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New York Times bestseller God's Politics struck a chord with Americans disenchanted with how the Right had co-opted all talk about integrating religious values into our politics, and with the Left, who were mute on the subject. Jim Wallis argues that America's separation of church and state does not require banishing moral and religious values from the public square. God's Politics offers a vision for how to convert spiritual values into real social change and has started a grassroots movement to hold our political leaders accountable by incorporating our deepest convictions about war, poverty, racism, abortion, capital punishment, and other moral issues into our nation's public life. Who can change the political wind? Only we can.

Published: HarperCollins on Oct 13, 2009
ISBN: 9780061744396
List price: $7.99
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Highly recommended. A great book about the role that religion (and Christianity in particular) should and should not play in public discourse.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very interesting and provocative.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Passionate and polemical; in particular his point of view as a pro-life Dem. Nonetheless obviously partial in his criticisms (in spite of the title). Suffers from some flabbiness in the mid-section (but don't we all?).read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A firm statement of what the Left needs to hear and a vindication for frustrated folks of faith who are appalled at the way the Religious Right has appropriated godliness.The book is a compelling and easy read, if a bit repetitive. Wallis has a tendency to quote at length from open letters and newspaper ads he or his organization have written. These things should have been relegated to an appendix. I finally started skipping them.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A somewhat disappointing book that I'm using in an adult ed class that I'm teaching at church. Wallis has lots of valuable things to say & draws on rich experience to back it up, but I find this book cobbled together, repetitive, oversimplified (which, as some have told me, means very accessible), & too polemical for my taste. It claims to be balanced, but isn't.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a book stuffed full of common sense and good Christian, and I am sure all other religious groupings', sentiment. The book is,mainly, about America but so much of what Mr. Wallis says is true of Britain too. The right have high-jacked Christianity as a weapon to attack Gay people and to justify war against non-Christian countries whilst, the left declare religion to be the opiate of the people. This latter point is particularly interesting in the British context, as the church played a great part in setting up the Labour Party.I particularly like Mr Wallis' definition of religious politics (borrowed from Abraham Lincoln); " Our task should not be to invoke religion and the name of God by claiming God's blessing and endorsement for all our national policies and practices - saying, in effect, that God is on our side. Rather, we should pray and worry earnestly whether we are on God's side." This seems to, in a couple of short sentences, cut the ground from the 'Bible-bashers' and set a clear delineated path for all men, of whatever, religious and political persuasion. I shall try to bear it in mind.The saddest part of this book is that it was updated, with a new forward, for sale in Britain, following the re-election of George W Bush, in 2005. Jim Wallis is optimistic that the rational religious people of America will take back the Bible for the people: since then, of course, we have had the rise of what I can only describe as the religious nutters (aka the Tea Party). At the moment, this is an American entity but, what our transatlantic cousins do today, we Brits will follow a fortnight next Tuesday. I am not looking forward to this trend coming here!read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I find Wallis to be a Leftish version of what he criticizes on the Right -- someone who wants to impose his interpretation of Scripture on everyone else in America. Wallis criticizes the evangelical church for forgetting Jesus' words about providing for the poor and making peace. But rather than focus on changing the American church, Wallis devotes his attention to changing American government. He attacks the Pat Robertsons and G.W. Bushes of the Right for confusing the American Church with America the nation, but doesn't see that he does the exact same thing by calling for government policies to essentially replace and emulate the church's traditional role of supporting family, peace, and helping the poor.Wallis argues that faith-based non-profits can't do their jobs unless better funded by taxpayers. The shortcoming of Bush's Faith-Based Initiative was its lack of taxpayer funding. Rather than focus on increasing the voluntary giving of American Christians, Wallis wants to increase the forced redistribution from all Americans to non-profits through taxes.Wallis doesn't argue from a historical theological or philosophical perspective. Abraham Lincoln is about the oldest source as he draws from. Martin Luther King is held up as an ideal at least a dozen times because "He held his Constitution in one hand and his Bible in the other," we are told at least three times. Wallis rather annoyingly repeats his talking points over and again, making many pages superfluous.Wallis argues that the government should keep policies in line with what the majority of Christian denominations put out official stances on. The Iraq war was immoral because every denomination (except Southern Baptists) spoke out against it. Budgets are "moral documents," and all legislation should follow the prescription of the ecumenical Church-- increased taxes on the wealthy, increased transfers to the poor, higher minimum wage laws, "fair trade" instead of "free trade," funding "real education," debt forgiveness to poor countries, more environmental regulations, and a two-state solution for Israel and Palestine, etc. Not as much ink is given to why those causes are correct scripturally or what the historical stances of the Church has been. Jim Wallis agrees with it, therefore it's right.He accuses the Religious Right of "prooftexting," twisting Scripture out of context to support their ideals. But Wallis engages in his own prooftexting. For example, he uses quotes from prophets like Micah to argue for debt relief for poor countries. But in the very next chapter in dealing with capital punishment, which Wallis opposes as immoral, he ignores that the same prophets both advocated and carried out capital punishment as God's will. (I'm not saying we should interpret OT Israel as prescriptive for today, just pointing out that Wallis wants to use some prescriptions for today while ignoring others-- prooftexting.)In a chapter dealing with the global economy, Wallis decries "free trade" practices of the West/North as putting undue restrictions on the South. Any trade agreement that includes restrictions shouldn't be called or understood as "free trade." The best thing America could do for trade with the poor countries Wallis wants to help would be to immediately unilaterally eliminate all tariffs and quotas to give them unfettered access to U.S. markets. But Wallis doesn't point this out. Probably because it would be heavily opposed by the trade unions Wallis ironically supports as many American workers in those formerly protected industries would eventually lose their jobs. While painful for those workers who must find new occupations, the truly poor people-- those earning $2 a day or less-- would greatly benefit. Wallis wants to have it both ways.There are some really vague prescriptions, like promoting "real education." What is "real" education? Wallis never says, just decries the American government for not supporting it better. On trade and labor economics, Wallis seems really ignorant of the data. He prescribes raising the minimum wage as a poverty-reduction strategy without pointing out that most minimum wage workers aren't trying to support a family on it, a large number are teenagers and college students who are still dependents on their fairly well-off parents. How high should minimum wage be? Why not just raise the minimum wage to $1,000 an hour? Wallis doesn't think about it.Wallis spends much of the book arguing for Jubilee-style income redistribution and decrying how the highest-income Americans have seen incomes rise much higher and faster than everyone else. But rather than encouraging Christians to give more and spend less, or to be more conscientious of what products they are buying and lifestyles they are supporting, he simply advocates for government to tackle the problem. Wallis' shallow thinking shows up disappointingly in one of the final chapters, where he talks of his love for the NBA. Wallis doesn't point out that most NBA players are among the top 1% of the American income earners who have seen disproportionate income increases. It's apparently okay if an NBA player makes $10 million a year, so long as he is a "nice guy," and isn't a "slasher" or a "thug" like "Allen Iverson." Wallis apparently doesn't see any contradiction in supporting those salaries by purchasing tickets to NBA games or merchandise, nor does he call on the church to reevaluate its thinking about why entertainers and athletes are among the highest-paid in America. Because we need "fun and diversions." This is hypocrisy.I give this book 1 star out of 5. I was hoping for M. Douglas Meeks and got the Left's version of Jerry Falwell. I'm not sure who is more dangerous to have advising a President.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wallis discusses how he thinks Christians should approach certain political issues (mainly poverty, but also abortion, war, etc.). He comes back again and again to the idea that teh Bible mandates kindness and generosity to the poor. I liked Wallis's message, but I would have liked to see more ties to specific scriptures instead of one (or occasionally two) Biblical passages for each chapter followed by lots of opinion. This is nonetheless a thought-provoking book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I wish I would have read this book back in 2006 when it was first published. Reading it has made me want to pick up Wallis' most recent book immediately, as I'm sure his examples would be even fresher than my timing on reading this one. The principles he describes in the book are timeless, however, and I'm grateful for Wallis' leadership in the Christian faith.In some ways, it seems like Wallis tried to pack so much into this one book that some of the writing was jumbled. Claiborne is much more of a gifted storyteller than Wallis and tends to create more effective transitions in his writing (check out An Irresistible Revolution for an amazing book by Claiborne). However, I believe Wallis is certainly contributing to the challenge to believers to think critically about their political beliefs and how they align (or or misaligned) with their faith.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
God’s Politics offers a clarion call to make both our religious communities and our government more accountable to key values of the prophetic religious tradition - that is, make them pro-justice, pro-peace, pro-environment, pro-equality, pro-consistent ethic of life (beyond single issue voting), and pro-family (without making scapegoats of single mothers or gays and lesbians). These are the values of love and justice, reconciliation, and community that Jesus taught and that are at the core of what many of us believe, Christian or not.In many ways, Wallis agrees with the Religious Right about methods and disagrees about aim. Our governments (and our leaders) should be held accountable to the teachings of Jesus. Unlike the leaders of the Religious Right, Wallis takes a wider view of Christianity. They have focused almost entirely on changing laws on abortion and maintaining laws that forbid gay marriage. Wallis wants a broad agenda that more closely mirrors Christ’s documented life, which is the above mentioned pro-this and that. Since Wallis has widely talked about this on his own, I will not attempt to speak for him. I will note that he too is mainly talking about passing laws. Following Christ means working for the laws that will best mirror what Jesus would want.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Awesome, awe-inspiring book. Wallis really speaks to the heart of my political beliefs and towards putting faith into action. This is really a book I need to buy and read again and then put it in practice.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have to read this for my CHRISTIANITY IN CULTURE class, and overall it's pretty decent.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Recommended or quoted from by Ronald Rolheiser, May 3-5, 2013, King's House talks on Fear and Tensions within the Church and Culture and Ourselvesread more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Religion and politics seem to be highly polarised in America. Anyone who has spoken at length with American Christians will be familiar with the way that all too often political thought seems to seep into the Christian dialogue, and from the perspective of an outsider, it seems that these notions are frequently unchallenged, and often at odds with the message of the gospel.This book is then a timely call to Christians to re-evaluate their unchallenged assumptions, and to realise that so much of politics is anti Christian, that they do the church a dis-service in not taking a stand against it. The book has practical ideas of how to make a stand, and is a wake up call for anyone who thinks God would vote for a certain political party!There is less here for non Americans. The context of the book is clearly America and its politics, and an outsider would be wrong to read this book to feel smug about their own politics. In the UK religion is much less polarised, but the policies of the parties are no more moral for this. Non US readers should read the book with humility, wondering how the lessons and ideas here can be applied in their own context.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This wasn't that great. I ended up skimming, something I very very rarely do.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I appreciate Jim Wallis and what he is doing in American politics. I'm not necessarily a big fan of giving religion a bigger voice in the political scene, but I do think we need more voices of faith. I hope Wallis is motivated by his faith and not just his religion.I liked what he had to say in the book about poverty. Good stuff that we all need to be thinking about and acting on. I found the book to be somewhat repetitive and full of press statements, group statements, charters, and other such page fillers. It would have worked much better as a shorter book.Personally I tend to favor a more libertarian approach to politics, though since the economic crisis I am swaying much more to the left. I am also tempted to abstain from politics altogether, as I do not see any solution to any of life's problems there. I say all that to say, these views could have something to do with me giving Jim's book a lower rating.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I want to make everyone read this book, Christians, non-Christians, Democrats, Republicans, conservatives, liberals. I love how Wallis wants to make the world better, how he shows common ground between diverse groups, and how he nevertheless comes across as a deeply spiritual yet humble man.I plan to subscribe to Sojourners. I will take action. I will speak up. Thank you, Jim Wallis, for writing this book.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book covers the moral necessity of adressing poverty, war, life (abortion and death penalty), realistic family values, and HIV/AIDS. The author does a very good job at analysing these issues from a moral and Biblical perspectives. He uses Biblical perspectives because that's what the majority is familiar with, but he does it in such a way that is inclusive to all people with ethical and moral beliefs, not just Christians of any denomination.My only quibbles with his book are the facts that, while he does an excellent job at looking at some of the issues, he does not consider the full range of how to adress these issues. For instance, in his discussion of abortion issues as being part of the Culture of Life, he does not adress some of the key issues of abuse to women-rape and incest, lack of access to birth control, or the issues of men's roles in abortion-not using condoms, disrespect of women that leads to rape, and lack of financial support for mothers. By ignoring some of these important issues, he shows that he sometimes forgets to look at a full spectrum of an issue. But these ommissions are very rare. Overall, this is a wonderful book that encourages hopefullness and action. It is a call to moral action-not just Christian (I bring this up because I'm not Christian), but especially to once-a-week Christians.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As much as I love the sentiments and agree with much of what he had to say, I could not enjoy this book. He failed to say much more than has been said in many of the Sojourners advertisements and that is an absolute travesty. I feel as if I have heard much of this just by reading articles on the website, but I believe this might be helpful for those who might be looking for a new political response by a Christian. I would not say I am incredibly informed even, so I can not recommend this to any who even know a bit about Jim Wallis and Sojourners.read more
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Brilliant. This book raised two good questions for me.Firstly, why do people have to fit in to the media stereotypes of left and right? Can we not be wildly radical in some areas, and conservative in others in a way that defies pigeon-holing?Secondly why the blazes are secular humanists allowed to bring their secular values onto the public political stage, but people of faith are not permitted to bring their faith-based values? The cry "religion and politics don't mix" is very unhelpful, and ignores the example of people like Desmond Tutu and Martin Luther King.The book is an easy read in the sense that it flows and the language is accessible - but it is a salutary (if uncomfortable) read for someone like me who is instinctively conservative.It also gives the lie to the asinine one-dimensional characterisation of American Christianity in books like "The God Delusion". Real life is more complex than that.read more
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Reviews

Highly recommended. A great book about the role that religion (and Christianity in particular) should and should not play in public discourse.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Very interesting and provocative.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Passionate and polemical; in particular his point of view as a pro-life Dem. Nonetheless obviously partial in his criticisms (in spite of the title). Suffers from some flabbiness in the mid-section (but don't we all?).
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A firm statement of what the Left needs to hear and a vindication for frustrated folks of faith who are appalled at the way the Religious Right has appropriated godliness.The book is a compelling and easy read, if a bit repetitive. Wallis has a tendency to quote at length from open letters and newspaper ads he or his organization have written. These things should have been relegated to an appendix. I finally started skipping them.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
A somewhat disappointing book that I'm using in an adult ed class that I'm teaching at church. Wallis has lots of valuable things to say & draws on rich experience to back it up, but I find this book cobbled together, repetitive, oversimplified (which, as some have told me, means very accessible), & too polemical for my taste. It claims to be balanced, but isn't.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This is a book stuffed full of common sense and good Christian, and I am sure all other religious groupings', sentiment. The book is,mainly, about America but so much of what Mr. Wallis says is true of Britain too. The right have high-jacked Christianity as a weapon to attack Gay people and to justify war against non-Christian countries whilst, the left declare religion to be the opiate of the people. This latter point is particularly interesting in the British context, as the church played a great part in setting up the Labour Party.I particularly like Mr Wallis' definition of religious politics (borrowed from Abraham Lincoln); " Our task should not be to invoke religion and the name of God by claiming God's blessing and endorsement for all our national policies and practices - saying, in effect, that God is on our side. Rather, we should pray and worry earnestly whether we are on God's side." This seems to, in a couple of short sentences, cut the ground from the 'Bible-bashers' and set a clear delineated path for all men, of whatever, religious and political persuasion. I shall try to bear it in mind.The saddest part of this book is that it was updated, with a new forward, for sale in Britain, following the re-election of George W Bush, in 2005. Jim Wallis is optimistic that the rational religious people of America will take back the Bible for the people: since then, of course, we have had the rise of what I can only describe as the religious nutters (aka the Tea Party). At the moment, this is an American entity but, what our transatlantic cousins do today, we Brits will follow a fortnight next Tuesday. I am not looking forward to this trend coming here!
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I find Wallis to be a Leftish version of what he criticizes on the Right -- someone who wants to impose his interpretation of Scripture on everyone else in America. Wallis criticizes the evangelical church for forgetting Jesus' words about providing for the poor and making peace. But rather than focus on changing the American church, Wallis devotes his attention to changing American government. He attacks the Pat Robertsons and G.W. Bushes of the Right for confusing the American Church with America the nation, but doesn't see that he does the exact same thing by calling for government policies to essentially replace and emulate the church's traditional role of supporting family, peace, and helping the poor.Wallis argues that faith-based non-profits can't do their jobs unless better funded by taxpayers. The shortcoming of Bush's Faith-Based Initiative was its lack of taxpayer funding. Rather than focus on increasing the voluntary giving of American Christians, Wallis wants to increase the forced redistribution from all Americans to non-profits through taxes.Wallis doesn't argue from a historical theological or philosophical perspective. Abraham Lincoln is about the oldest source as he draws from. Martin Luther King is held up as an ideal at least a dozen times because "He held his Constitution in one hand and his Bible in the other," we are told at least three times. Wallis rather annoyingly repeats his talking points over and again, making many pages superfluous.Wallis argues that the government should keep policies in line with what the majority of Christian denominations put out official stances on. The Iraq war was immoral because every denomination (except Southern Baptists) spoke out against it. Budgets are "moral documents," and all legislation should follow the prescription of the ecumenical Church-- increased taxes on the wealthy, increased transfers to the poor, higher minimum wage laws, "fair trade" instead of "free trade," funding "real education," debt forgiveness to poor countries, more environmental regulations, and a two-state solution for Israel and Palestine, etc. Not as much ink is given to why those causes are correct scripturally or what the historical stances of the Church has been. Jim Wallis agrees with it, therefore it's right.He accuses the Religious Right of "prooftexting," twisting Scripture out of context to support their ideals. But Wallis engages in his own prooftexting. For example, he uses quotes from prophets like Micah to argue for debt relief for poor countries. But in the very next chapter in dealing with capital punishment, which Wallis opposes as immoral, he ignores that the same prophets both advocated and carried out capital punishment as God's will. (I'm not saying we should interpret OT Israel as prescriptive for today, just pointing out that Wallis wants to use some prescriptions for today while ignoring others-- prooftexting.)In a chapter dealing with the global economy, Wallis decries "free trade" practices of the West/North as putting undue restrictions on the South. Any trade agreement that includes restrictions shouldn't be called or understood as "free trade." The best thing America could do for trade with the poor countries Wallis wants to help would be to immediately unilaterally eliminate all tariffs and quotas to give them unfettered access to U.S. markets. But Wallis doesn't point this out. Probably because it would be heavily opposed by the trade unions Wallis ironically supports as many American workers in those formerly protected industries would eventually lose their jobs. While painful for those workers who must find new occupations, the truly poor people-- those earning $2 a day or less-- would greatly benefit. Wallis wants to have it both ways.There are some really vague prescriptions, like promoting "real education." What is "real" education? Wallis never says, just decries the American government for not supporting it better. On trade and labor economics, Wallis seems really ignorant of the data. He prescribes raising the minimum wage as a poverty-reduction strategy without pointing out that most minimum wage workers aren't trying to support a family on it, a large number are teenagers and college students who are still dependents on their fairly well-off parents. How high should minimum wage be? Why not just raise the minimum wage to $1,000 an hour? Wallis doesn't think about it.Wallis spends much of the book arguing for Jubilee-style income redistribution and decrying how the highest-income Americans have seen incomes rise much higher and faster than everyone else. But rather than encouraging Christians to give more and spend less, or to be more conscientious of what products they are buying and lifestyles they are supporting, he simply advocates for government to tackle the problem. Wallis' shallow thinking shows up disappointingly in one of the final chapters, where he talks of his love for the NBA. Wallis doesn't point out that most NBA players are among the top 1% of the American income earners who have seen disproportionate income increases. It's apparently okay if an NBA player makes $10 million a year, so long as he is a "nice guy," and isn't a "slasher" or a "thug" like "Allen Iverson." Wallis apparently doesn't see any contradiction in supporting those salaries by purchasing tickets to NBA games or merchandise, nor does he call on the church to reevaluate its thinking about why entertainers and athletes are among the highest-paid in America. Because we need "fun and diversions." This is hypocrisy.I give this book 1 star out of 5. I was hoping for M. Douglas Meeks and got the Left's version of Jerry Falwell. I'm not sure who is more dangerous to have advising a President.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Wallis discusses how he thinks Christians should approach certain political issues (mainly poverty, but also abortion, war, etc.). He comes back again and again to the idea that teh Bible mandates kindness and generosity to the poor. I liked Wallis's message, but I would have liked to see more ties to specific scriptures instead of one (or occasionally two) Biblical passages for each chapter followed by lots of opinion. This is nonetheless a thought-provoking book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I wish I would have read this book back in 2006 when it was first published. Reading it has made me want to pick up Wallis' most recent book immediately, as I'm sure his examples would be even fresher than my timing on reading this one. The principles he describes in the book are timeless, however, and I'm grateful for Wallis' leadership in the Christian faith.In some ways, it seems like Wallis tried to pack so much into this one book that some of the writing was jumbled. Claiborne is much more of a gifted storyteller than Wallis and tends to create more effective transitions in his writing (check out An Irresistible Revolution for an amazing book by Claiborne). However, I believe Wallis is certainly contributing to the challenge to believers to think critically about their political beliefs and how they align (or or misaligned) with their faith.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
God’s Politics offers a clarion call to make both our religious communities and our government more accountable to key values of the prophetic religious tradition - that is, make them pro-justice, pro-peace, pro-environment, pro-equality, pro-consistent ethic of life (beyond single issue voting), and pro-family (without making scapegoats of single mothers or gays and lesbians). These are the values of love and justice, reconciliation, and community that Jesus taught and that are at the core of what many of us believe, Christian or not.In many ways, Wallis agrees with the Religious Right about methods and disagrees about aim. Our governments (and our leaders) should be held accountable to the teachings of Jesus. Unlike the leaders of the Religious Right, Wallis takes a wider view of Christianity. They have focused almost entirely on changing laws on abortion and maintaining laws that forbid gay marriage. Wallis wants a broad agenda that more closely mirrors Christ’s documented life, which is the above mentioned pro-this and that. Since Wallis has widely talked about this on his own, I will not attempt to speak for him. I will note that he too is mainly talking about passing laws. Following Christ means working for the laws that will best mirror what Jesus would want.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Awesome, awe-inspiring book. Wallis really speaks to the heart of my political beliefs and towards putting faith into action. This is really a book I need to buy and read again and then put it in practice.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I have to read this for my CHRISTIANITY IN CULTURE class, and overall it's pretty decent.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Recommended or quoted from by Ronald Rolheiser, May 3-5, 2013, King's House talks on Fear and Tensions within the Church and Culture and Ourselves
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
Religion and politics seem to be highly polarised in America. Anyone who has spoken at length with American Christians will be familiar with the way that all too often political thought seems to seep into the Christian dialogue, and from the perspective of an outsider, it seems that these notions are frequently unchallenged, and often at odds with the message of the gospel.This book is then a timely call to Christians to re-evaluate their unchallenged assumptions, and to realise that so much of politics is anti Christian, that they do the church a dis-service in not taking a stand against it. The book has practical ideas of how to make a stand, and is a wake up call for anyone who thinks God would vote for a certain political party!There is less here for non Americans. The context of the book is clearly America and its politics, and an outsider would be wrong to read this book to feel smug about their own politics. In the UK religion is much less polarised, but the policies of the parties are no more moral for this. Non US readers should read the book with humility, wondering how the lessons and ideas here can be applied in their own context.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This wasn't that great. I ended up skimming, something I very very rarely do.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I appreciate Jim Wallis and what he is doing in American politics. I'm not necessarily a big fan of giving religion a bigger voice in the political scene, but I do think we need more voices of faith. I hope Wallis is motivated by his faith and not just his religion.I liked what he had to say in the book about poverty. Good stuff that we all need to be thinking about and acting on. I found the book to be somewhat repetitive and full of press statements, group statements, charters, and other such page fillers. It would have worked much better as a shorter book.Personally I tend to favor a more libertarian approach to politics, though since the economic crisis I am swaying much more to the left. I am also tempted to abstain from politics altogether, as I do not see any solution to any of life's problems there. I say all that to say, these views could have something to do with me giving Jim's book a lower rating.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
I want to make everyone read this book, Christians, non-Christians, Democrats, Republicans, conservatives, liberals. I love how Wallis wants to make the world better, how he shows common ground between diverse groups, and how he nevertheless comes across as a deeply spiritual yet humble man.I plan to subscribe to Sojourners. I will take action. I will speak up. Thank you, Jim Wallis, for writing this book.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
This book covers the moral necessity of adressing poverty, war, life (abortion and death penalty), realistic family values, and HIV/AIDS. The author does a very good job at analysing these issues from a moral and Biblical perspectives. He uses Biblical perspectives because that's what the majority is familiar with, but he does it in such a way that is inclusive to all people with ethical and moral beliefs, not just Christians of any denomination.My only quibbles with his book are the facts that, while he does an excellent job at looking at some of the issues, he does not consider the full range of how to adress these issues. For instance, in his discussion of abortion issues as being part of the Culture of Life, he does not adress some of the key issues of abuse to women-rape and incest, lack of access to birth control, or the issues of men's roles in abortion-not using condoms, disrespect of women that leads to rape, and lack of financial support for mothers. By ignoring some of these important issues, he shows that he sometimes forgets to look at a full spectrum of an issue. But these ommissions are very rare. Overall, this is a wonderful book that encourages hopefullness and action. It is a call to moral action-not just Christian (I bring this up because I'm not Christian), but especially to once-a-week Christians.
Is this review helpful? Yes | NoThank you for your feedback.
As much as I love the sentiments and agree with much of what he had to say, I could not enjoy this book. He failed to say much more than has been said in many of the Sojourners advertisements and that is an absolute travesty. I feel as if I have heard much of this just by reading articles on the website, but I believe this might be helpful for those who might be looking for a new political response by a Christian. I would not say I am incredibly informed even, so I can not recommend this to any who even know a bit about Jim Wallis and Sojourners.
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Brilliant. This book raised two good questions for me.Firstly, why do people have to fit in to the media stereotypes of left and right? Can we not be wildly radical in some areas, and conservative in others in a way that defies pigeon-holing?Secondly why the blazes are secular humanists allowed to bring their secular values onto the public political stage, but people of faith are not permitted to bring their faith-based values? The cry "religion and politics don't mix" is very unhelpful, and ignores the example of people like Desmond Tutu and Martin Luther King.The book is an easy read in the sense that it flows and the language is accessible - but it is a salutary (if uncomfortable) read for someone like me who is instinctively conservative.It also gives the lie to the asinine one-dimensional characterisation of American Christianity in books like "The God Delusion". Real life is more complex than that.
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