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This is a book about young men who learned to play baseball during the 1930s and 1940s, and then went on to play for one of the most exciting major-league ball clubs ever fielded, the team that broke the color barrier with Jackie Robinson. It is a book by and about a sportswriter who grew up near Ebbets Field, and who had the good fortune in the 1950s to cover the Dodgers for the Herald Tribune. This is a book about what happened to Jackie, Carl Erskine, Pee Wee Reese, and the others when their glory days were behind them. In short, it is a book about America, about fathers and sons, prejudice and courage, triumph and disaster, and told with warmth, humor, wit, candor, and love.

Published: HarperCollins on Feb 22, 2011
ISBN: 9780062089984
List price: $8.99
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Really three books in one. The first - what it was like to grow up a Jewish baseball fan in Brooklyn in the 30's and 40's. I enjoyed reading this much more than I had expected. The second - what it was like to cover the Dodgers during their Brooklyn heydey of 1952-53 as a reporter for the New York Herald Tribune. This section is what brought me to read the book and it only disappointed due to its brevity - but the writing is fantastic. The third section - what happened to all those old great ballplayers twenty years after the glory days. This section is the longest and what really sets the book apart from other baseball writing. Amazing what these guys had to go through after their careers were over - imagine Carl Furillo working as an Otis Elevator installer during the construction of the World Trade Center. Boggles the mind. These ballplayers had fought World War II, played in the World Series, and lived full lives after their playing days were done, and I'm glad I got to know them a little bit. Thanks, Mr.Kahn.read more
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This book is called a classic by many, and I agree it is a fantasticly written book, but I'm not sure I would rank it amongst the best baseball books. Kahn tells his life story as it happened with the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Dodgers always the bridesmaid never the bride taught him many lessons as he grew up with the team. It is a great picture of a time in America when the team and its town were so interwoven in a way that is impossible today. The Dodgers were a part of Brooklyn more than a lot of other teams and cities, this book is a great memory of that relationship.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a classic book, and I suppose deservedly so, but I have to admit to being somewhat disappointed. Maybe because of the central role played by Kahn himself here. But I suppose Kahn was building a model that was later to be refined. See "The Last Good Season" for a later model.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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Reviews

Really three books in one. The first - what it was like to grow up a Jewish baseball fan in Brooklyn in the 30's and 40's. I enjoyed reading this much more than I had expected. The second - what it was like to cover the Dodgers during their Brooklyn heydey of 1952-53 as a reporter for the New York Herald Tribune. This section is what brought me to read the book and it only disappointed due to its brevity - but the writing is fantastic. The third section - what happened to all those old great ballplayers twenty years after the glory days. This section is the longest and what really sets the book apart from other baseball writing. Amazing what these guys had to go through after their careers were over - imagine Carl Furillo working as an Otis Elevator installer during the construction of the World Trade Center. Boggles the mind. These ballplayers had fought World War II, played in the World Series, and lived full lives after their playing days were done, and I'm glad I got to know them a little bit. Thanks, Mr.Kahn.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book is called a classic by many, and I agree it is a fantasticly written book, but I'm not sure I would rank it amongst the best baseball books. Kahn tells his life story as it happened with the Brooklyn Dodgers. The Dodgers always the bridesmaid never the bride taught him many lessons as he grew up with the team. It is a great picture of a time in America when the team and its town were so interwoven in a way that is impossible today. The Dodgers were a part of Brooklyn more than a lot of other teams and cities, this book is a great memory of that relationship.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a classic book, and I suppose deservedly so, but I have to admit to being somewhat disappointed. Maybe because of the central role played by Kahn himself here. But I suppose Kahn was building a model that was later to be refined. See "The Last Good Season" for a later model.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
An interesting look at the life of a baseball fan that becomes a sports writer. And the lives of the men that changed baseball. I quick peak at some interesting lives that will lead you to other, more in depth books on these incredible men.
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This, with the possible exception of [book:The Glory of Their Times], is the best baseball book ever penned. Then again, after only a few pages you realize this isn't really a book about baseball.
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