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The myth of innovation is that brilliant ideas leap fully formed from the minds of geniuses. In reality, most innovations are borne from rigor and discipline. Breakthrough ideas—whether for a new bicycle, an advertising campaign, a treatment plan for diabetes, or a program aimed at tackling the national obesity epidemic—emerge not by chance, but by studying and embracing the immediate challenges we encounter every day in our offices and homes, laboratories and hospitals, classrooms and conference rooms, and in all the spaces in between. We don't simply realize solutions; we design them.

In this book Tim Brown, CEO of the celebrated innovation and design firm IDEO, introduces us to design thinking. Design is not just about creating elegant objects or beautifying the world around us. The best designers match necessity to utility, constraint to possibility, and need to demand. These design thinkers rely on rigorous observations of how we use spaces and the objects and services that occupy them; they discover patterns where others see complexity and confusion; they synthesize new ideas from seemingly disparate fragments; and they convert problems into opportunities. Design thinking is a method in which genius, in the end, is not required.

Design thinking is valuable not just in so-called creative industries or for people tasked with designing products. Rather, it is often most powerful when applied to abstract, multifaceted problems: improving a guest experience at a hotel, encouraging bank customers to save more, or developing a compelling narrative for a public-service campaign. It has been used by organizations such as Nokia to rethink global gaming and by the Department of Energy to encourage conservation. Design thinking is now being applied to address a wide range of issues and concerns, from the delivery of clean drinking water in the developing world to improving the efficacy of airport security and microfinancing.

This is not a book by designers for designers; this is a blueprint for creative leaders seeking to infuse design thinking—an approach for creative problem solving—into all facets of their organizations, products, or services to discover new alternatives for business and society as a whole.

Written with imagination, humor, and vision, this vital and inspiring guide is essential reading for anyone confronting the challenges of today in order to create the opportunities of tomorrow.

Topics: Organization, Design, Innovation, Creativity, Inspirational, Prescriptive, and Guides

Published: HarperCollins on Sep 29, 2009
ISBN: 9780061937743
List price: $14.99
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Jim Chee is sure he's arrested the right man for the murder of one of his officers, and Janet Pete as usual is on the opposite side as defense attorney. Add to that a return to the death penalty, and Chee's determination is even more significant, as it may lead to a result so against his principles.Joe Leaphorn has been asked to find a young scientist who has disappeared in the same area where Chee's murder occurred. Of course, the retired lieutenant and the acting lieutenant will cross paths on their separate investigations.Better than Fallen Man, but still a bit creaky.read more
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A Hopi eagle poacher is discovered over the body of a murdered Navajo Tribal police officer. Looks like an open and shut case until Joe Leaphorn identifies some unanswered questions. Solution—find the “first eagle.” Once Joe convinces Chee that the case against the Hopi has some big holes in it, they work together to find the real killer and along the way find another body which turns out to be linked to the first murder. Janet Pete is back to defend the accused killer. Her presence adds to Chee’s problems as he tries to figure out what his feelings for Janet and Bernie are.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I always enjoy a Tony Hillerman mystery - light reading, interesting characters, interesting Arizona backdrop. I also like the way he starts with three seemingly unrelated stories and they get closer and closer together until they blend. He has a style that appears so simple, but I'm sure it was difficult to develop.In this story, Jim Chee comes upon Robert Jano kneeling over the almost dead body of Officer Kinsman and arrests him for murder. Jano has a motive - he was paching an eagle for a Hopi Ceremony. It is not the first time Kinsman has caught him doing this. One description I liked the best was that of an old Indian woman named Old Lady Notah who was a sheepherder. She believed she had seen a skinwalker, a devil, and described him as part snowman with a trunk on his back like an elephant and his face flashed like a camera.read more
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Reviews

Jim Chee is sure he's arrested the right man for the murder of one of his officers, and Janet Pete as usual is on the opposite side as defense attorney. Add to that a return to the death penalty, and Chee's determination is even more significant, as it may lead to a result so against his principles.Joe Leaphorn has been asked to find a young scientist who has disappeared in the same area where Chee's murder occurred. Of course, the retired lieutenant and the acting lieutenant will cross paths on their separate investigations.Better than Fallen Man, but still a bit creaky.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A Hopi eagle poacher is discovered over the body of a murdered Navajo Tribal police officer. Looks like an open and shut case until Joe Leaphorn identifies some unanswered questions. Solution—find the “first eagle.” Once Joe convinces Chee that the case against the Hopi has some big holes in it, they work together to find the real killer and along the way find another body which turns out to be linked to the first murder. Janet Pete is back to defend the accused killer. Her presence adds to Chee’s problems as he tries to figure out what his feelings for Janet and Bernie are.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I always enjoy a Tony Hillerman mystery - light reading, interesting characters, interesting Arizona backdrop. I also like the way he starts with three seemingly unrelated stories and they get closer and closer together until they blend. He has a style that appears so simple, but I'm sure it was difficult to develop.In this story, Jim Chee comes upon Robert Jano kneeling over the almost dead body of Officer Kinsman and arrests him for murder. Jano has a motive - he was paching an eagle for a Hopi Ceremony. It is not the first time Kinsman has caught him doing this. One description I liked the best was that of an old Indian woman named Old Lady Notah who was a sheepherder. She believed she had seen a skinwalker, a devil, and described him as part snowman with a trunk on his back like an elephant and his face flashed like a camera.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very nice book. I read Fallen Man a long time ago, and didn't remember much about it except the pacing, setting, and culture of the Navajos made it interesting. This book again paints a great picture of the Navajo nation with its setting and pacing. This story is made better by telling the tale of man's struggle with plagues. If you are interested in ideas around the spread of virus's and killer bacteria, then you may enjoy this book. I certainly found the crime detective story and the plague detective story compelling.
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In Hillerman's suspense novel, Navajo Tribal policeman Jim Chee and his mentor, Joe Leaphorn, discover a deadly killer stalking the reservation in the most chilling and beautifully crafted novel from the master of Southwestern suspense. In addition to its finely crafted wrought plot, this book offers a wealth of Tony Hillerman's signature gifts--glorious descriptions of the high desert, delicately drawn characters, and eloquent insights into the foibles and wisdom of the native peoples.
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My first thought, upon finishing this novel, was 'Jim Chee would be a hard man to be in love with'. This book reminded me a lot of the novel where Jim 'breaks up' with Mary Landon. And maybe he seems so hard because he is coming from a different cultural tradition where some things really are non-negotiable. This is the first book where I really felt like Chee and Leaphorn were really starting to like each other. While some of the plot devices have been used in this series again, the story was interesting.
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