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In the span of five violent hours on August 29, 2005, Hurricane Katrina destroyed major Gulf Coast cities and flattened 150 miles of coastline. But it was only the first stage of a shocking triple tragedy. On the heels of one of the three strongest hurricanes ever to make landfall in the United States came the storm-surge flooding, which submerged a half-million homes—followed by the human tragedy of government mismanagement, which proved as cruel as the natural disaster itself.

In The Great Deluge, bestselling author Douglas Brinkley finds the true heroes of this unparalleled catastrophe, and lets the survivors tell their own stories, masterly allowing them to record the nightmare that was Katrina.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061744730
List price: $13.99
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A heavy one to embark on, but it is well-written and exposes/highlights many truths of the day leading up to and the weeks following the biggest natural disaster in American history, Hurricane Katrina. Well documented, researched, and organized, Brinkley answers many questions people may about the Katrina and response from the city, state, and national response. This is the 2006 version; however, I know an updated 2009 version came out which may have some updated evidence, follow-up interviews, or additional information in the following years. I would keep this on my shelves for students inquiring about the events of K or for those who are working on a research project.more
I am not a fan of Douglas Brinkley for some probably petty reasons but I did enjoy this book. I've wanted to read it for years so was glad to finally have a chance.more
I wouldn't call it delicious irony, but it's pretty ironic that we're bracing for a hurricane to hit the East Coast and I've just finished Douglas Brinkley's The Great Deluge, a recounting of the horrors following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (today being just a few days shy of the six year anniversary of the event). Visiting New Orleans just this past month prompted my interest in the subject, where swaths of still-unoccupied or still-damaged row houses dominate the landscape in sections of the Treme, Marigny, and other neighborhoods.Covering a week-long period that involves days before and after the Hurricane's landfall, Brinkley documents the ineptitude of government officials and inability of government institutions to take charge that led to the "federally-induced disaster" as locals have taken to describing it. The void of responsibility was filled by the man-on-the-street who took it upon themselves to help out those in need, with a myriad of examples provided by Brinkley. Told in a style that deftly balances finger-pointing with a recounting of compassionate deeds, Brinkley has written an immensely important contribution to the literature of natural and government-induced disasters.more
This is a compelling and seemingly even-handed retelling of Hurricane Katrina and the resulting aftermath and response. The stories of individuals are used to illuminate and emphasize points that the author makes about the horror of the situation and the plight caused by not only the storm but also the failure of the levees and the inability of all levels of the government to react quickly and decisively. There is plenty of blame to go around when it comes to government ineptitude and the author assigns it where it is due. However, he also points out some of the successes that weren't originally brought to light in the initial media coverage. This book will make you angry all over again about the way that this unprecedented natural and man-made disaster was handled but it also allows you to celebrate the way that individuals stepped up to help out their fellow man. This book should be required reading for anyone who is working in the government and disaster relief agencies so that mistakes that we made with the Hurricane Katrina response will never be made again.more
Read all 12 reviews

Reviews

A heavy one to embark on, but it is well-written and exposes/highlights many truths of the day leading up to and the weeks following the biggest natural disaster in American history, Hurricane Katrina. Well documented, researched, and organized, Brinkley answers many questions people may about the Katrina and response from the city, state, and national response. This is the 2006 version; however, I know an updated 2009 version came out which may have some updated evidence, follow-up interviews, or additional information in the following years. I would keep this on my shelves for students inquiring about the events of K or for those who are working on a research project.more
I am not a fan of Douglas Brinkley for some probably petty reasons but I did enjoy this book. I've wanted to read it for years so was glad to finally have a chance.more
I wouldn't call it delicious irony, but it's pretty ironic that we're bracing for a hurricane to hit the East Coast and I've just finished Douglas Brinkley's The Great Deluge, a recounting of the horrors following Hurricane Katrina in 2005 (today being just a few days shy of the six year anniversary of the event). Visiting New Orleans just this past month prompted my interest in the subject, where swaths of still-unoccupied or still-damaged row houses dominate the landscape in sections of the Treme, Marigny, and other neighborhoods.Covering a week-long period that involves days before and after the Hurricane's landfall, Brinkley documents the ineptitude of government officials and inability of government institutions to take charge that led to the "federally-induced disaster" as locals have taken to describing it. The void of responsibility was filled by the man-on-the-street who took it upon themselves to help out those in need, with a myriad of examples provided by Brinkley. Told in a style that deftly balances finger-pointing with a recounting of compassionate deeds, Brinkley has written an immensely important contribution to the literature of natural and government-induced disasters.more
This is a compelling and seemingly even-handed retelling of Hurricane Katrina and the resulting aftermath and response. The stories of individuals are used to illuminate and emphasize points that the author makes about the horror of the situation and the plight caused by not only the storm but also the failure of the levees and the inability of all levels of the government to react quickly and decisively. There is plenty of blame to go around when it comes to government ineptitude and the author assigns it where it is due. However, he also points out some of the successes that weren't originally brought to light in the initial media coverage. This book will make you angry all over again about the way that this unprecedented natural and man-made disaster was handled but it also allows you to celebrate the way that individuals stepped up to help out their fellow man. This book should be required reading for anyone who is working in the government and disaster relief agencies so that mistakes that we made with the Hurricane Katrina response will never be made again.more
Could not put it down. An accurate record of a shameful time in US history.more
This is an outstanding book documenting what happened in New Orleans and surrounds after Hurrican Katrina. The author, Douglas Brinkley is a historian at Tulane.more
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