Reader reviews for A Lonely Death: An Inspector Ian Rutledge Mystery

Ian Rutledge must go to a Sussex village to investigate several deaths of men who served in WWI. The Todds provide many undercurrents such as an old case for a retiring chief inspector, Ian's hopes of love and promotion, and childhood pranks. Ex soldiers are being garroted by a lone killer, and the police cannot find the killer. When a fellow policeman is almost killed, Ian is arrested and spends time in jail. But Ian's problems are not only the murders. Ian loses two friends: one to suicide and one to an early death. The mother and son team do a superb job with characters and setting.
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I liked the setting (small town England shortly after WW1), but this was a little bit too procedural for my taste. It seemed to plod along at times. Of its kind, I think it was quite decent, but this isn't my favorite kind of mystery.
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A Lonely Death is the 13th Inspector Ian Rutledge book put out by the mother and son author team Charles Todd. I had heard about Rutledge before but this was the first one I’ve been able to read and I have to say I wish I had started sooner! It took me a little while to get into this one because I had no idea who Rutledge was or anything else about him, but by the 4th chapter I was hooked. I think the authors did a good job of balancing cluing in a new reader vs. boring a fan with repetitive back story. Not all series writers do that well. I think this was an excellent mystery/thriller and I highly recommend it.In a sleepy little town of Eastfield near Hastings where nothing has happened since Henry VIII, 3 men who survived the Great War were garroted and an identity disk is left in their mouths. When the son of an influential business man becomes one of the victims, Scotland Yard is called in. It appears someone is exacting revenge for some past wrong, but what that wrong is and who could harbor such hate has everyone baffled and worried.While Rutledge is running around southern England interviewing the men whose names where on the tags a woman in Eastfield had a complaint about his behavior so when he arrived back to continue his investigation he finds he’s been replaced and told to go back to London. Ian is pretty sure the recall is more political maneuvering to ruin his chances of promotion and less to do with the actual complaint. More smoke clouds the issue as more attacks occur and Ian takes matters into his own hands to find the murderer, and clear his own reputation.
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I love a mystery that I cannot guess that outcome before I get through half of a book. This one kept me in complete suspense. Like that you are able to read that the main character also has a personal life, that he is not all work. It read like a 21st century novel until you read that they are crank starting cars and the limitations of telephones. I really enjoyed the book. Will have to go back and read earlier ones.
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This is the usual good story about Inspector Rutledge.If you are a fan of the series, you'll enjoy it.However, the authors have included an incident which relies on a very large coincidence. I found it not only implausible, but unnecessary to the novel. It bothers me - the reason for only 3 stars.
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In a peaceful country village, someone is strangling ex-soldiers and leaving identity disks in their mouths. Inspector Rutledge, still shell-shocked from his time in the trenches, is sent to investigate. As always, there are complications.Typical of the series.
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Not my favorite of the authors' books - I'm liking the series about the nurse more. I'm getting a little tired of Ian Rutledge's inability or unwillingness to come to terms with his shell-shock and war guilt. He could certainly use a consultation with Maisie Dobbs! However, the things I do like about the series are still there and will probably keep me reading it a while longer.
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This isn't my usual genre, as I'm not a big fan of police drama, mysteries, or historical fiction. This story is about a Scotland Yard police inspector, trying to solve a murder mystery, shortly after WWI. Not my usual, but still an interesting, well written story that I'm glad I read.Inspector Ian Rutledge works for Scotland Yard, and seems to have a slight problem with authority. Despite being good at his job, I got the impression that he didn't indulge in office politics or 'play the game' in order to get ahead. Reminded me a little bit of John Rebus, but they inhabit different worlds.Because of the time period, this struck me as more of a gentle read. There were cars and phones, but the cars had to be hand cranked and there was only one phone in the entire village where the murders took place. Every reminder of the time period sort of took me by surprise, as I'm not used to stories set in the past. Every now and again I'd wonder why he didn't just call such-and-such on his cell. Well, duh! Makes me think I either need to pay better attention or read more historical fiction!This was a good, old-fashioned story where the crime had to be solved without all of the modern CSI advantages. I liked Inspector Rutledge, but the mystery didn't really grab me and I was more interested in the characters than finding out the whodunnit. Gave it a 3/5 as I liked it, but didn't love it. Think mystery lovers would enjoy this more than I did, and most of the reviews I've seen have given it 4/5 and 5/5 ratings.
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I received this book as part of the Early Reviewers program.I have been following the adventures of Inspector Ian Rutledge since the beginning of the series. This book, like the rest of the series, takes place in the years following the Great War. Todd weaves the stories of those who fought and died in that war into the entire series. In fact, Inspector Rutledge lives with the voice of one of his men in his mind. The voice of Hamish is still important, but I have watched it diminish over the course of the books, as I think it should, because the war continues to move further into the past and those who survived become less consumed by the events of the war. That being said, "A Lonely Death" deals directly and indirectly with the aftermath of the war in its plot--a series of murders in Sussex of men who served together in the war, each found with the identity disc (dog tag) of a different soldier stuffed into his mouth. At the same time there is another murder mystery playing out in the background, a cold case that belonged to Rutledge's friend and mentor at the Yard. Todd weaves this second murder into the story well enough, but I found the conclusion to be a bit contrived and disappointing. At the same time, the twists and turns of the primary storyline is what I expect from Charles Todd. I would recommend this book (or the entire series)to anyone who enjoys British murder mysteries, the inter-war period in England, or just a good page turner. I look forward to continue reading about Inspector Rutledge and the personal/interpersonal issues he has to deal with while attempting to solve tough cases for Scotland Yard.
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This is a perfectly reasonable book that I just couldn't get into. I've always liked PD James' books with their village sort of crimes, but in general I don't like these kinds of books all that much. This is not the fault of this book (which is definitely well-written), just a mismatch between reader and author.
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