From the Publisher

From Attica Locke, a writer and producer of FOX’s Empire:

The Cutting Season is a rare murder mystery with heft, a historical novel that thrills, a page-turner that makes you think. Attica Locke is a dazzling writer with a conscience.”—Dolen Perkins-Valdez, New York Times bestselling author of Wench

After her breathtaking debut novel, Black Water Rising, won acclaim from major publications and respected crime fiction masters like James Ellroy and George Pelecanos, Locke returns with The Cutting Season, a second novel easily as gripping and powerful as her first—a heart-pounding thriller that interweaves two murder mysteries, one on Belle Vie, a historic landmark in the middle of Lousiana’s Sugar Cane country, and one involving a slave gone missing more than one hundred years earlier. Black Water Rising was nominated for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize, an Edgar® Award, and an NAACP Image Award, and was short-listed for the Orange Prize in the U.K.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062097743
List price: $10.99
Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
Availability for The Cutting Season: A Novel
With a 30 day free trial you can read online for free
  1. This book can be read on up to 6 mobile devices.

Related Articles

NPR
1 min read
Pop Culture

Music Magazine: Sergio Mendoza, Vinyl Collectors And Tejano Punks On Film

Now and then, Alt.Latino offers programs that feature a single artist in conversation about life, art and anything else on their mind. But if we waited to speak with all of the artists who catch our attention one week at a time, it would take ... well, a long time. So this week, we offer three shorter profiles of artists — some DJs, a musician and a pair of filmmakers — who are capturing Latino culture in three very distinct forms. Sarah Ventre, from NPR Member station KJZZ in Tucson, Ariz., conducts a great Q&A with Tucson musician Sergio Mendoza. He talks about his love for 1940s-style mambo
New York Magazine
1 min read

Our Art Critic’s 5 Most Anticipated

RASHID JOHNSON SEPT. 8, HAUSER & WIRTH Johnson brings a beautiful brutality to materials; a hatchet man’s sense of cutting to the core of what he’s after. Paintings, performance, drawing, and sculpture will be featured in this gigantic show. If Johnson really brings it performance-wise, great things could happen. AGNES MARTIN OCT. 7, GUGGENHEIM Born in desolate rural Saskatchewan and a longtime denizen of desolate rural New Mexico, Martin (1912-2004) was the amazing maker of mysterious, minimal, meditative pale paintings. Coma-inducing, hallucinatory turns of subtle touch in sweet geometr
New York Magazine
5 min read

253 Minutes With … David Salle

THESE ARE UNREHEARSED comments,” David Salle warns me, or maybe himself, as we pause in front of one of his paintings, Fooling With Your Hair, from 31 years ago. We’re walking through a show of his early work, along with that of two contemporaries and fellow Hamptonians, Ross Bleckner and Eric Fischl, called “Unfinished Business,” at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton. Salle is attempting, for my benefit, to push himself into a kind of reverie about his old work, but his cautiousness over the performance keeps getting in the way. (He’s better at ginning up appreciation for Bleckner and Fisc