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For six extraordinary years around the turn of the millennium, the Yankees were baseball's unstoppable force, with players such as Paul O'Neill, Derek Jeter, and Mariano Rivera. But for the players and the coaches, baseball Yankees-style was also an almost unbearable pressure cooker of anxiety, expectation, and infighting. With owner George Steinbrenner at the controls, the Yankees money machine spun out of control.

In this new edition of The Last Night of the Yankee Dynasty, Buster Olney tracks the Yankees through these exciting and tumultuous seasons, updating his insightful portrait with a new introduction that walks readers through Steinbrenner's departure from power, Joe Torre's departure from the team, the continued failure of the Yankees to succeed in the postseason, and the rise of Hank Steinbrenner. With an insider's familiarity with the game, Olney reveals what may have been an inevitable fall that last night of the Yankee dynasty, and its powerful aftermath.

Topics: Sports and New York City Pro Sports Teams

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 6, 2009
ISBN: 9780061981081
List price: $8.99
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Pretty good, but it plays more like a series of newspaper profiles bridged by brief descriptions of each inning of Game 7 of the 2001 World Series.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Olney's thesis (unquestionably correct) is that the latest incarnation of the New York Yankee dynasty ended in November 2001 when the team lost the World Series to the Arizona Diamonsbacks.Since that time the Yankee organization has left the formula that made it a success, namely the cultivation of home grown talent, emphasis on pitching depth, and the importance of team chemistry. The Yankees have returned to their foolish ways that were the M.O. of the 1980s, namely depleting minor league resources, foolish spending, ill-fitting sluggers, no pitching, and wasted money. Olney pays homage to Daniel Okrent's "9 Innings" as he takes us through game 7 of the World Series, inning by inning, almost pitch by pitch. Olney uses the framework of the game to explore the history of the 2001 roster and how they came to be a Yankee.Olney focuses a great deal on the importance of team chemistry and this is really the book's strength. It's hard not to like the various players, O'Neill, Jeter, Posada, Rivera, Williams, Brosius, Mussina, et. al. when one learns how much pride each of these players took not only in their craft, but in being part of the most storied organization in sports. One even learns that Roger Clemens, the INFAMOUS Roger Clemens, was universally considered to be a great teammate.However, in reading "Last Night..." one gets the feeling that you aren't really learning anything new. This is the Yankees we are talking about here, the most covered and well known team in all of sport. The exploits of the Jeters and Clemens and so forth have been well chronicled and replayed on ESPN ad nauseum. Though lacking in any groundbreaking insights (apparently this Steinbrenner character is a real asshole), Olney does have an eye for human drama and does give us an interesting glimpse inside the Yankee clubhouse.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

Pretty good, but it plays more like a series of newspaper profiles bridged by brief descriptions of each inning of Game 7 of the 2001 World Series.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Olney's thesis (unquestionably correct) is that the latest incarnation of the New York Yankee dynasty ended in November 2001 when the team lost the World Series to the Arizona Diamonsbacks.Since that time the Yankee organization has left the formula that made it a success, namely the cultivation of home grown talent, emphasis on pitching depth, and the importance of team chemistry. The Yankees have returned to their foolish ways that were the M.O. of the 1980s, namely depleting minor league resources, foolish spending, ill-fitting sluggers, no pitching, and wasted money. Olney pays homage to Daniel Okrent's "9 Innings" as he takes us through game 7 of the World Series, inning by inning, almost pitch by pitch. Olney uses the framework of the game to explore the history of the 2001 roster and how they came to be a Yankee.Olney focuses a great deal on the importance of team chemistry and this is really the book's strength. It's hard not to like the various players, O'Neill, Jeter, Posada, Rivera, Williams, Brosius, Mussina, et. al. when one learns how much pride each of these players took not only in their craft, but in being part of the most storied organization in sports. One even learns that Roger Clemens, the INFAMOUS Roger Clemens, was universally considered to be a great teammate.However, in reading "Last Night..." one gets the feeling that you aren't really learning anything new. This is the Yankees we are talking about here, the most covered and well known team in all of sport. The exploits of the Jeters and Clemens and so forth have been well chronicled and replayed on ESPN ad nauseum. Though lacking in any groundbreaking insights (apparently this Steinbrenner character is a real asshole), Olney does have an eye for human drama and does give us an interesting glimpse inside the Yankee clubhouse.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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