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Here, in this compelling assembly of writings, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Annie Dillard explores the world of natural facts and human meanings.

Topics: Essays, Creative Nonfiction, Inspirational, Philosophical, Writing, Spirituality , The Environment, Journeys, and Transcendentalism

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061843174
List price: $5.99
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All of her writing is so rich and deep. Similar to the way I feel about Buechner's writing, I could re-read it hundreds of times and get someting different out of it every time. This is my favorite of what I've read of hers so far, probbaly because I like the short essay style of these chapters and can finish them faster than her other books which take me longer to digest.read more
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This is the first Annie Dillard book I've ever read, and I found it quite deserving of my time. Being a collection of short stories, it's naturally difficult to sum the book up in a review. Expeditions and Encounters is probably about as appropriate a summation as can be provided.There are two stories in particular that have made themselves most comfortable among the familiar furniture of my mind: "An Expedition to the Pole" and "Total Eclipse". I won't attempt to sketch either of these, as any attempt short of simply copying and pasting the essays in their entirety would be inadequate. I would like to provide this one quote, however, from "Total Eclipse":All those things for which we have no words are lost. The mind—the culture—has two little tools, grammar and lexicon: a decorated sand bucket and a matching shovel. With these we bluster about the continents and do all the world's work. With these we try to save our very lives.Taken out of context, that passage loses a lot of significance, but it still holds some water. The book's full of stuff like that, and I very much look forward to reading Dillard's other works.read more
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'Expeditions and Encounters'read more
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All of her writing is so rich and deep. Similar to the way I feel about Buechner's writing, I could re-read it hundreds of times and get someting different out of it every time. This is my favorite of what I've read of hers so far, probbaly because I like the short essay style of these chapters and can finish them faster than her other books which take me longer to digest.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is the first Annie Dillard book I've ever read, and I found it quite deserving of my time. Being a collection of short stories, it's naturally difficult to sum the book up in a review. Expeditions and Encounters is probably about as appropriate a summation as can be provided.There are two stories in particular that have made themselves most comfortable among the familiar furniture of my mind: "An Expedition to the Pole" and "Total Eclipse". I won't attempt to sketch either of these, as any attempt short of simply copying and pasting the essays in their entirety would be inadequate. I would like to provide this one quote, however, from "Total Eclipse":All those things for which we have no words are lost. The mind—the culture—has two little tools, grammar and lexicon: a decorated sand bucket and a matching shovel. With these we bluster about the continents and do all the world's work. With these we try to save our very lives.Taken out of context, that passage loses a lot of significance, but it still holds some water. The book's full of stuff like that, and I very much look forward to reading Dillard's other works.
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'Expeditions and Encounters'
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While I did not enjoy this nearly as much as Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, this makes me feel so blessed and honored to have ever heard of her in the first place. She manages to observe life in a way that makes you want to slow down and see what's happening rather than have it blow past. She forces you to stop and see the great spectacle that is always before. She forces you to be still and just breathe. She also is able to wrap up a book better than most other non-fiction authors.
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In a lot of ways, Dillard taught me to see. She gave me tools I use every day, and hope to use for every day I have left. Her prose is full of awe and wonder and reverence. This is my favorite of all her books.
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