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As America and the Soviet Union race to build their nuclear stockpiles, two extraordinary heroes must form an uneasy alliance. These studies in opposites—shadow and light—must overcome their distrust of each other to battle evil and injustice.

Sputnik silently circles in the skies above the fabled cities of the United States as danger lurks in the Earth's darkest corners.

In Gotham, the shadowy vigilante known as the Batman haunts Gotham's streets . . . and the police are just as afraid of this Dark Knight as the city's criminals are.

In Metropolis, the notorious Lex Luthor is leveraging international tensions to build LuthorCorp into a military-industrial empire, competing against his business rival Wayne Industries, which is run by Gotham's enigmatic millionaire, Bruce Wayne. Luthor's activities have raised the interest of Daily Planet reporter Lois Lane, who is beginning to realize that Luthor may stop at nothing to achieve success.

At the same time, Clark Kent and Jimmy Olsen are investigating the rumored crash of a flying saucer. Clark is desperate to know if there may be other lost interplanetary visitors on Earth secretly living among them—visitors like himself.

When Batman's and Superman's paths cross, their lives change, and history will never be the same.

Published: HarperCollins on May 5, 2009
ISBN: 9780061915598
List price: $3.99
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For the guy/gal who's into either one of these superheroes this is a great read! read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Kevin J. Anderson tends to spend a lot of time in other peoples worlds, from Dune to Star Wars. Recently he has taken a stab at the world of DC Comics - first with ‘The Last Days of Krypton‘, and now with a story about the first meeting between Superman and Batman. Anyone who knows these characters well understands that their approach to crime fighting is very different. And ‘Enemies & Allies‘ does a pretty good job showing the opposing views of these two super heroes.

Set in a more nostalgic setting of the 1950’s, this story remains faithful to the characters as they were depicted during that era of comic books. It’s classic space ships, kryptonite, communist generals and Lex Luthor at his finest worst.

I truly enjoyed the chance to spend some time back in a classic comic book setting. The writing style is easy to read and makes this a book to spend some relaxing fun time with. This isn’t the type of book that will have you thinking to hard, but it was just too much of a childhood super hero zone out to put down. I found myself finding every free moment reading it.

If your a DC Comics super hero fan, you will thoroughly enjoy this book. I can’t wait to share this with my kids someday.

read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Note: This review is based on an Advance Reader's Edition copy sent by the publisher.'Enemies and Allies' was a fun, easy read. Kevin Anderson has captured the feel and tropes of the 1950s (Commies and Aliens galore!) as well as the spirit of the 'World's Finest' comics from the same era.In keeping with its comic book origins, the plot is simple but engaging while the prose format allows Anderson to flesh out the characters in ways those silver age teamups never could. While he may, perhaps, spend a bit too much time providing background and basic characterization for characters who are already American cultural icons, those scenes (and some of the associated 1950's and comic book name checks) are fun and about the time they begin to get tiresome, the plot picks up tremendously.Adding to the enjoyment is the simple fact that both Batman and Superman come across as well characterized. There are no jarring moments for either and their initial distrust of the other hero's motivation and methods was handled well and made their eventual teamup that much stronger.I definitely recommend 'Enemies and Allies' to anybody who enjoys the characters and is looking for a light and lighthearted escape.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

For the guy/gal who's into either one of these superheroes this is a great read!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Kevin J. Anderson tends to spend a lot of time in other peoples worlds, from Dune to Star Wars. Recently he has taken a stab at the world of DC Comics - first with ‘The Last Days of Krypton‘, and now with a story about the first meeting between Superman and Batman. Anyone who knows these characters well understands that their approach to crime fighting is very different. And ‘Enemies & Allies‘ does a pretty good job showing the opposing views of these two super heroes.

Set in a more nostalgic setting of the 1950’s, this story remains faithful to the characters as they were depicted during that era of comic books. It’s classic space ships, kryptonite, communist generals and Lex Luthor at his finest worst.

I truly enjoyed the chance to spend some time back in a classic comic book setting. The writing style is easy to read and makes this a book to spend some relaxing fun time with. This isn’t the type of book that will have you thinking to hard, but it was just too much of a childhood super hero zone out to put down. I found myself finding every free moment reading it.

If your a DC Comics super hero fan, you will thoroughly enjoy this book. I can’t wait to share this with my kids someday.

Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Note: This review is based on an Advance Reader's Edition copy sent by the publisher.'Enemies and Allies' was a fun, easy read. Kevin Anderson has captured the feel and tropes of the 1950s (Commies and Aliens galore!) as well as the spirit of the 'World's Finest' comics from the same era.In keeping with its comic book origins, the plot is simple but engaging while the prose format allows Anderson to flesh out the characters in ways those silver age teamups never could. While he may, perhaps, spend a bit too much time providing background and basic characterization for characters who are already American cultural icons, those scenes (and some of the associated 1950's and comic book name checks) are fun and about the time they begin to get tiresome, the plot picks up tremendously.Adding to the enjoyment is the simple fact that both Batman and Superman come across as well characterized. There are no jarring moments for either and their initial distrust of the other hero's motivation and methods was handled well and made their eventual teamup that much stronger.I definitely recommend 'Enemies and Allies' to anybody who enjoys the characters and is looking for a light and lighthearted escape.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Kevin J. Anderson brings readers a fun and exciting read with Enemies and Allies. This book takes and incorporates two of the best superheroes and pits them together to fight a mutual enemy...Lex Luther. Lex Luther is constructing a nuclear reactor that could destroy the world. It seems that while building this reactor that he has discovered Superman's weakness to Kryptonite. The funny thing is that Lex doesn't know he possess in his hands the very thing that could bring down Superman. Lex Luther's plans though do not go un-noticed. In fact his plan to make LuthorCor the number one company has raised red flags with LuthorCor's rival competitor...Wayne Industries. Multi-millionaire playboy Bruce Wayne does not like with Lex is up to and decides to take matters into his own hands as Batman. Batman gets a helping hand when he and Superman team up to take on the bad guys in Enemies and Allies. I have to admit that I love all the great superheroes of the past. I grew up during a time when as a children you lived for Saturday mornings for the cartoons. So for me I was very excited to pick up a copy of this book to read. While I did enjoy reading Enemies and Allies, I was surprised to discover that the story took place at the beginning. A time when Clark Kent was just learning about his powers and who he really is and where he came from. So because of this aspect, I felt that Batman was more superior then Superman. Of course I still won't want to be Lex as he takes both of these heroes on. Talk about a major handicap match. Though so of the events that took place in the story were not accurate, Mr. Anderson stayed pretty true to the men behind the capes. So after all the dust has settled and the good guys end up on top, all I have to say is give me more.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A novel of Superman and Batman's first meeting, set in the late 1950's. Superman and Batman have both recently revealed themselves to the world. Superman is seen as a hero, while Batman is a wanted criminal in Gotham City. The two of them meet as they both become aware of the plotting of Lex Luthor and a Soviet general to take over the world through a variety of schemes starting with the accidental launch of some Soviet missiles.I was not impressed with this book. The 1950's setting for the origin of these characters was interesting, but that was about it. The first third of the book is largely taken up with repeating the basic backstory of the characters that almost anyone would already know by now and doesn't really add anything new to those. The writing is very basic and feels more like a YA book. None of the characters seemed to come alive, especially the supporting ones such as Lois Lane and Jimmy Olson who are just one-dimensional place holders. The simple, flat writing is not enough to make up for the visual aspect that is present in superhero comics or movies and I could just never get involved in the story. I don't see the purpose in writing a text novel about the characters if it is not going to be used to develop a deeper story than is found in the movies or graphic novels.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Media tie ins can be good, bad, or okay. This one bordered between good and okay.Basically what Anderson wrote was a novel length story much like those that were in the comic books around when Superman debuted.It's set during the Cold War, around the time that Joe McCarthy was persecuting people, Khrushchev banging his shoe and Sputnik was still up in the sky, all he did was add in the fact that Superman can pluck boats from the water and Batman is skulking around a Gotham City that's a separate city from New York, New York (I think).They're both at the relative beginnings of their careers when the story begins. Anderson does a pretty good job of balancing out the Bruce Wayne versus Batman and Clark Kent versus Superman parts of their characters. A lot of writers (in TV, the comics, movies or novels) tend to pick one or the other of the guys identities and stick with that one as the 'real' one, when it should generally be written in a much more sophisticated way than that. Anderson doesn't take that easy way out.I also like that he takes parts of the restart movies of both franchises and uses the best parts of them here and there throughout the book (I could so see a scene like the one in Martha and Thomas Wayne park taking place in a current Batman movie).All in all a good solid book. Maybe there will even been a sequel or something. (Oh, and a reference to Oliver Queen, almost gave the book a fourth star just for that).
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