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Two surprising allies have emerged to aid the embattled ruler in a struggle he must win: Cefwyn's two young sons. Aewyn Marhanen is the prince destined to rule. Aewyn's half-brother, Elfwyn Aswydd—the bastard son of the king and the sorceress Tarien Aswydd—has spent years unaware of his parentage, yet now it is his time to emerge and claim the gifted birthright he's been denied for so long.

But a dark, sinister magic has crept close to the young man and seized hold of the kingdom. Nothing is as it seems, as the bonds of family strain against the powerful forces that would see them undone—and the battle is joined to unmask and destroy the malevolence that threatens to unhinge the king's peaceful and fragile reign.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061743979
List price: $7.99
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Coming on this book was like a chance meeting with old friends. It was great to catch up with Cefwyn, Ninevrise, and their relatives, friends, and enemies. I especially love Tristen, and during the considerable portions of the book when he is absent, I missed him as much as Cefwyn does. As the book goes on, it became clear that it was not a mere coda to the tale that has gone before it, but the start of a new cycle concerning Cefwyn's two sons, his heir Aewyn and the illegitimate Elfwyn. Can the two boys preserve the peace and security of the realm through their improbable friendship, or will they inevitably part and become enemies and rivals, opening the way for war, chaos, and evil? As I said, I love Tristen, but I don't think he treated Elfwyn very wisely: if the boy is a hollow vessel as everyone fears, why not try to fill him up with some of the guidance he is begging for? I'm once again hooked and captivated, waiting to see what comes next. As always, Cherryh's masterful world-building, sensuous prose, and facility with naming provide great pleasure.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
16 years have past since the last book, Cefwyn's children - bastard and royal - have grown to nearly manhood. Tristen has surrenedered Amefel to its aethling duke Crissand, and retreated to Yefnel of old as his master Mauryl had done before. He is too aware of the difficulties his presence causes in both this world and the grey Emuin and the entire Terrantine order have "faded", shrines stand empty and they cannot be found. Sequels to a "finished" series are always tricky, one must either invent a new bad guy of equal or greater magnitude, or find a way that they didn't fully die last time around. This latter approach is the one taken in Fortress of Ice.Elfwyn was always gong to be a concern, half Aswydd with sorceress's blood and links to the old darkness - Tristen adviced Cefwyn to win his friendship too. Emuin saw a hollow in his heart. Not evil. But with a potential for evil there. And so Cefwyn treated him well, warded not only by Cefwyn's good wishes but Gran's and Tristen's. However imprisoned Tarien his mother was, he had the right to visit her, and carried her wishes past the wards until one fateful day when everythign started going wrong.Another gripping tale. Cherryh writes the angst of growing up as a teenager so well. The illogical and pationate decisions and fragile self ego all culminating in a few moments where one has to face the consquences of your actions. Who in the end is to blame ofr who you are?read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.

Reviews

Coming on this book was like a chance meeting with old friends. It was great to catch up with Cefwyn, Ninevrise, and their relatives, friends, and enemies. I especially love Tristen, and during the considerable portions of the book when he is absent, I missed him as much as Cefwyn does. As the book goes on, it became clear that it was not a mere coda to the tale that has gone before it, but the start of a new cycle concerning Cefwyn's two sons, his heir Aewyn and the illegitimate Elfwyn. Can the two boys preserve the peace and security of the realm through their improbable friendship, or will they inevitably part and become enemies and rivals, opening the way for war, chaos, and evil? As I said, I love Tristen, but I don't think he treated Elfwyn very wisely: if the boy is a hollow vessel as everyone fears, why not try to fill him up with some of the guidance he is begging for? I'm once again hooked and captivated, waiting to see what comes next. As always, Cherryh's masterful world-building, sensuous prose, and facility with naming provide great pleasure.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
16 years have past since the last book, Cefwyn's children - bastard and royal - have grown to nearly manhood. Tristen has surrenedered Amefel to its aethling duke Crissand, and retreated to Yefnel of old as his master Mauryl had done before. He is too aware of the difficulties his presence causes in both this world and the grey Emuin and the entire Terrantine order have "faded", shrines stand empty and they cannot be found. Sequels to a "finished" series are always tricky, one must either invent a new bad guy of equal or greater magnitude, or find a way that they didn't fully die last time around. This latter approach is the one taken in Fortress of Ice.Elfwyn was always gong to be a concern, half Aswydd with sorceress's blood and links to the old darkness - Tristen adviced Cefwyn to win his friendship too. Emuin saw a hollow in his heart. Not evil. But with a potential for evil there. And so Cefwyn treated him well, warded not only by Cefwyn's good wishes but Gran's and Tristen's. However imprisoned Tarien his mother was, he had the right to visit her, and carried her wishes past the wards until one fateful day when everythign started going wrong.Another gripping tale. Cherryh writes the angst of growing up as a teenager so well. The illogical and pationate decisions and fragile self ego all culminating in a few moments where one has to face the consquences of your actions. Who in the end is to blame ofr who you are?
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
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