he researches the crime. The reader sees all the clues and listens to all the stories, but only Poirot understands the outcome.more
I found a box full of old paper back copies of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express just before winter break. Since I figured they might appeal to some of my seventh graders I offered the title as a book club choice."This is the classic story about a group of strangers on a train travelling through Europe," I told each of my classes. "One night one of the passengers is found murdered, stabbed to death. Luckily, detective Hercule Poirot is on the same train. Will he find the killer before the train arrives?" I got some of the details wrong, but I also got their attention. Just over half of the book clubs (about 35 students) selected Murder on the Orient Express for the winter break reading. Since we would be writing essays about our books this time around--the last set of essays was not very good; we could use some more practice-- I decided I should probably reread the book myself. It's been many years since I last read one of Ms. Christie's classic who-dunnit's. It was a lot of fun. The story is well known, by now--a train car full of passengers in the off season gets stuck in the snow when one of the passengers is discovered stabbed to death in his cabin. Hercule Poirot must discover which of the passengers killed the man. He investigates, interrogates, investigates some more, then sits down to discuss the clues he has collected with his companions, really with the readers. The solution is revealed. Justice is more or less served. But I've no idea how we're going to write a paper about it. Usually book report essays consist of the student selecting one theme in the book and three scenes that illustrate the author's point regarding this theme. This is a useful formula that works with almost every piece of young adult fiction you can name. But I don't see it working with Murder on the Orient Express. The main thing with a response to literature essay is organizing it around a topic and selecting evidence to illustrate that topic. The problem students run into, and the one that torpedoed the last set of essays, is the temptation to simply write a long plot summery. Sounds a bit like book blogging, no? The main theme for the book is the conflict between justice and revenge. I've a problem with the author coming down so clearly on the side of revenge, but that's what she did so that's how we should write the papers. As an alternative, we may be able to write an essay describing what makes Hercule Poirot a good detective. He's got a great memory for details, he's methodical and detailed. He picks up on small things mentioned during interrogations. And, of course, he tends to select only cases with suspects willing to give complete confessions when even the slightest bit of evidence emerges. Any way you look at it, it's not going to be an easy paper to write.more
Agatha Christie is, of course, a classic mystery writer who displays all the elements of her craft in this novel. The book is laid out in neat, logical order with the murder, the clues, interviews with each of the possible suspects, and a generous sprinkling of red herrings and possibilities. Although the reader is not privy to several of Poirot's pivotal clues, Christie does an excellent job of giving the reader most of what's needed to solve the case, while not allowing things to stand out or become obvious. This is a true classic by a master author.more
My first Agatha Christie story (in any media) listened to via the BBC 4 Dramatization starring John Moffatt as Hercule Poirot and full cast (2007). First, the production is first class all the way, sounds effects, music, each person a separate voice etc.. it was like a movie. The script adaption is good enough I was able to follow the story. The clues were impossible to decipher, perhaps by design, but it became clear towards the end who the guilty party was (and there was one giant clue at the start that should have been enough to figure it out). The acting by John Moffatt was remarkable, I would listen to more of these just to hear him speak. Light fare but entertaining.more
This was my first Christie novel, and it seems like I picked one of the best! It's got a tight plot, an interesting but never tense progression, and, of course, the wry Hercule Poirot. And the way everything falls together at the end - just skillful! I really enjoyed this book, it was honestly a lot of fun.more
This is one of Christie's finest books where she creates a complex plot that hinges on a simple idea, but where the writing of the characters and setting makes it hold together. On the snowbound Orient Express, a man named Ratchett is murdered and Poirot working with the director of the company and a doctor work to figure out what happened. The joy of this story is in all the small details and how cunningly Christie puts things together and how Poirot does his reveal.more
Sometime after midnight, the Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snow drift. A few hours later the wealthy Samuel Ratchett is found dead in his room with the door locked from the inside. With no way on or off the train, the murderer must still be aboard...This is one of Christie's Hercule Poirot mysteries. Poirot is a worthy detective with an interesting way of looking at things. However, I couldn't help but feel it was impossible for me to solve this mystery myself. Maybe partly because of the time period, the setting (Europe), and the fact that Poirot seemed to jump to conclusions I never would have even thought to consider. It also probably didn't help that my mass market paperback edition didn't have any translations for the French that was used (although I don't think that hindered the understanding of the case).The evidence is laid out well: it's very neat and orderly. Which is probably why I felt Poirot was just guessing, because there's no way I could have gotten to the answer just by the evidence alone. As far as Poirot as a detective, I have to say I like Sherlock Holmes better. Poirot had his witty and cunning moments, but he lacked the debonair attitude and aloofness Holmes has.I did like the mystery itself; I found it intriguing and I was left guessing who the real murderer was until the very end. Poirot's take on justice is a bit interesting, but I won't go into it here because I don't want to give anything away. If you've read the book already, let me know in the comments what you thought about the ending.2 out of 5 stars. It was kind of meh for me. I wanted to see how it ended, and it was interesting, but I'm not sure Agatha Christie's mysteries are really for me.more
In this famous novel, Belgian Hercule Poirot is aboard the Oriental Express. While the train is snowed in in the middle of nowhere in Yugoslavia, a murder occurs. Hercule Poirot takes on the task of finding the murderer--who is obviously still stuck on the train--out of a diverse cast of passengers of all nationalities and ages, ranging from a stiff British officer to a melodramatic American woman.I have seen bits and pieces of the movies based on this book, but it has been so long since I had seen the ending, the book remained a complete surprise to me. What a joy this was! I haven't read an Agatha Christie book since I was in high school. The pace is fast and fascinating, even though the book is almost entirely dialogue. It felt so cozy; my mom loves watching Hercule Poirot mysteries, and as I read I could picture David Suchet with his little mustache. I would love to read more of Christie someday.more
If you read one Hercule Poirot novel make it this one. This was one of Christie's favorites and mine too. The story is based loosely on the real life Lindberg kidnapping case. I think knowledge of that event enhances the reading of this book. Hercule Poirot finds himself on the famed Orient Express. A murder takes place and the identity of the murder victim sheds a whole new light on the case. The conclusion is nothing short of brilliant. I did see the PBS Masterpiece version of this movie before reading this book which blunted the ending for me. I wish I had read the book first to have gotten the full impact of those last pages. This is one of my all time favorites and a highly recommended read.more
Hercule Poirot has is suddenly called back to London from Stamboul (Istanbul) and takes passage on the Orient Express. The first class section is unusually full for a winter passage with an eclectic mix of nationalities and class and a snow storm will play a major role in the case.The murder of an American, who is discovered to be traveling under a false identity, sets the stage for an 'impossible' case for Poirot--his favorite kind. The victim has been stabbed twelve times, some with tremendous force and some just barely, some obviously left-handed, others right-handed.Too many convenient clues and red herrings seem to drive the investigation, yet once Poirot sits down to silently 'think it out' and arrives at a satisfactory conclusion.more
In this Agatha Christie mystery, Belgian Detective Hercule Poirot boards the Orient Express in order to return to London for an important case. Late in the night two terrible things have occurred: the train has become stranded due to snow and one of the passengers has been murdered. Poirot must find out which one of the passengers is responsible for the murder when the evidence seems to suggest that the impossible has occurred.Murder on the Orient Express begins somewhat slowly as Christie introduces the setting and characters (future suspects). The murder occurs very early in the novel, and subsequent events are mostly a series of interviews/interrogations. While reading a series of interviews may not sound interesting, Christie is able to bring readers into the middle of the investigation so that they too are trying to determine the murderer with Poirot. The intricate plot and compelling mystery of the novel are very appealing. This classic is a must-read for fans of mystery novels.more
This was my first Agatha Christie mystery and it was a great one to start with. Hercule Poirot is aboard a train when suddenly one of the passengers is murdered. The train becomes stranded in snow making the murderers escape impossible. Poirot must search for the culprit amongst the passengers of the Orient Express. As clues are discovered suspicion is constantly switching from one passenger to another.This story will leave the reader constantly changing and reevaluating who the murderer is. The characters are engaging and interesting which was important since the bulk of the story revolves around the characters and their individual stories. I was continually guessing and trying to figure out the puzzle of the murder which made for a great mystery. Anyone who enjoys a mystery that will make you think should pick this up.more
Hercule Poirot is back, and this time he's aboard the exotic Orient Express, a passenger train traveling between India and Europe. A murder is committed, but then the train is delayed due to a snow drift, and suddenly the murderer cannot easily escape. Poirot is in his element as he rounds up an eccentric cast of suspects to question. This novel presents itself more like a word puzzle mystery game - the clues and evidence are presented in a logical matter and summed up accordingly throughout the story. Everything is pretty much laid out on the table for the reader to draw their own conclusions. I couldn't guess whodunit, but maybe you can. Personally, the real enjoyment is watching Poirot stumble upon that 'Aha!' moment and then seeing how he cleverly chooses to reveal his thinking to us.more
Agatha Christie is rightly considered the epitome of the detective novelist. She wrote over 80 novels and I've read over a dozen of them. If I had to pick one to recommend, I'd give a slight edge to the one-off, And Then There Were None, but Murder on the Orient Express, featuring her private detective Hercule Poirot, would be a close second. Like the other novel, this book features one of those Christie twists that left me slack-jawed and guaranteed I'd never forget the novel. And despite this being one of 33 novels featuring Hercule Poirot, order doesn't matter, so you don't have to read any of the seven previously published novels with him--I hadn't read any of them before reading this one, and only read two of them since. I doesn't add to anything if you do. The point of the Poirot novels isn't character development or long-term story arcs, they're about the solution of the case with Poirot playing the Great Detective a la Sherlock Holmes. There's more to this novel then just the twist though. This is a pleasure to read as Christie throws at you several memorable vividly-drawn characters in what is essentially a classic locked-room murder mystery--the killing occurred in a snow-bound train--the Orient Express. This story also holds interest as there is a thinly described allusion to a then notorious real-life crime. The film tips its hat to that angle right in the beginning--one reason I'd prefer the book is for the slower reveal.Although truly, the film does do justice to the book with a cast you could hardly match today: Albert Finney, Ingrid Bergman (who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar), Lauren Bacall, Sean Connery, Vanessa Redgrave. But read the novel first.more
I've recently crossed Australia by train AND seen the TV version of this book, so it was a good time to read it! Although a classic for it's unusual denoument and its use of the "locked room" scenario (in this case a locked sleeping compartment on a train struck in a footprint free snowdrift) it's quite contrived and the joy is again in watching Hercule Poiriot, with no outside assistance, solve the mystery using only the passengers' statements and his famous "little grey cells". Much better than the TV version (the writers seem to have an obsession with religion that is almost equal to their ignorance of that subject). Good fun and a quick read!more
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Reviews

I finished this book over lunch, and probably would've given it 3 stars until the last chapter or two. I thought the last pat of the book was intriguing, so I bumped up my rating for this one.more
I guess the reason I like reading Agatha Christie's murder mysteries so much is because I love me my unforgettable, mind-blowing endings. In every book I read. To me, if it's a story that doesn't end well (or rather, does not have a very good falling action), it's just an okay story. You have to end a story well. And Christie does it very well.

Even though the beginning was slightly dragging (which I had to understand, because the author needed to establish the mystery and the red herrings first), the ending made up for it a hundred percent. No wonder Orient Express is up there among Christie's best.

Okay, who would have thought that everyone was in on it. *Mind-fucked*
I mean, in murder mysteries, you expect that there will only be one murderer. So, yeah, I greatly appreciated Christie's different take on the murder mystery, by making all the suspects guilty of the crime.

Update: I found the 1974 movie version for this, and I'm surprised it's so star-studded. Sean Connery, Ingrid Bergman, Anthony Perkins, and I don't know any of the actors, but they do look glamorous. Already I'm thinking up my own version of a 2013 adaptation for this.

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I really give this book 3.5 stars. It's the first time I've read an Agatha Christie novel so I'm not sure if she formats her books in the same manner every time. I like how this one was formatted. It made it so the characters and evidence were presented so that I could play detective too.

It was bit slow to start, but then it took off and it was pretty good. As the mystery came to light I was thinking, "This is impossible. How can all these people be on the train at the same time and have this one connection?" I forced myself to keep on reading and then it all made sense. I thought Christie wrapped it up nicely.more
One of the most famous detective novels of all time and the first Agathie Christie novel I've read. I've come across her work before in TV shows and it was about time I read one of her books.

A well planned and executed story I had picked up bits and pieces as it went but I hadn't guessed the ending. I really enjoyed this book and if her other works are as good I can see why her works are so loved.

The only issue I had with the book was the belief that all readers are fluent in French. It annoyed me a lot (and is the reason it is only 4 stars) to be reading a sentence that suddenly has a French word in it. Or somebody be saying something, and we know they're already speaking French, and midsentence it changes language. I had to keep a translation app beside me. Overall it's a minor thing but it kept pulling me out of the story to find out what it was they said.

But I still very much look forward to reading more Agatha Christie novels in time.more
“The impossible could not have happened, therefore the impossible must be possible in spite of appearances.”

Il più famoso omicidio su un treno e uno dei titoli più noti con protagonista Poirot.
Il romanzo è pura indagine: c'è l'omicidio, ci sono le prove e le testimonianze e c'è una conclusione spettacolare (l'avevo già letto ma per fortuna l'avevo dimenticata).
Il lettore per molti aspetti può sfidare Poirot, anche se molti dettagli dipendono da una conoscenza della società dell'epoca.
Questi come nessun altro sono gialli di puro ragionamento ed è un piacere seguire Poirot nelle sue elucubrazioni fino alla soluzione.

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The most famous murder on a train and one of the best known adventure starring Hercule Poirot.
The novel is the investigation: there is a murder, there are evidences and there is an amazing conclusion (I had previously read this novel but luckily I forgot about it).
The reader can challenge Poirot for various deductions, however some derives from a deep knowledge of that society.
These novels are based on the pure reasoning and it's a pleasure following Poirot in his deep thinking until the solution.more
While I very much enjoyed reading this book, I have to say that I was a little disappointed by the way everything unfolded in the end. Not to say that the end was unsensational, but rather that I found it a bit too far-fetched for my liking, and whereas I found the characters believable throughout the novel, I just couldn't suspend my disbelief anymore come the lifting of the veil in the final chapters. A second reading having the information I now have may demonstrate Christie's subtlety in writing each of the characters both under their guise and within their overarching connection, but while a quick read, I won't be reading the book again anytime soon to find out.

I do still recommend this book to anyone looking for a quick and fun read, but I do not hold this novel in the high esteem that so many others seem to.more
Solidly entertaining with an ending that I did not expect. A little on the dry side. There's a lot more talking than action. Poirot and his friends spend much of their time mulling over the details of the case and interviewing subjects than getting "their hands dirty" so to speak.

But it's a very short and entertaining book. Any longer and the above criticism would have made it seem unwelcome. But I recommend it to anyone even remotely interested in mystery.more
Once again I wish Goodreads did half stars because this would definitely be getting 4.5 stars instead of just 4. I thought it was excellent- not 5 star excellent- but excellent all the same.

I am not a mystery reader in general. I've tried a few mystery books in the past and I've just never been all that interested. They just make me feel too impatient, or else they're terribly predictable. So, it certainly came as a surprise how much I enjoyed this one! Christie's writing is so intelligent and witty; I found it hard to look away and was completely drawn into the story and very intrigued by all the characters.

I think it takes great skill to write a book that takes place entirely inside one carriage on a train and to still make it entertaining and compelling. Christie created a whole little world inside that train and made it seem much more interesting than you'd think. The story itself was fascinating and I was so eager to find out who did it. The ending was not a disappointment and it was wrapped up brilliantly. I liked all the characters- they were well developed and seem very realistic. Poirot is well written and incredibly entertaining.

Overall, it was very good. A bit slow/repetitive at parts but other than that, I can't find many faults. I'm definitely looking forward to reading more by Christie and I'm delighted that she wrote so many books.
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There are some books that are "must reads" and some that are better viewed--I guess one would call them "must views." Having seen the film version of this Christie, I would indubitably say it is a "must listen."David Suchet brings all the characters to life, and the book (whether read or listened to) has so much more to offer than the movie--good though it is.Many of Christie's plots have been borrowed by other mystery writers. For all I know, Christie herself may have done a bit of borrowing herself, but however she came up with this plot, it is a wonderful one, with a completely satisfactory denuemont.more
It was fun reading the book that forged so many murder-mystery stereotypes that came after it. I was really pleasantly surprised how readable and enjoyable Agatha Christie remains so long after she first wrote it.more
'Murder on the Orient Express' by Agatha Christie was a brilliant and mysterious and suspenseful novel about Hercules Poirot investigating a murder on the Orient Express. This easy-to-read novel was extremely exciting and the scene of interrogation was especially interesting.more
I am an Agatha Christie fan. I started reading her in high school and she frequently reappears in my reading choices. However, I had never read one of her better known works until a few weeks ago. My husband is just starting to read her work, and I suggested this title, knowing that it is much loved, and decided to read it along with him.Poirot is traveling home and takes the train, the Orient Express; at the behest of an old friend, he rides in the first-class carriage. They both remark on the oddness of the full carriage, since the time of year is not usually busy, and enjoy themselves watching and speculating about the other passengers. The good times end when one of the passengers is murdered in his cabin at night, and the train is stuck in a snowdrift and no police are forthcoming. Poirot's friend, who happens to be the train conductor, urges him to help them solve the matter, so that by the time the police arrive they can present them the villain and avoid as much scandal as possible. Poirot readily agrees, and they set up an interview room in the dining car so he can speak to each passenger on the train. He also searches through the evidence in every room, with the assistance of his friend and the doctor who examined the body. Since the fun of a Christie mystery is in the gathering of clues and collecting of suspects, that's as much of the plot as I will write in this review. Of course, Poirot does figure it all out, in the end.As I suspected, I had a pleasant time reading this mystery. It has been a long while since I've read a Poirot mystery, and I missed the plucky detective. I love how everyone dismisses Poirot, unless they know his reputation. Actually, in this book they did know, and were the opposite of taking him for granted, and that was fun, too. Christie mysteries are wonderful in that she clearly presents the readers with all of the clues, and yet I still never figure them out. To be fair, she throws in a lot of red herrings, too. I read through this book quickly, and was wholly surprised by the actual killer. I understand why so many people laud the story. I am definitely ready to read some more by one of my favorite mystery writers.more
Interesting story if you enjoy crime shows or murder mysteries. Not a challenging book but entertaining, quick read.more
I have seen the movie version many times, but still I adored the book. I love the processes of Poirot. I adore the power of observation by both Hercule Poirot and Sherlock Holmes. Both men miss nothing and both men think highly of themselves. Each writer, Doyle and Christie, focuses on England, but at different times. I have not read all that each writer has completed, but I thoroughly enjoy Christie's style of writing. I feel that with Christie I am following the detective as he researches the crime. The reader sees all the clues and listens to all the stories, but only Poirot understands the outcome.more
I found a box full of old paper back copies of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express just before winter break. Since I figured they might appeal to some of my seventh graders I offered the title as a book club choice."This is the classic story about a group of strangers on a train travelling through Europe," I told each of my classes. "One night one of the passengers is found murdered, stabbed to death. Luckily, detective Hercule Poirot is on the same train. Will he find the killer before the train arrives?" I got some of the details wrong, but I also got their attention. Just over half of the book clubs (about 35 students) selected Murder on the Orient Express for the winter break reading. Since we would be writing essays about our books this time around--the last set of essays was not very good; we could use some more practice-- I decided I should probably reread the book myself. It's been many years since I last read one of Ms. Christie's classic who-dunnit's. It was a lot of fun. The story is well known, by now--a train car full of passengers in the off season gets stuck in the snow when one of the passengers is discovered stabbed to death in his cabin. Hercule Poirot must discover which of the passengers killed the man. He investigates, interrogates, investigates some more, then sits down to discuss the clues he has collected with his companions, really with the readers. The solution is revealed. Justice is more or less served. But I've no idea how we're going to write a paper about it. Usually book report essays consist of the student selecting one theme in the book and three scenes that illustrate the author's point regarding this theme. This is a useful formula that works with almost every piece of young adult fiction you can name. But I don't see it working with Murder on the Orient Express. The main thing with a response to literature essay is organizing it around a topic and selecting evidence to illustrate that topic. The problem students run into, and the one that torpedoed the last set of essays, is the temptation to simply write a long plot summery. Sounds a bit like book blogging, no? The main theme for the book is the conflict between justice and revenge. I've a problem with the author coming down so clearly on the side of revenge, but that's what she did so that's how we should write the papers. As an alternative, we may be able to write an essay describing what makes Hercule Poirot a good detective. He's got a great memory for details, he's methodical and detailed. He picks up on small things mentioned during interrogations. And, of course, he tends to select only cases with suspects willing to give complete confessions when even the slightest bit of evidence emerges. Any way you look at it, it's not going to be an easy paper to write.more
Agatha Christie is, of course, a classic mystery writer who displays all the elements of her craft in this novel. The book is laid out in neat, logical order with the murder, the clues, interviews with each of the possible suspects, and a generous sprinkling of red herrings and possibilities. Although the reader is not privy to several of Poirot's pivotal clues, Christie does an excellent job of giving the reader most of what's needed to solve the case, while not allowing things to stand out or become obvious. This is a true classic by a master author.more
My first Agatha Christie story (in any media) listened to via the BBC 4 Dramatization starring John Moffatt as Hercule Poirot and full cast (2007). First, the production is first class all the way, sounds effects, music, each person a separate voice etc.. it was like a movie. The script adaption is good enough I was able to follow the story. The clues were impossible to decipher, perhaps by design, but it became clear towards the end who the guilty party was (and there was one giant clue at the start that should have been enough to figure it out). The acting by John Moffatt was remarkable, I would listen to more of these just to hear him speak. Light fare but entertaining.more
This was my first Christie novel, and it seems like I picked one of the best! It's got a tight plot, an interesting but never tense progression, and, of course, the wry Hercule Poirot. And the way everything falls together at the end - just skillful! I really enjoyed this book, it was honestly a lot of fun.more
This is one of Christie's finest books where she creates a complex plot that hinges on a simple idea, but where the writing of the characters and setting makes it hold together. On the snowbound Orient Express, a man named Ratchett is murdered and Poirot working with the director of the company and a doctor work to figure out what happened. The joy of this story is in all the small details and how cunningly Christie puts things together and how Poirot does his reveal.more
Sometime after midnight, the Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snow drift. A few hours later the wealthy Samuel Ratchett is found dead in his room with the door locked from the inside. With no way on or off the train, the murderer must still be aboard...This is one of Christie's Hercule Poirot mysteries. Poirot is a worthy detective with an interesting way of looking at things. However, I couldn't help but feel it was impossible for me to solve this mystery myself. Maybe partly because of the time period, the setting (Europe), and the fact that Poirot seemed to jump to conclusions I never would have even thought to consider. It also probably didn't help that my mass market paperback edition didn't have any translations for the French that was used (although I don't think that hindered the understanding of the case).The evidence is laid out well: it's very neat and orderly. Which is probably why I felt Poirot was just guessing, because there's no way I could have gotten to the answer just by the evidence alone. As far as Poirot as a detective, I have to say I like Sherlock Holmes better. Poirot had his witty and cunning moments, but he lacked the debonair attitude and aloofness Holmes has.I did like the mystery itself; I found it intriguing and I was left guessing who the real murderer was until the very end. Poirot's take on justice is a bit interesting, but I won't go into it here because I don't want to give anything away. If you've read the book already, let me know in the comments what you thought about the ending.2 out of 5 stars. It was kind of meh for me. I wanted to see how it ended, and it was interesting, but I'm not sure Agatha Christie's mysteries are really for me.more
In this famous novel, Belgian Hercule Poirot is aboard the Oriental Express. While the train is snowed in in the middle of nowhere in Yugoslavia, a murder occurs. Hercule Poirot takes on the task of finding the murderer--who is obviously still stuck on the train--out of a diverse cast of passengers of all nationalities and ages, ranging from a stiff British officer to a melodramatic American woman.I have seen bits and pieces of the movies based on this book, but it has been so long since I had seen the ending, the book remained a complete surprise to me. What a joy this was! I haven't read an Agatha Christie book since I was in high school. The pace is fast and fascinating, even though the book is almost entirely dialogue. It felt so cozy; my mom loves watching Hercule Poirot mysteries, and as I read I could picture David Suchet with his little mustache. I would love to read more of Christie someday.more
If you read one Hercule Poirot novel make it this one. This was one of Christie's favorites and mine too. The story is based loosely on the real life Lindberg kidnapping case. I think knowledge of that event enhances the reading of this book. Hercule Poirot finds himself on the famed Orient Express. A murder takes place and the identity of the murder victim sheds a whole new light on the case. The conclusion is nothing short of brilliant. I did see the PBS Masterpiece version of this movie before reading this book which blunted the ending for me. I wish I had read the book first to have gotten the full impact of those last pages. This is one of my all time favorites and a highly recommended read.more
Hercule Poirot has is suddenly called back to London from Stamboul (Istanbul) and takes passage on the Orient Express. The first class section is unusually full for a winter passage with an eclectic mix of nationalities and class and a snow storm will play a major role in the case.The murder of an American, who is discovered to be traveling under a false identity, sets the stage for an 'impossible' case for Poirot--his favorite kind. The victim has been stabbed twelve times, some with tremendous force and some just barely, some obviously left-handed, others right-handed.Too many convenient clues and red herrings seem to drive the investigation, yet once Poirot sits down to silently 'think it out' and arrives at a satisfactory conclusion.more
In this Agatha Christie mystery, Belgian Detective Hercule Poirot boards the Orient Express in order to return to London for an important case. Late in the night two terrible things have occurred: the train has become stranded due to snow and one of the passengers has been murdered. Poirot must find out which one of the passengers is responsible for the murder when the evidence seems to suggest that the impossible has occurred.Murder on the Orient Express begins somewhat slowly as Christie introduces the setting and characters (future suspects). The murder occurs very early in the novel, and subsequent events are mostly a series of interviews/interrogations. While reading a series of interviews may not sound interesting, Christie is able to bring readers into the middle of the investigation so that they too are trying to determine the murderer with Poirot. The intricate plot and compelling mystery of the novel are very appealing. This classic is a must-read for fans of mystery novels.more
This was my first Agatha Christie mystery and it was a great one to start with. Hercule Poirot is aboard a train when suddenly one of the passengers is murdered. The train becomes stranded in snow making the murderers escape impossible. Poirot must search for the culprit amongst the passengers of the Orient Express. As clues are discovered suspicion is constantly switching from one passenger to another.This story will leave the reader constantly changing and reevaluating who the murderer is. The characters are engaging and interesting which was important since the bulk of the story revolves around the characters and their individual stories. I was continually guessing and trying to figure out the puzzle of the murder which made for a great mystery. Anyone who enjoys a mystery that will make you think should pick this up.more
Hercule Poirot is back, and this time he's aboard the exotic Orient Express, a passenger train traveling between India and Europe. A murder is committed, but then the train is delayed due to a snow drift, and suddenly the murderer cannot easily escape. Poirot is in his element as he rounds up an eccentric cast of suspects to question. This novel presents itself more like a word puzzle mystery game - the clues and evidence are presented in a logical matter and summed up accordingly throughout the story. Everything is pretty much laid out on the table for the reader to draw their own conclusions. I couldn't guess whodunit, but maybe you can. Personally, the real enjoyment is watching Poirot stumble upon that 'Aha!' moment and then seeing how he cleverly chooses to reveal his thinking to us.more
Agatha Christie is rightly considered the epitome of the detective novelist. She wrote over 80 novels and I've read over a dozen of them. If I had to pick one to recommend, I'd give a slight edge to the one-off, And Then There Were None, but Murder on the Orient Express, featuring her private detective Hercule Poirot, would be a close second. Like the other novel, this book features one of those Christie twists that left me slack-jawed and guaranteed I'd never forget the novel. And despite this being one of 33 novels featuring Hercule Poirot, order doesn't matter, so you don't have to read any of the seven previously published novels with him--I hadn't read any of them before reading this one, and only read two of them since. I doesn't add to anything if you do. The point of the Poirot novels isn't character development or long-term story arcs, they're about the solution of the case with Poirot playing the Great Detective a la Sherlock Holmes. There's more to this novel then just the twist though. This is a pleasure to read as Christie throws at you several memorable vividly-drawn characters in what is essentially a classic locked-room murder mystery--the killing occurred in a snow-bound train--the Orient Express. This story also holds interest as there is a thinly described allusion to a then notorious real-life crime. The film tips its hat to that angle right in the beginning--one reason I'd prefer the book is for the slower reveal.Although truly, the film does do justice to the book with a cast you could hardly match today: Albert Finney, Ingrid Bergman (who won a Best Supporting Actress Oscar), Lauren Bacall, Sean Connery, Vanessa Redgrave. But read the novel first.more
I've recently crossed Australia by train AND seen the TV version of this book, so it was a good time to read it! Although a classic for it's unusual denoument and its use of the "locked room" scenario (in this case a locked sleeping compartment on a train struck in a footprint free snowdrift) it's quite contrived and the joy is again in watching Hercule Poiriot, with no outside assistance, solve the mystery using only the passengers' statements and his famous "little grey cells". Much better than the TV version (the writers seem to have an obsession with religion that is almost equal to their ignorance of that subject). Good fun and a quick read!more
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