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UnavailableEgypt: The Book of Chaos
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Egypt: The Book of Chaos

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Egypt: The Book of Chaos

ratings:
2.5/5 (5 ratings)
Length:
377 pages
7 hours
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 6, 2011
ISBN:
9780062097200
Format:
Book

Description

The future ofEgypt lies in the hands of the Medjay’s chiefdetective Rahotep in the final, gripping installmentof Nick Drake’s acclaimed Ancient Egyptian trilogy. Following Nefertitiand Tutankhamun, Egypt: The Book of Chaos putsRahotep on a high-stakes adventure across enemyempires and rogue states on a top-secret mission to secure the fate of thedynasty. Readers of Stacy Schiff’s Cleopatraand anyone fascinated by ancient cultures and unspoken secrets will beinstantly drawn in by Drake’s magisterial recreation of one of history’s greatunsolved mysteries. Incorporating his own research through the sites,monuments, ruins, and museums of Egypt, Drake brings vividly back to life anera long ago swallowed by the shifting sands of time in this powerful novel ofloyalty, ambition, struggle, and destiny.
Publisher:
Released:
Dec 6, 2011
ISBN:
9780062097200
Format:
Book

About the author

Nick Drake is the author of Nefertiti and Tutankhamun, the first two books in the Rahotep detective trilogy. He has published two award-winning collections of poetry, and his play was performed at the National Theater in London. His screenplays include the critically acclaimed Romulus, My Father (starring Eric Bana), which won Best Film at the Australian Film Awards in 2007. He lives in London.


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Reviews

What people think about Egypt

2.6
5 ratings / 2 Reviews
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Reader reviews

  • (2/5)
    This was essentially an episode of "24" set in ancient Egypt.
  • (4/5)
    This is the third installment in Drake's Egypt series featuring the Medjay investigator Rahotep. As with the first two books, Drake's vivid descriptions and thorough details bring ancient Egypt to life, and he continues to depict complex characters that the reader will root for, but not always agree with. This is especially true with the main character Rahotep. Unlike the first two books, the majority of this book does not take place in Egypt, but in the Hittite empire and surrounding territories. I did not like the direction that Rahotep's character took; he became too hard to sympathize with at times. Also, the reveal of the ultimate villian behind the opium ring seemed rushed and out-of-character, as though this character was chosen to be the villian purely for shock value.