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A varsity letter jacket: it's exclusive, nearly unattainable, revered . . . and everything that's screwed up about Cutter High, as far as T. J. Jones is concerned. That's why T. J. is determined to have the Cutter All Night Mermen—the unlikeliest swim team a high school has ever seen—earn letter jackets of their own.

It won't be easy. For one thing, they don't even have a pool. They will fight for their dignity, they will fight with each other, and sometimes they will just fight. And then they will realize that a single moment can bring lifelong heartache or lifelong friendship. For T. J. and his crew of misfits, the quest may be far more valuable than the reward.

Published: HarperCollins on
ISBN: 9780061968532
List price: $9.99
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Read this in my undergrad YA lit course. Liked a lot, very moving boy centered story. Good for topics of bullying and standing up to adversity. But... I remember our class having a discussion about the MC's girlfriend how much of a flat 2D character she was and how it bugged us. Reading some of Crutcher's other work I've felt the same reaction at times.more
While I could get behind the main character here, I just found this book a little hard to take. While I do think teen novels should deal with tough issues and not shy away from unpleasantness, this one seemed a bit extreme. The disturbing nature of the work was heightened by the fact that the author, Chris Crutcher, works as a child psychologist and doubtless based much of the book's shocking violence on situations he has actually encountered. What was harder to swallow for me was the sheer concentration of cruelty and depravity. Can one small town harbor such an overwhelming cross-section of violence and irresponsible adults? Why is this one teenager seemingly the only one responsible for trying to right wrongs here? Also, considering the book's subject matter, the packaging of both of the popular editions seems off. The back cover of the Harper Teen edition makes the book sound like something appropriate for middle schoolers--a fun sports story about a goofy swim team of misfits. The novel, of course, is something else entirely. Informed readers is what we're going for here, everyone. This novel does spark some great serious conversation, but be aware that the contents are not what they appear from the outset!more
This book was as funny as it was devastating. I've never read a book by Chris Crutcher and this was so very poignant and articulate in its message that I will be looking for more by Crutcher to read.

At certain parts, I found T.J. a little arrogant for my liking, but he's a popular kid in high school, so I get it. There also were a lot of threads to follow, but it was handled so well by Crutcher that I didn't get too overly confused (some of the names did run together for me though)

My favorite part of this book: a healthy teenage relationship shown as a background to the story. It would have been easy to make it a focus and bring it into the storyline better - but it would have lessened the quality of the book.more
When TJ's teacher askes him to join a newly forming swim team, TJ's pretty sure it's not for him. Although a natural athlete, TJ's avoided organized sports for good reasons. But when he sees one of the high school jocks bullying a special needs student, he devises gets an idea. Crutcher writes realistic fiction, which is not my genre of first choice, but his characters & plots really grab you.more
I'll admit, the only reasons I wanted to read this is because some parents want to ban this from a high school class. After reading this book and seeing some of their comments I can guarantee that not one of them read this book.

Some of their gripes have to do with the profanity used. I'll admit, some of the profanity could have been held back. But most were essential to the telling of the story and more importantly to the telling of the characters.

I think I read this through different eyes because of all of this. I tried to read this as an educator in order to see if I felt if there was any educational value to this. This book touched upon so many important and relevant topics. Bullying, racial tension, and mental and physical abuse to name some of the big ones. This is absolutely a book I would have any high school student read.Pmore
I read this for Book Club. My rating is actually 3.5, but the stars don't let me do that half star thing. I started this book not liking it for about the first third of the book. The reason is that the protagonist is sooooo angry and really wants revenge against all kinds of people and society in general. I'm not real comfortable with anger and violent thoughts. However, I stuck with it because I knew I had to read the whole thing in order to be able to discuss it. Let's face it, if your name is The Tao you have every write to be angry for that alone. I'm really glad I did read the whole thing, because it's one of the books I think you can talk about for a long time.

After the first third I started to empathize with The Tao and it helped that he was using his anger not in a violent way but in a somewhat productive get-back-at-the-establishment-by-outsmarting-them way. I really loved the themes regarding bullying, people who are different, the outsized relationship of sports in our society, and particularly high school. I liked that the protagonist found a way to stand up for himself and for the other "different" people at his high school. The intelligent twists The Tao uses to get back at the powers that be in high school were brilliantly manipulative.

The father was wonderfully written and I'm so glad he wasn't perfect, though in many ways he was the best Dad possible. Also the English Teacher, Mr. Simet, who sponsored the swim team was a great example of the ways faculty find to help while still staying out of trouble with the administration.

The reason my rating isn't higher than 3.5 is that there were too many times I had to suspend disbelief during the story. I know why the author inserted these incidents or situations, but I thought they could have been better or made a little more realistic. In spite of that, I still recommend the book to anyone who has been bullied or is raising sons who don't fit the high school jock mold and feel left out.more
Though Chris Crutcher is the master of extremes, this book is a must-read. I have read this book multiple times, and I am always enthralled by the characters, backstories and all. As a high school reading teacher, I latch onto any book that my struggling readers are willing to delve into and Whale Talk is one of them.more
T J, whose full name is The Toa Jones (there’s a joke there if you pronounce it correctly), relates the story of his eighteenth year, the year he graduates. He has been asked by his English teacher to form a college swimming team, but there is no pool, and it seems T J is the only swimmer.T J gives a frank account of events of that year, not omitting his own short-comings. Raised by adoptive parents, he being the biological son of a European mother and Japanese/black American father, in a predominantly white small town outside Washington, he struggles to keep his temper in check in the face of the many injustices resulting from the racism and bigotry of small-minded jocks.Accepting the challenge of forming a swim team he assembles a curios bunch of misfits and the downtrodden and champions their cause as he strives to attain a coveted varsity Letter-Jacket, normally the preserve of high achievers in the accepted sports, for each member of his team. It is a heart-warming tale as the team unite in their cause despite the fact they seemed doomed to failure from the start. At the same time likeable T J has his own problems to deal with, but here his stable family upbringing helps him to maintain balance despite himself.At times funny, at times moving, with a tense and gripping finale, it makes for an involving story. It does get a little preachy at times, but it is a good cause, showing up racisms and family abuse for what it is; written by someone who clearly has some experience in such matters.more
There were plenty of places where I had to wipe away a tear after reading sections of this book, particularly in the strength and kindness characters' showed each other after facing cruelty at the hands of other characters and life. The story centers around TJ, a gifted athlete who doesn't buy into the school caste system which places varsity athletes at the center of the universe regardless of the content of their characters. TJ puts together a swim team of those who don't quite fit. Although he does it initially as a way to stick it to the jocks, it turns out that this group forms meaningful bonds. TJ's own family is pretty amazing, his adopted parents open their home to an abused girl just as they did for TJ when he was a toddler. TJ's parents, coaches, and counselor, are pretty amazing role models. Over and over again the adults remind TJ that when people behave badly, even evilly, it points to a cycle of abuse. Crutcher's work as a child and family therapist is a clear influence throughout the book. It's a layered narrative that woven together makes a complex, emotional story.more
Overall this is a good book. It starts off fairly slow but eventually picks up. I loved the character TJ and how he did his best to help everyone. His parents sound like great parents too. Not a big fan of the ending but understand why it ended the way it did.more
Although Chris Crutcher does not speak in the current idiom of boys, he still speaks to boys in this story about a multicultural kid living in a small town in rural Washington state. T.J., a multicultural kid who's blessed with intelligence and athletic ability is nevertheless a victim of racism. He decides to start a swim team for kids who are misfits in one way or another, after seeing a disabled kid bullied out of wearing his dead brother's varsity letter jacket because the boy is not himself an athlete. T.J.'s main conflict is between him and the small-town, white-supremacist types who rule the sports' world in town. There are both triumphs and tragedies in this story. Strangely, when the tragedy finally occurs, T.J.'s response to it is understated, after he has spent the whole book in barely restrained anger against the bullies.more
Good book dealing with racism, outcasts and swimming.T.J (The Tao) Jones is part black, Japanese and white, which makes him stand out in his suburban Washington town. Naturally athletic, the coaches at his high school constantly try to get T.J. to try out for sports, to no avail. That is, until, T.J.'s favorite English teacher convinces him to start a swim team to save his job.T.J. recruits a motley group of fellow students including one without a leg and one who is very overweight. Their stories intertwine and make for an interesting read.My one complaint about the story was how stereotypical the bullies were. I felt they were one-note and not as fully developed as the other characters. However, it doesn't take away from the story as may be expected.Highly recommended to those who like to fight for the underdog.more
A very powerful book about racism, stereotyping, and aggression. The book's metaphor about whales was perfect and how we should be helping one another and looking out for our own kind--humans--all humans--despite their backgrounds, color, age, etc.more
whale talk was an awesomely funny book, and yet it contained some serious thought-provoking issues that made me sick to my stomach to think that there are still people out there that judge by skin color, mental abilities, gender, age, etc. and use it as fuel to harass others. I loved T.J.'s personality - he was just so full of life that I couldn't help but smile most of the time. Plus his swimmates were also very funny. Sometimes it was hard to keep them straight, but their personalities were so very different but very hilarious. And I have to give total kudos to his parents, especially his father, because they were awesome individuals and totally had his back when T.J. decided to take a stand for what he believed in.The ending - oh, the ending! It totally made me cry! I wish I could say more, but I can't. Just that you should have a tissue handy when you get there, if you're the sort of person who cries during books and movies.whale talk would be perfect if you are feeling down and need a good laugh. But don't expect all laughs - there are some serious issues going on that will get your heart all twisted.more
This book is an interesting story with ever changing moods that keep you going. One minute reading this book you'll be laughing at something that's happened, the next you'll be on the verge of tears. It truly is a touching story and I strongly recommend anyone to experience it.more
When I first saw the cover of the book I knew right then and there that I wasn’t going to be very interested in this book. I know that they say never judge a book by its cover, but that saying does not included me in it. Every time that I am handed a book or looking at a book I always judge it; you may say because I had already had a set opinion in mind that I was going to let it affect me through out the book, but I didn’t. To me the setting and mood of the whole novel wasn’t very interesting and there wasn’t a lot of conflict in this story either and I like alot of conflict in my stories to be really interested in it. Yes, their may have been problem within the story, but to me some of those problems could have been solved a long time ago. Overall the novel wasn’t all so bad so don’t let my opinion effect your decision on reading this novel; remember everyone has a different opinion in every type of situation.more
I found that this book left little to be desired. It was well written, and very witty, but little stale if that makes sence. It didn't really go anywhere and was a slow read. The characters were interesting and the idea different but it's plot was for the most part is open. The main character or protagonist would be T.J Jones. He is a senior year and he wants to help out these kids who are constantly being harassed. His teacher wants him to be on the swim team he is coatching so T.J tells him that he wants these cetain people on the team and he will be on it as well. The book goes on about this teams differences and similaritys. overall i thought the book was okay.more
i've read this book twice now and i'm still not bored of it. The book had me going untill the last page. It revolves around the captain of cutter highschool's swim team, T.J jones. At his highschool the letterman jacket is the ultimate symbol for athletics, and anyone who wears it, therefore it's almost unattainable. When mike bourbor, one of the antagonists of the story, sees chris coughlin wearing his dead brothers letter jacket he starts to bully and threaten him. Thats when T.J. jones plots for a way chris, and others like him, can get a letter of their own. Then his journalism teacher, simet, proposes the idea of cutters first swim team. Along the way they make a team, bond with eachother, and battle racism and football players. I'd recommend this to anyone.more
Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher was a good all around book. It deals with many big problems in society that most people dont want to talk about, he directly addresses it. This book might not interest every reader though. I believe this is more of guy's book because it has a lot to do with sports and male testosterone. One of the most appealing parts of this story was the part where the main character stands up and trys to help all those that have been bullied and is trying to help them take revenge on the jocks who have terrorized there lives. It is a strong book in the sence that it deals with so many big problems in just one book such as raceism and abuse and those are only a select few. it was a good book.more
All T.J. Jones wanted was revenge from the jocks who thought they were so superior to everyone else. He wanted to show the jocks, the coach, and the entire school that even an outsider or someone that wasn't in major sports can earn the honor of wearing a letter jacket. However, T.J. could care less about the "pride" a letter jacket gives to a someone in Cutter High. He wants people like Chris Coughlin to have the opportunity to be a part of something. Pretty soon the swim team is born with a bright future and possibilities which include more than just trophies. Friendships are formed that will last longer than the season.more
This a pretty good book. I mean, it’s not my favorite, but I think the different development in the characters and theme of it is extremely interesting. It’s about a multiracial senior in high school, TJ, who is extremely athletically capable, but because he doesn’t like the way his school conducts sports he chooses not to join them. Well, he feels that way until he decides he’s going to stay a swim team for the school to help the outcasts of the school to wear the blue and gold jackets, that are so prestigious at Cutter high school. It deals with problems such as child abuse, spousal abuse, racism, and the effect of bullying. I definitely recommend this book. I even tried to get my mom to read it, but she was too busy at work; oh well, her loss.more
Read all 57 reviews

Reviews

Read this in my undergrad YA lit course. Liked a lot, very moving boy centered story. Good for topics of bullying and standing up to adversity. But... I remember our class having a discussion about the MC's girlfriend how much of a flat 2D character she was and how it bugged us. Reading some of Crutcher's other work I've felt the same reaction at times.more
While I could get behind the main character here, I just found this book a little hard to take. While I do think teen novels should deal with tough issues and not shy away from unpleasantness, this one seemed a bit extreme. The disturbing nature of the work was heightened by the fact that the author, Chris Crutcher, works as a child psychologist and doubtless based much of the book's shocking violence on situations he has actually encountered. What was harder to swallow for me was the sheer concentration of cruelty and depravity. Can one small town harbor such an overwhelming cross-section of violence and irresponsible adults? Why is this one teenager seemingly the only one responsible for trying to right wrongs here? Also, considering the book's subject matter, the packaging of both of the popular editions seems off. The back cover of the Harper Teen edition makes the book sound like something appropriate for middle schoolers--a fun sports story about a goofy swim team of misfits. The novel, of course, is something else entirely. Informed readers is what we're going for here, everyone. This novel does spark some great serious conversation, but be aware that the contents are not what they appear from the outset!more
This book was as funny as it was devastating. I've never read a book by Chris Crutcher and this was so very poignant and articulate in its message that I will be looking for more by Crutcher to read.

At certain parts, I found T.J. a little arrogant for my liking, but he's a popular kid in high school, so I get it. There also were a lot of threads to follow, but it was handled so well by Crutcher that I didn't get too overly confused (some of the names did run together for me though)

My favorite part of this book: a healthy teenage relationship shown as a background to the story. It would have been easy to make it a focus and bring it into the storyline better - but it would have lessened the quality of the book.more
When TJ's teacher askes him to join a newly forming swim team, TJ's pretty sure it's not for him. Although a natural athlete, TJ's avoided organized sports for good reasons. But when he sees one of the high school jocks bullying a special needs student, he devises gets an idea. Crutcher writes realistic fiction, which is not my genre of first choice, but his characters & plots really grab you.more
I'll admit, the only reasons I wanted to read this is because some parents want to ban this from a high school class. After reading this book and seeing some of their comments I can guarantee that not one of them read this book.

Some of their gripes have to do with the profanity used. I'll admit, some of the profanity could have been held back. But most were essential to the telling of the story and more importantly to the telling of the characters.

I think I read this through different eyes because of all of this. I tried to read this as an educator in order to see if I felt if there was any educational value to this. This book touched upon so many important and relevant topics. Bullying, racial tension, and mental and physical abuse to name some of the big ones. This is absolutely a book I would have any high school student read.Pmore
I read this for Book Club. My rating is actually 3.5, but the stars don't let me do that half star thing. I started this book not liking it for about the first third of the book. The reason is that the protagonist is sooooo angry and really wants revenge against all kinds of people and society in general. I'm not real comfortable with anger and violent thoughts. However, I stuck with it because I knew I had to read the whole thing in order to be able to discuss it. Let's face it, if your name is The Tao you have every write to be angry for that alone. I'm really glad I did read the whole thing, because it's one of the books I think you can talk about for a long time.

After the first third I started to empathize with The Tao and it helped that he was using his anger not in a violent way but in a somewhat productive get-back-at-the-establishment-by-outsmarting-them way. I really loved the themes regarding bullying, people who are different, the outsized relationship of sports in our society, and particularly high school. I liked that the protagonist found a way to stand up for himself and for the other "different" people at his high school. The intelligent twists The Tao uses to get back at the powers that be in high school were brilliantly manipulative.

The father was wonderfully written and I'm so glad he wasn't perfect, though in many ways he was the best Dad possible. Also the English Teacher, Mr. Simet, who sponsored the swim team was a great example of the ways faculty find to help while still staying out of trouble with the administration.

The reason my rating isn't higher than 3.5 is that there were too many times I had to suspend disbelief during the story. I know why the author inserted these incidents or situations, but I thought they could have been better or made a little more realistic. In spite of that, I still recommend the book to anyone who has been bullied or is raising sons who don't fit the high school jock mold and feel left out.more
Though Chris Crutcher is the master of extremes, this book is a must-read. I have read this book multiple times, and I am always enthralled by the characters, backstories and all. As a high school reading teacher, I latch onto any book that my struggling readers are willing to delve into and Whale Talk is one of them.more
T J, whose full name is The Toa Jones (there’s a joke there if you pronounce it correctly), relates the story of his eighteenth year, the year he graduates. He has been asked by his English teacher to form a college swimming team, but there is no pool, and it seems T J is the only swimmer.T J gives a frank account of events of that year, not omitting his own short-comings. Raised by adoptive parents, he being the biological son of a European mother and Japanese/black American father, in a predominantly white small town outside Washington, he struggles to keep his temper in check in the face of the many injustices resulting from the racism and bigotry of small-minded jocks.Accepting the challenge of forming a swim team he assembles a curios bunch of misfits and the downtrodden and champions their cause as he strives to attain a coveted varsity Letter-Jacket, normally the preserve of high achievers in the accepted sports, for each member of his team. It is a heart-warming tale as the team unite in their cause despite the fact they seemed doomed to failure from the start. At the same time likeable T J has his own problems to deal with, but here his stable family upbringing helps him to maintain balance despite himself.At times funny, at times moving, with a tense and gripping finale, it makes for an involving story. It does get a little preachy at times, but it is a good cause, showing up racisms and family abuse for what it is; written by someone who clearly has some experience in such matters.more
There were plenty of places where I had to wipe away a tear after reading sections of this book, particularly in the strength and kindness characters' showed each other after facing cruelty at the hands of other characters and life. The story centers around TJ, a gifted athlete who doesn't buy into the school caste system which places varsity athletes at the center of the universe regardless of the content of their characters. TJ puts together a swim team of those who don't quite fit. Although he does it initially as a way to stick it to the jocks, it turns out that this group forms meaningful bonds. TJ's own family is pretty amazing, his adopted parents open their home to an abused girl just as they did for TJ when he was a toddler. TJ's parents, coaches, and counselor, are pretty amazing role models. Over and over again the adults remind TJ that when people behave badly, even evilly, it points to a cycle of abuse. Crutcher's work as a child and family therapist is a clear influence throughout the book. It's a layered narrative that woven together makes a complex, emotional story.more
Overall this is a good book. It starts off fairly slow but eventually picks up. I loved the character TJ and how he did his best to help everyone. His parents sound like great parents too. Not a big fan of the ending but understand why it ended the way it did.more
Although Chris Crutcher does not speak in the current idiom of boys, he still speaks to boys in this story about a multicultural kid living in a small town in rural Washington state. T.J., a multicultural kid who's blessed with intelligence and athletic ability is nevertheless a victim of racism. He decides to start a swim team for kids who are misfits in one way or another, after seeing a disabled kid bullied out of wearing his dead brother's varsity letter jacket because the boy is not himself an athlete. T.J.'s main conflict is between him and the small-town, white-supremacist types who rule the sports' world in town. There are both triumphs and tragedies in this story. Strangely, when the tragedy finally occurs, T.J.'s response to it is understated, after he has spent the whole book in barely restrained anger against the bullies.more
Good book dealing with racism, outcasts and swimming.T.J (The Tao) Jones is part black, Japanese and white, which makes him stand out in his suburban Washington town. Naturally athletic, the coaches at his high school constantly try to get T.J. to try out for sports, to no avail. That is, until, T.J.'s favorite English teacher convinces him to start a swim team to save his job.T.J. recruits a motley group of fellow students including one without a leg and one who is very overweight. Their stories intertwine and make for an interesting read.My one complaint about the story was how stereotypical the bullies were. I felt they were one-note and not as fully developed as the other characters. However, it doesn't take away from the story as may be expected.Highly recommended to those who like to fight for the underdog.more
A very powerful book about racism, stereotyping, and aggression. The book's metaphor about whales was perfect and how we should be helping one another and looking out for our own kind--humans--all humans--despite their backgrounds, color, age, etc.more
whale talk was an awesomely funny book, and yet it contained some serious thought-provoking issues that made me sick to my stomach to think that there are still people out there that judge by skin color, mental abilities, gender, age, etc. and use it as fuel to harass others. I loved T.J.'s personality - he was just so full of life that I couldn't help but smile most of the time. Plus his swimmates were also very funny. Sometimes it was hard to keep them straight, but their personalities were so very different but very hilarious. And I have to give total kudos to his parents, especially his father, because they were awesome individuals and totally had his back when T.J. decided to take a stand for what he believed in.The ending - oh, the ending! It totally made me cry! I wish I could say more, but I can't. Just that you should have a tissue handy when you get there, if you're the sort of person who cries during books and movies.whale talk would be perfect if you are feeling down and need a good laugh. But don't expect all laughs - there are some serious issues going on that will get your heart all twisted.more
This book is an interesting story with ever changing moods that keep you going. One minute reading this book you'll be laughing at something that's happened, the next you'll be on the verge of tears. It truly is a touching story and I strongly recommend anyone to experience it.more
When I first saw the cover of the book I knew right then and there that I wasn’t going to be very interested in this book. I know that they say never judge a book by its cover, but that saying does not included me in it. Every time that I am handed a book or looking at a book I always judge it; you may say because I had already had a set opinion in mind that I was going to let it affect me through out the book, but I didn’t. To me the setting and mood of the whole novel wasn’t very interesting and there wasn’t a lot of conflict in this story either and I like alot of conflict in my stories to be really interested in it. Yes, their may have been problem within the story, but to me some of those problems could have been solved a long time ago. Overall the novel wasn’t all so bad so don’t let my opinion effect your decision on reading this novel; remember everyone has a different opinion in every type of situation.more
I found that this book left little to be desired. It was well written, and very witty, but little stale if that makes sence. It didn't really go anywhere and was a slow read. The characters were interesting and the idea different but it's plot was for the most part is open. The main character or protagonist would be T.J Jones. He is a senior year and he wants to help out these kids who are constantly being harassed. His teacher wants him to be on the swim team he is coatching so T.J tells him that he wants these cetain people on the team and he will be on it as well. The book goes on about this teams differences and similaritys. overall i thought the book was okay.more
i've read this book twice now and i'm still not bored of it. The book had me going untill the last page. It revolves around the captain of cutter highschool's swim team, T.J jones. At his highschool the letterman jacket is the ultimate symbol for athletics, and anyone who wears it, therefore it's almost unattainable. When mike bourbor, one of the antagonists of the story, sees chris coughlin wearing his dead brothers letter jacket he starts to bully and threaten him. Thats when T.J. jones plots for a way chris, and others like him, can get a letter of their own. Then his journalism teacher, simet, proposes the idea of cutters first swim team. Along the way they make a team, bond with eachother, and battle racism and football players. I'd recommend this to anyone.more
Whale Talk by Chris Crutcher was a good all around book. It deals with many big problems in society that most people dont want to talk about, he directly addresses it. This book might not interest every reader though. I believe this is more of guy's book because it has a lot to do with sports and male testosterone. One of the most appealing parts of this story was the part where the main character stands up and trys to help all those that have been bullied and is trying to help them take revenge on the jocks who have terrorized there lives. It is a strong book in the sence that it deals with so many big problems in just one book such as raceism and abuse and those are only a select few. it was a good book.more
All T.J. Jones wanted was revenge from the jocks who thought they were so superior to everyone else. He wanted to show the jocks, the coach, and the entire school that even an outsider or someone that wasn't in major sports can earn the honor of wearing a letter jacket. However, T.J. could care less about the "pride" a letter jacket gives to a someone in Cutter High. He wants people like Chris Coughlin to have the opportunity to be a part of something. Pretty soon the swim team is born with a bright future and possibilities which include more than just trophies. Friendships are formed that will last longer than the season.more
This a pretty good book. I mean, it’s not my favorite, but I think the different development in the characters and theme of it is extremely interesting. It’s about a multiracial senior in high school, TJ, who is extremely athletically capable, but because he doesn’t like the way his school conducts sports he chooses not to join them. Well, he feels that way until he decides he’s going to stay a swim team for the school to help the outcasts of the school to wear the blue and gold jackets, that are so prestigious at Cutter high school. It deals with problems such as child abuse, spousal abuse, racism, and the effect of bullying. I definitely recommend this book. I even tried to get my mom to read it, but she was too busy at work; oh well, her loss.more
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