Reader reviews for Misquoting Jesus

Eye opening indeed
Very critical to analytical minds!!
Highly recommended to Christians like myself!!!!
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If you are looking for the definitive book on why you no longer have to go to church with your parents/spouse, etc, this is not it. Like Spong, Ehrman is really giving us an overview of current academic scholarship concerning the New Testament. Much of what he writes here can be found in any seminary Bible survey course. But unlike Spong Ehrman a) does not claim that is a all new discovery, and therefore discredits Faith As We Know It, and b) handles his conclusions with care. Essentially this is a popular introduction to textual analysis, and a very good one. Ehrman does treat us to his original scholarship, and that is a treat in this book. No Grand Conspiracies, no Da Vinci Code type coverups, just good scholarship on the Bible, and in the end, that does both the Bible and those who want to use it properly a great service.
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A good general introduction to the ways scholars study the manuscripts of the New Testament to determine the earliest form of the texts available. Ehrman discusses some of the ways scribes altered the texts they copied, often accidentally, occasionally for ideological reasons. Some good discussions of individual instances of alteration, but this book is less strong explaining a unified theory of how to evaluate the readings. How, for example, to honor the earliest manuscripts available while realizing that later witness (sometimes small number of these) might represent earlier readings.
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A scholarly treatise that is very readable.
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This is an excellent book that does a great job of illuminating the types of textual criticism that are essential to understanding the Bible. Ehrman puts forth several excellent examples of places where there are differences in the text in the original Bible manuscripts and does so without putting forth a religious argument for one over the other. He doesn't try to show us every place in the Bible where there are multiple readings, nor does he claim that it is impossible to recreate the original texts. Instead, he shows us some of the inherent problems in this sort of work and gives some good examples of places where traditional readings are probably incorrect. Best of all, he writes with a lay audience in mind so that anyone can pick up this book and follow his examples without being a scholar in textual criticism. Well done!
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Great read. Laregly well researched and reasoned. Not entirely balanced, but has some good information.
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What if the Bible were more like the Wikipedia than the exact Word of God? With thousands of people making changes over hundreds of years, except with no track back. How could you ever trust it, much less condemn people to hell because of someone's interpretation of it? Hold onto your head, because that's exactly what happened. All kinds of basic, dare I say—fundamental—changes were made to the New Testament and no one can possibly know how much was changed, whether it's about snake handling or virgin birth. Ehrman makes a very good case for taking a more relaxed view about the Passion o' Christ and seeing it for the metaphor that it is, rather than divine smackdown some would have it be. Worth a look if you're a skeptic and don't know why, or a Christian who wants to test his faith.
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This is a book written by a former Evangelical Christian who has studied Biblical history in depth. It is an amazing book that looks at the history of the Bible, how it came to be written, translated, and interpreted. For those who believe that the Bible is the inerrant work of God, it is important to remember that, while God may ahve had all the ideas, man was still responsible for the editorial process. This is a well-written and accessible introduction to Biblical studies and textual analysis.
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This is a well-written brief review of the accepted textual problems found in the New Testament. The book was written to assist laypeople in their understanding of how the textual tradition of the NT has been modified over time. None of it is really controversial yet as Ehrman explains there are no books which attempt to explain academic pursuits in regards to the reliability of the NT text. He explains that as a devout young person he innocently believed that the words of the text were inerrant however as an academic he began to understand that we did not have the actual words of Scripture. His academic interests led him to more fully understand the complexity of the transmission and he faithfully surveys the history of scholarship regarding the textual tradition. Along the way he demonstrates how specific Scriptural passages are not well attested, or have been modified for theological reasons or for the sake of clarity.
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After a long dry streak, I'm hitting on a lot of books I'm really enjoying. This is one of those.Misquoting Jesus is a concise(ish) layperson's guide to alterations made to the Bible over its lifespan. The author is a noted Biblical scholar, and though scholarship doesn't necessarily lend itself to readable treatises, I was able to easily understand both his arguments and his explanations of the linguistics involved. Moreover, a lot of it was terribly fascinating stuff. At the very least, *I* found information about the compassionification of Jesus, the anti-Semitic edits, etc. to be fascinating. The author has an understated sense of humour about the topic that shines through at unexpected times, and he made me laugh more than once.Plus, a lot of additional recommended resources in the notes! Woo hoo!
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