From the Publisher

In Clean Gut, Alejandro Junger, M.D, New York Times bestselling author of Clean and creator of the world-famous Clean Program, delivers a complete toolkit for reversing disease and sustaining life-long health.

All of today’s most-diagnosed ailments can be traced back to an injured and irritated gut. The gut is an intricate and powerful system, naturally designed to protect and heal the body every moment of every day  And yet for far too many of us, this remarkable system is in disrepair, which leads to all kinds of health problems—from extra pounds, aches and pains, allergies, mood swings, and lack of libido, to heart disease, cancer, autoimmune disorders, insomnia, and depression.

But we no longer have to be sick to get healthy. In this groundbreaking program, Alejandro Junger, M.D. explains how instead of treating the symptoms as they arise, we can preemptively attack disease before it takes root in the gut.

No matter your current state of health, you will benefit from this program: Clean Gut will help you put an end to everyday ailments, reverse chronic disease, and achieve true, long-lasting health.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780062075895
List price: $11.99
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